In a sense, we have already become cyborgs, tethered to our external electronic devices, outsourcing to them our memories, our sense of direction, our socialising, our lives.Machines are as limited as humans when it comes to the kinds of sensations they can detect.This month, the collective released North Sense, a small electronic device implanted into the skin to give the wearer a sense of direction.The implant connects the user to Earth s magnetic field, vibrating whenever facing north.This was not another step towards us becoming machines, but towards us becoming more human, co-founder Liviu Babitz told the Creator s Project.This fall, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first ever artificial pancreas, a wireless, out of body device designed to free diabetics from having to constantly adjust insulin levels to keep their blood sugar stable.
In a sense, we have already become cyborgs, tethered to our external electronic devices, outsourcing to them our memories, our sense of direction, our socialising, our lives.Machines are as limited as humans when it comes to the kinds of sensations they can detect.This month, the collective released North Sense, a small electronic device implanted into the skin to give the wearer a sense of direction.The implant connects the user to Earth s magnetic field, vibrating whenever facing north.This was not another step towards us becoming machines, but towards us becoming more human, co-founder Liviu Babitz told the Creator s Project.This fall, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first ever artificial pancreas, a wireless, out of body device designed to free diabetics from having to constantly adjust insulin levels to keep their blood sugar stable.
By the end of the 90-minute special, it s really not clear what Geraldo believes is going on within the Satanic underground, or if he even believes it exists at all.Set in Charleston, South Carolina, Exorcism introduces Abby, a working-class loner who s befriended maybe even rescued by Gretchen, a too-sheltered rich kid who bonds with Abby during a disastrous early- 80s birthday party.A few years later, the now-teenaged chums find their long-time bond challenged after a one-off acid trip, during which Gretchen disappears into darkened woods.The corpse in question is that of a largely average high-school jock whose suicide upends a rural Pennsylvania town—but whose death also brings together the unadventurous Hannah with Lacey, a class-cutting, chain-smoking, Kurt Cobain-obsessed alternakid who draws Hannah out of her happily PG existence and into a dizzying spree-turned-spiral of drugs, parties and, eventually, some blood-drenched, semi-Satanic antics.It s a decision that leads to Lacey being accused of Satanic tendencies, and that finally brings all three girls, guided by sinister motivations, to the same woods where their former classmate turned up dead.Like Exorcism s Abby and Gretchen, Fire s Lacey and Hannah are outsiders whose relationship flourishes in an environment of latchkey laissez faire-ness and shenanigans-inspiring boredom.
Take the case of software engineer Jason Calabrese, who has developed a smart insulin applicator for his nine-year-old son.The system he used was based on plans he found online, for OpenAPS.Pioneered by 27-year-old Dana Lewis, the system works by using a small, sub-cutaneous sensor to track blood sugar levels, attached to a radio-controlled insulin pump.The battery to power it all varies in size and shape depending on the individual hacker, but in the case of Mr Calabrese, it s about the size of a headphone case as per WSJ that resides inside the base of his son s backpack.Government agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration FDA have refused to comment on the story, presumably since it does not want to recommend or condone the development of these devices — in case something goes wrong.Most involved in developing these devices recommend them only to those with some experience, though there are many who have taken up programming as a hobby in an effort to aid their children or other loved ones.
To be more specific, he needs to convince several thousand of them, aged around 24, to be weighed, prodded and quizzed, donate blood and urine as well as undergo scans of their livers, hearts, necks and entire bodies.Their data has been used in more than 1,200 academic papers worldwide, including ones showing the benefits of eating fish during pregnancy, that peanut oil in baby lotions is linked to later peanut allergy, and that 15 minutes of exercise a day halves the risk of childhood obesity.This may sound a lot, but the Bristol study is part of a bigger and more unusual enterprise, a remarkable series of birth cohort studies that have tracked successive generations born in Britain.Researchers around the world are keen to use the data: "We have a clutch of proposals every week," says Nicholas Timpson, a genetic epidemiologist who leads many of the omic studies for ALSPAC.Around 1,000 cohort members have already attended the latest clinic, Focus @ 24 , which will collect measurements when these young adults are at their physical prime.Another project will also start this year involving wiring up the bodies and homes of 30 study members with sensors to measure how active they are, and in-house sensors and cameras to monitor eating, sleeping and TV watching.
Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes speaking in San Francisco last year.The Edison machines were touted as revolutionary and were the main basis for the $9 billion valuation attained by the Palo Alto, Calif., company in a funding round in 2014.The company has told the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that it has issued tens of thousands of corrected blood-test reports to doctors and patients, voiding some results and revising others, according to the person familiar with the matter.In response to questions from The Wall Street Journal about the blood-test corrections, Theranos spokeswoman Brooke Buchanan said: Excellence in quality and patient safety is our top priority and we ve taken comprehensive corrective measures to address the issues CMS raised in their observations.As these matters are currently under review, we have no further comment at this time.CMS also has threatened to revoke the California lab s federal license and impose fines against Theranos.
But, as the fantasy series' creator George R. R. Martin explains in a Galaxy s Edge Magazine interview, it's never gratuitous, however bloody the demise may be.Particularly if you re writing about war, which is certainly a central subject in Game of Thrones.You don t get to live forever just because you are a cute kid or the hero s best friend or the hero.And certainly, the blood continues to be spilt in the latest season of Game of Thrones, with season six seeing a significant character being 'offed in pretty much every episode so far.Interestingly, the show hasn't lost its bloodlust despite now outpacing the source material – the next entry in the book series that covers the contents of season six was due for release back in January, but as of May 2016 Martin admitted The Winds of Winter still wasn't ready.Galaxy s Edge Magazine via Independent
It's rare, but it's responsible for the death of Steve Jobs, Patrick Swayze, among others.The pancreas, where the cancer starts, sits behind the stomach near a bunch of other important organs.That's also a tricky approach, she said, because when you inject the chemotherapy into the bloodstream it's still difficult to reach the pancreatic tumor with very few blood cells.Her solution?With the help of MIT and the Massachusetts General Hospital, she came up with a new way to deliver the chemotherapy drugs so they go directly to the pancreas."The device is still in pre-clinical trials, which means it hasn't made its way into humans yet.But because it will be using a drug that's already used to treat pancreatic cancer called paclitaxel , Indolfi told Fast Company in March that she hopes the clinical trial process will only take a few years, making it available to patients in about five years.Watch the full video: NOW WATCH: How to freeze water instantlyLoading video...
Troubled startup Theranos has voided two years' worth of blood-test results from its flagship Edison machines, reports The Wall Street Journal.Those machines are Theranos' main claim to fame.CEO Elizabeth Holmes rose to prominence on the huge promise that, with Edison, Theranos can test for blood-borne diseases with only a pinprick of blood from a fingertip.But amid larger concerns over the accuracy and viability of the Edison technology, Theranos has told federal regulators that it's thrown out all results from 2014 and 2015.That includes tests that Theranos did with Edison, as well as the ones it performed with traditional lab equipment, according to The Journal's report.That means that anybody who got a Theranos blood test during that period may have gotten wrong results.The Journal report indicates that physicians in Phoenix have gotten corrected results from Theranos in recent weeks.In fact, one patient went to the emergency room in 2014 based on a Theranos blood-test result, says the report — a result that's now been amended.The move to throw the test results out is a sign that Theranos is trying to show government agencies that it can regulate its own shortcomings."We've taken comprehensive corrective measures to address the issues CMS raised in their observations.As these matters are currently under review, we have no further comment at this time," the company said, referring to the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.NOW WATCH: How NASA s groundbreaking work on human blood can predict your reaction to certain drugsLoading video...
The blood-testing startup Theranos has announced to health regulators that it has voided and revised results from its tests.In turn, that means health decisions could have been made using incorrect evidence.Things have gone from bad to worse for Theranos in recent months.It came under intense media scrutiny back in October 2015 over the accuracy of its results, which spurred US health regulators to investigate complaints about the company s lab and research practices late last year.In a statement issued to the Journal, Theranos explained that: Excellence in quality and patient safety is our top priority and we ve taken comprehensive corrective measures to address the issues Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services raised in their observations.As these matters are currently under review, we have no further comment at this time.
