India s unmanned shuttle was launched on a HS9 booster rocket from Satish Dhawan Space Centre on Sriharikota, an island off India s Bay of Bengal coast.

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After reaching its peak altitude, RLV-TD began its descent, which was followed by atmospheric re-entry at around Mach 5.

After re-entering Earth s atmosphere with the help of its Thermal Protection System, the spacecraft glided down to land in the Bay of Bengal, about 280 miles from Sriharikota.

The Times of India reports that the final version of the spacecraft is expected in the next 10 to 15 years.

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The successful test earned praise from India s Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Despite the space shuttle s retirement, reusable space planes are set to feature in NASA s future.

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