Miners dug hundreds, even thousands, of feet into the ground here, extracting one of humanity's most treasured minerals: salt.They've since left the mine, having extracted its treasures, but they left behind an incredible patchwork of passages as tall as cathedrals.Proponents claim the salt keeps the air inside the mines free of allergens, and low in bacteria.Nearly 1,400 feet underground, the potassium and stone salt mine near the town of Soligorsk, south of Minsk, in Belarus is a popular destination for medical treatments.The Republican Clinic of Speleotherapy says more than 7,000 children and adults go to the mine each year to relieve their respiratory illnesses.The US Food and Drug Administration has approved medications called mucolytics that can thin the mucus in the lungs in a similar way.
In a sense, we have already become cyborgs, tethered to our external electronic devices, outsourcing to them our memories, our sense of direction, our socialising, our lives.Machines are as limited as humans when it comes to the kinds of sensations they can detect.This month, the collective released North Sense, a small electronic device implanted into the skin to give the wearer a sense of direction.The implant connects the user to Earth s magnetic field, vibrating whenever facing north.This was not another step towards us becoming machines, but towards us becoming more human, co-founder Liviu Babitz told the Creator s Project.This fall, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first ever artificial pancreas, a wireless, out of body device designed to free diabetics from having to constantly adjust insulin levels to keep their blood sugar stable.
In a sense, we have already become cyborgs, tethered to our external electronic devices, outsourcing to them our memories, our sense of direction, our socialising, our lives.Machines are as limited as humans when it comes to the kinds of sensations they can detect.This month, the collective released North Sense, a small electronic device implanted into the skin to give the wearer a sense of direction.The implant connects the user to Earth s magnetic field, vibrating whenever facing north.This was not another step towards us becoming machines, but towards us becoming more human, co-founder Liviu Babitz told the Creator s Project.This fall, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first ever artificial pancreas, a wireless, out of body device designed to free diabetics from having to constantly adjust insulin levels to keep their blood sugar stable.
listed companies Kesko and Oriola-KD are based on the new moisturizers and vitamins to sell the chain.listed companies rely on the fact that the familiar name you appeal to politicians across the parties.the board of directors of Oriola-KD and Kesko's own chain exactly in half.This year opened 15 stores and a total of them comes up to a hundred.common sense tells you to evaluate this: without the drugs it's in the tens of millions of euros of turnover, but the prescription drug with hundreds of millions.the board of directors of Oriola-KD runs in Sweden Kronans Apotek -chain.
Russian athletes are currently banned from international competition until they can satisfy "strict criteria" to prove to officials they are clean and more than 100 Olympic athletes who competed at the 2008 and 2012 events have been sanctioned.These bans relate to drug doping, but there are other forms of "doping".Femke Van den Driessche was said to have a concealed an electric motor in her bike during the Cyclocross World Championships and was fined £14,000 alongside her ban.Riders can activate the motors via Bluetooth by flipping tiny hidden switches in the handlebars.The system works by using tiny electromagnetic coils inside the structure of the wheel to propel the bike.Electromagnetic wheels can add up to 60 watts to pedalling power, and motors hidden inside water bottles or underneath seats can boost speed by up to 5kph.
Alan RockefellerPsilocybin, the psychedelic compound in magic mushrooms, may be an effective way to treat depression in patients that have seen no benefit from other, standard forms of treatment, early results suggest.In a pilot study involving just 12 people with treatment-resistant depression, two doses of the mushroom compound cleared symptoms in eight participants—67 percent—after one week.We are simply saying that this is doable, Robin Carhart-Harris, a neuropsychopharmacologist at Imperial College London and first author of the study, told Nature.Carhart-Harris and colleagues got the idea to try psilocybin after earlier brain imaging studies found that the compound activated brain regions associated with antidepressant effects.Plus, large population studies have found that people who used psychedelics in their lifetime have lower rates of psychological distress and suicidal episodes compared to those that didn t.Moreover, psilocybin is readily converted to psilocin in the body, which can activates serotonin receptors.While the efficacy was pretty remarkable, according to Carhart-Harris, far more work will need to be done to prove that psilocybin can treat depression reliably.