Troubled bio-tech startup Theranos has told the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services CMS that it voided two years of results from the blood tests that it once staked its future on, reports the Wall Street Journal.According to the WSJ, Theranos also told the CMS—which is currently investigating the startup for compliance issues—that it has issued tens of thousands of corrected blood test reports to doctors and patients, with some results voided and others revised.TechCrunch has contacted Theranos and the CMS for comment.The WSJ spoke to several doctors near Phoenix, Arizona who said they had received corrected reports, including one physician who sent a patient to the emergency room based on erroneous results from Theranos.The CMS is just one of several federal agencies currently investigating Theranos for issues connected to its diagnostic tests and business operations.The CMS investigation revolves around compliance issues at Theranos main lab in Newark, California and may result in a two-year suspension from owning or running a lab for Elizabeth Holmes, the company s founder, and Sunny Balwani, its former president.
It's going to work on the London Underground.6.The company voided two years' worth of blood tests.7.The NHS Royal Free Trust is still using Streams.9.Apple sent engineers to a customer's house after iTunes deleted a load of his music.Customers keep complaining that signing up to Apple Music causes music to be deleted.10.Rocket Internet's billionaire founder is backing a 'proptech' startup that wants to simplify renting.
In a blog post today, Uber showed off the self-driving car that s been stealthily cruising around Pittsburgh.This heavy hiring out of Carnegie Mellon could give Uber a big boost.The Pittsburgh-based university considers itself the birthplace of self-driving cars, and it probably is.In March, Uber also joined a coalition, this time in partnership with Google, to advocate for self-driving adoption.For now, Uber s ambitious autonomous efforts remain contained on Pittsburgh streets with a flesh-and-blood human behind the wheel.But with Google expanding its own efforts to Arizona for temperature testing, it looks like the race toward hands-free transportation is well underway.
Here s what s on the Thursday menu.Theranos voids two years of blood-test results, issues thousands of corrected reports.WSJ Google appeals French right to be forgotten order — which calls for Google to apply removals of links to all its domains, not just ones in Europe — to France s highest court.The students who are suing Google over email scanning have asked magistrate judge Paul Grewal, who is overseeing procedural matters related to the case, to recuse himself because he has accepted a job with Facebook.He starts next month.In meeting with Apple CEO Tim Cook, China regulator stressed Chinese users security.LinkedIn said Wednesday it s working to invalidate 100 million potentially compromised passwords that were taken during a 2012 breach, after reports that a hacker is selling them.Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos responded Wednesday to recent accusations by Donald Trump that he and the company have tax and antitrust issues, saying it s not an appropriate way for a presidential candidate to behave.Washington Post Taxi prices around the world have declined because of what Deutsche is calling the Uber effect.Photo: Judge Paul Grewal poses in his office in the federal courthouse in downtown San Jose, Calif., Friday, Jan. 23, 2015.Grewal, a magistrate judge, is set to start working at Facebook next month as deputy general counsel in charge of litigation.
You have to wonder what other errors Theranos has that it s going to need to correct.The latest issue surrounding the troubled lab-technology company: It has voided the results of two years worth of blood tests that were done with Theranos Edison blood-testing devices.The Wall Street Journal reported that Theranos has re-issued thousands of test results that it has corrected.The company processed approximately 890,000 tests a year in its labs.You read that right: Two years of blood tests were basically stricken from the record.The company s valuation ended up being based on a technology that Theranos itself had given up on.All of that can t help Theranos case that the doors of its Palo Alto headquarters, and its testing labs, should be kept open.The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services are still considering pulling Theranos license to operate labs in California, and have proposed kicking Theranos Chief Executive and founder Elizabeth Holmes out of the blood-testing industry for two years and fining the company, to boot, according to the Journal.Last week, Sunny Balwani stepped down from his president and chief operating officer posts at Theranos rather than face the possibility of a two-year ban from the blood-testing industry himself.Photo: Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes in 2014.
