Jurassic Park is one of the most iconic and successful Hollywood blockbusters of all time with precisely designed big-budget entertainment delivered by Steven Spielberg, but also one of the groundbreaking performance or intelligent storytelling and developed characters. The screenplay is co-authored by David Koepp and Micheal Crichton who have done their level best to ensure that any plot discrepancy that might crop up is adequately sealed. But the smallest ambiguities in the story have led to fans concocting some elaborate theories. Even though Jurassic Park movies present Hammond to be a highly ambitious man with his charisma and grandfather-like warmth, the theory states that the man hatched a plot conniving a ruse right in front of everybody, without them noticing.

One of the most convincing theories of all suggests that the seemingly lovely industrialist John Hammond and his plan to open a theme park with dinosaur clones might not have been as solemn as portrayed. Let us take a look into how John Hammond is as a person, by focusing on a critical scene. In the third act, John Hammond and Ellie Sattler have a conversation about his first attachment after moving from Scotland to London was with a flea market. Hammond explained that no matter how mechanized it got, people were mostly interested in the fleas performing the tricks.

This is where he wanted Jurassic Park to be different. He nearly tears up when he says that they wanted the world to have something more than just an illusion, something that was real once and something they could touch. What people failed to realize was that Hammond did not intend Jurassic Park to be the world’s largest flea market but instead, he was doing this to lure in the investors more than the audience. His teary-eyed performance lacked any dishonesty, but the same was not true when it came to his plan.

Secondly, the sheer impossibility to clone an entire dinosaur out the DNA procured from a mosquito is a glaring plot hole. Still, fans are willing to accept this as a possibility in the movie’s universe so that the things can get moving. The story is much more logical if we consider the theory that the entire park is nothing more than a stage trick. To clone something that still exists on earth is difficult, let alone an extinct species. Though it is frequently suggested that Hammond engineered plastic dinosaurs in his laboratory and just marketed them as clones, it is still hard to comprehend how he brought in the tremendous flow of investors. The only way to explain it is that he was first and foremost a salesman and he pitched them the idea in words that they wanted to hear.

And pitching the park successfully to the investors was just the first part of his plan because he was marketing his technology which had significant implications. Hammond is directly selling potential for more parks throughout the world. The initial round of funds was ample for him to attain dinosaur DNA and create a defaulted specimen which will die within a concise period. But that can be used as “proof” to spoof progress for the investor and bring in more money from the government and private institutes.

And by the end, even if he makes one robust clone, the revolution would set in, and the investors will be satisfied with the return on investment. They might also want to invest further because they will have a carrot dangling in front of them. The park and the research were both a sham to earn from investors’ need to be part of scientific innovation.

Sadly Hammond was not motivated by research or earth-shattering ideas. He knew his original plan would never materialize, and he decided to bank on the mere illusion of the entire thing. The island itself ensures that they are home to an utterly superficial façade of purpose. Hammond claims that he spared no expense, but there is no proof of his words since it is glaringly apparent that he did not do any justice to the infrastructural requirements.

 Jackson Henry. I’m a writer living in USA. I am a fan of technology, arts, and reading. I’m also interested in writing and education. You can read my blog with a click on the button above.

Source-Crazy Enough to Be True