Title Tag SEO: When Include your brand and / or Boilerplate

If the website you are like most, they include quite a lot of extra "stuff" in the title tag: things like your brand name or repeat the boilerplate text that appears on some pages.

If you include these elements in your  title automatically?

To be fair, most of the sites do.

Or, could it help your digital marketing  to really include the missing information in your title? (Or at least in certain circumstances?)

We know from several studies that certain long titles tend to perform better. A now-famous study of engineers on Etsy shows how short titles performed better than the old one. SEO speculated that this may be due to the shorter title may have relevance more focused (with a focus on core keywords), may get a higher click-through rates or other reasons we can not imagine.

When choosing which part of the title to shorten, brand names, and boilerplate text is the obvious choice. But how do you determine if this is something you should consider for your own SEO?

We've all seen sites like this. Heck, most of us do this on our own site. The question is, whether it has a brand name / our web site at the end of each title actually help, or hurt?

But first, we must also consider other kinds of boilerplate.

What boilerplate? Boilerplate just means a standard, non-text unique pieces that are used repeatedly. This often includes things such as category, product category, tag writers, and slogans.

In the example below, boilerplate text on every title included "Tomatoes - Vegetable Seeds -. Shops"

Sometimes the boilerplate material can be quite long. Major comic book review site Spoilers (! Name awesome) often contain boilerplate same 65-character on many pages:

"Major Spoilers - Comic Book Reviews, News, Previews, and Podcasts"

Of course, this lengthy, it was so long that Google cut each of the titles:

The problems that can cause your digital marketing boilerplate are three:

  1. Relevance: words that do not need to create titles that are less relevant, both search engines and users. For search engines, this could mean a lower rating. For users, this may result in fewer clicks.
  2. Uniqueness: The title that share the same text over and over, and only vary from one another by one or two words, not very unique. While this is not necessarily a problem, contrary to most best digital marketing practices, where uniqueness is key.
  3. Length: Boilerplate means you have less room to display the other words in your title, and Google will often cut off if they exceed a certain length.

Experiment # 1: Remove category of title

Working with the team at SearchPilot, we decided to run some experiments boilerplate here at digital marketing company in Jaipur , to see if we could improve our rankings and traffic by removing some parts repeat our title.

We start with our blog post Whiteboard Friday. Whenever Moz publishes new Whiteboard Friday, we traditionally included the "Whiteboard Friday" in the title.

What would happen if we remove this from the title?

Using A / B split test methodology - where we glide test at 50% of the title and used 50% as a control - we saw an amazing 20% uplift from this experiment.

This graph is the cumulative impact of the tests on organic traffic. The central blue line is the best estimate of how the page variants, the changes are applied, which was compared with what we would have expected without the changes to take effect. Blue shaded area representing a 95% confidence interval of us: there is a 95% probability that the actual outcome is somewhere in the region. If this area is entirely above or below the horizontal axis, which represents a statistically significant test.

Honestly, the results surprised us. Whiteboard Friday is a popular brand (so we thought) but remove it from the title of our boilerplate produced a significant increase in traffic to the page.