Theranos CEO and founder, Elizabeth HolmesAfter federal regulators threatened to revoke Theranos license to perform blood tests and ban its CEO and COO from the industry altogether, the company reportedly issued tens of thousands of corrections to blood tests it performed.Theranos has also voided all of the 2014 and 2015 results reported from its once-famed Edison blood testing machines, according to the Wall Street Journal.The Edison machines, which were said to be able to perform more than 200 medical tests with just a few drops of blood, were key to the young biotech company earning a whopping $9 billion valuation in 2014.Yet, in the wake of reports that the machines were inaccurate and unreliable and that employees were unqualified and failing to follow proper protocols and fix problems, the company acknowledged that it had completely stopped using the devices in June 2015.The unprecedented number of corrected lab results are just one of the steps Theranos is taking to try to appease the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which in March threatened to revoke the company s license and ban CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes, and its president and COO, Sunny Balwani, from blood testing.Theranos has since hired new clinical laboratory advisors and it was announced last week that Balwani is leaving the company.
In a blog post today, Uber officially showed off the self-driving car that s been stealthily cruising around Pittsburgh city streets.This particular Uber test vehicle was first spotted almost a year ago by local Pittsburgh media, but this is Uber s first acknowledgement of such tests.This heavy hiring out of Carnegie Mellon could give Uber a boost seeing as the Pittsburgh-based university considers itself the birthplace of self-driving cars — it makes sense since CMU researchers were driving autonomous vehicles across the country before Google even existed.Uber recently joined a coalition, along with Google and Ford, to advocate for self-driving adoption.For now, Uber s ambitious autonomous efforts remain contained on Pittsburgh city streets with a flesh-and-blood human behind the wheel.But with Google expanding its own efforts to Arizona for temperature testing, it looks like the race toward hands-free transportation is well underway.
In the aftermath of the 2015 Paris attacks, millions across the globe shared comforting words and waved virtual French flags solidarity.News coverage at any level is often fleeting, and our global attention span shifts to the next tragedy before anything is accomplished.Sometimes it feels like humanity is more concerned with looking good than doing good.Kenneth Cole made this controversial mistake twice when their official Twitter misappropriated hashtags to boost their sales.Not everyone is capable of contributing to solving crises in the same way.Others cared for children, prepared food, and led religious services.
Theranos' business model is built on the idea that it can offer more than 100 simple blood tests directly to patients at a much lower cost than traditional blood labs, ideally using its own technology to test that blood with only a finger-prick.But it has faced accusations about the validity of its technology since last year, and in January the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services found problems with its Northern California lab in January, saying some of its practices "pose immediate jeopardy to patient health and safety.Its founder Elizabeth Holmes said in a TV interview recently that, "we stopped testing and have taken the approach of saying, 'Let s rebuild this entire lab from scratch so that we can ensure it never happens again.Take a consumer genetics test, for example: Rather than making an appointment at the doctor, sitting for an array of expensive genetic tests, waiting days for the results and then having to trek back to the office to discuss them at your physician's convenience, the company offered a simple, straightforward alternative: Spit in a tube, mail it in, and get results online in a visual, simple-to-understand format.Theranos has been doing something similar, but with blood instead of spit."We've taken comprehensive corrective measures to address the issues CMS raised in their observations.Many "disruptive" Silicon Valley health companies have run into this regulatory problem as well.But because Theranos focuses on blood tests, which provide information that the average person could act on, like diagnosing a sexually transmitted disease or monitoring an existing diagnosis, Theranos faces an additional scrutiny.For example, a patient who had gotten a blood test through Theranos went to the emergency room in 2014 after a blood-test result that showed abnormally high results, The Journal reported."Holmes then went on to explain, in veiled terms, a bit about how the company runs its tests in an attempt to dispel some claims about dilution methods.
In a blog post today, Uber officially showed off the self-driving car that s been stealthily cruising around Pittsburgh city streets.This particular Uber test vehicle was first spotted almost a year ago by local Pittsburgh media, but this is Uber s first acknowledgement of such tests.This heavy hiring out of Carnegie Mellon could give Uber a boost seeing as the Pittsburgh-based university considers itself the birthplace of self-driving cars — it makes sense since CMU researchers were driving autonomous vehicles across the country before Google even existed.Uber recently joined a coalition, along with Google and Ford, to advocate for self-driving adoption.For now, Uber s ambitious autonomous efforts remain contained on Pittsburgh city streets with a flesh-and-blood human behind the wheel.But with Google expanding its own efforts to Arizona for temperature testing, it looks like the race toward hands-free transportation is well underway.
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