According to cybersecurity firm Trustware, which has been tracking the exploit's price since it was first listed on sale, this is the second time that the hacker behind the cyber-transaction has been forced to resort to price cuts, in efforts to attract buyers.

When it was first put up for sale, the zero-day vulnerability was attributed with the ability to give cybercriminals administration controls over every Windows device, ranging from Windows 2000 to a fully upgraded version of Windows 10.

However, the recent price cuts may be indicative of some foul play.

Trustware noted that despite "indications that the offer is authentic", there currently seems to be no way to confirm the legitimacy of the zero-day vulnerability "with absolute certainty without taking the risk of purchasing the exploit or waiting for it to appear in the wild".

The zero-day vulnerability was attributed with the ability to give cybercriminals administration controls over every Windows device

Commeting on the price of the exploit, Trustware said: "Even though the price of the zero day was lowered 12 days after the initial post, it was only lowered a mere 5.3% from 95K to 90K.

Exploit vendor Zerodium disclosed a list of zero-day prices in November 2015, which shows that Windows zero-day LPEs are generally valued at $30,000.

The text above is a summary, you can read full article here.