For the first time, researchers have shown how even ordinary classical computer users could remotely access quantum computing resources online while keeping their quantum computations securely hidden from the quantum computer itself.

Tech giants such as Google and IBM are racing to build universal quantum computers that could someday analyze millions of possible solutions much faster than today’s most powerful classical supercomputers.

That assumption is now being challenged by researchers in Singapore and Australia through a new paper published in the 11 July issue of the journal Physical Review X.

“Frankly, I think we are all quite surprised that this is possible,” says Joseph Fitzsimons, a theoretical physicist for the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore and principal investigator on the study.

“There had been a number of results showing that it was unlikely for a classical user to be able to hide [delegated quantum computations] perfectly, and I think many of us in the field had interpreted this as evidence that nothing useful could be hidden.”

The technique for helping classical computer users hide their quantum computations relies upon a particular approach known as measurement-based quantum computing.

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