Stop using switches, we are well no animals either? With a Knocki on any surface in your home, you can tap on the wall to turn the lights on, change the channel or snooze a little longer. Shut up and take my money, seems to be the instinctive reaction on Kickstarter. In one hour drug Knocki their demanded 35 000 dollars, and less than a day later, the figure has multiplied. Knocki is a small box that can be attached to any surface and can be programmed to recognize up to ten different tapping patterns. Play Replay with sound Play with Sound 00:00 00:00 Kickstarter Alert icon arrow down icon arrow-left icon arrow-right icon arrow-thin-left icon arrow-thin-right icon arrow-up icon backer badge icon bar-chart icon bell icon bookmark icon fire-assets icon calendar icon cart icon chat icon check icon clipboard icon clock icon close icon closed-caption icon Compose icon conversion icon Direct-left icon direct-right icon Direct-up icon download icon drop-down icon embed icon expand icon facebook-box icon facebook icon flag icon globe icon grid icon heart icon help icon image icon info icon instagram icon kickstarter circle icon kickstarter icon leaf icon link icon location pin icon lock icon mail icon menu icon Move icon music icon Pause icon pin icon pinterest icon play icon plus-circle icon plus icon report icon ribbon icon Search icon share icon star icon stop icon while icon thumbs-up icon tools icon trash icon tumblr icon twitter icon unlink icon user icon video icon view-all icon vine icon volume-up icon volume icon write icon youtube icon
In 1982, a tainted drug caused a handful of young Californians to become mysteriously frozen, unable to move.There was this big argument that broke out on the ward, remembers William Langston, chief scientific officer and founder of the Parkinson s Institute, a clinic and research center in Sunnyvale, California.In time, two more frozen patients, Connie and Toby, found their way into Langston s clinic.A mass spectrometer adds charges to molecules and then separates them according to their mass using a magnetic field, creating a spectrum from a complicated chemical mixture.He managed to do this successfully for a while, but he got sloppy with one batch.Connie s response to levodopa was limited, suggesting that her illness may have been too advanced to benefit from the procedure.
Nokia's back, baby!On Wednesday, Microsoft announced plans to sell the Nokia brand for old-fashioned featurephones for a cool $350 million to the Taiwanese smartphone manufacturer Foxconn, best known as the manufacturer of the iPhone.Back in 2014, Microsoft officially ditched the Nokia brand for its smartphones, focusing on its Lumia and Windows Phone products.As a result, the once independent Finnish company's name is now most commonly associated with Snake II, teenagers' first phones circa 2002, and drug dealers.But while Nokia and featurephones have faded from view in the West, they remain a huge market globally.And at the iPod's all-time high, in 2008, 58.3 million units were sold — one-tenth the size of the dumbphone industry in 2015.The featurephone market is even an order of magnitude larger than the global auto market, which shipped 72.4 million vehicles in 2015, according to data compiled by Statista.Amid Apple CEO Tim Cook's visit to India this week, people are raving about the potential the region holds for the smartphone industry's growth.There are a "billion phone sales at stake," Bloomberg wrote.And while there is certainly potential there, the established featurephone market isn't going anywhere anytime soon.Cook acknowledged as much on the California-based company's quarterly earnings call last month, telling analysts: "The smartphones that are working there are low end, primarily because of the network and the economics, so the market potential has not been as great there."So while you might not use a Nokia dumbphone anymore, a hell of a lot of people still do.SEE ALSO: Apple is on a charm offensive in ChinaNOW WATCH: Your smartphone could be causing your face to break outLoading video...
Foundation Medicine, a company that got its start with backing from Google Ventures, Bill Gates, and other major tech investors, received a patent this morning that protects its cancer genomic sequencing process.Now, it's using that patent to sue a competitor, Guardant Health."We certainly intend to pursue the value of this patent, we also have always been focused on and remain focused on a very patient-centric mission," Foundation President Steve Kafka told Business Insider on Tuesday."So our intent here is not to block other laboratories from their testing ... but really to develop strategies to recognize the value that we've captured or we've created, rather.Guardant declined to comment on the patent.Cancer genome sequencingWhen people are diagnosed with cancer, there's a pretty standard course of treatment to fight off the disease: the doctor may start with surgery or a regimen of drugs that are known to work on a particular type of cancer.But after a while, if that first round doesn't knock out all the cancer cells, the cancer can come back and be even trickier to treat.Those harder to treat and rare cancers is where cancer genomics companies, including Foundation Medicine, are trying to help.And earlier this month, the company launched its liquid biopsy test, which looks for circulating tumor DNA in the blood.That data also goes into a Foundation Medicine database, where people ranging from doctors looking for methods to treat a certain rare cancer to pharmaceutical companies interested in finding the patients who will respond the best to a drug that's in development could look at it.NOW WATCH: Only in San Francisco — inside the 232-square-foot micro apartment that sold for nearly $425,000Loading video...
The NHS Royal Free Trust said it plans to continue testing a kidney monitoring app developed by Google DeepMind, despite regulators moving in.The app, known as Streams, aims to help clinicians detect acute kidney injury AKI — a condition that kills more than 1,000 people a month.A Royal Free spokesman denied that trials with DeepMind had been suspended after TechCrunch reported the app was not currently being used."The UK s medicines and healthcare devices regulator, the MHRA, is in talks with Google DeepMind and the Royal Free about the app, according to TechCrunch."We have been in contact with Google since May 4 and are currently in discussions with them about whether or not their app needs to be registered as a device," a spokesman for the MHRA told TechCrunch.The Information Commissioners Office ICO is also investigating the partnership between the two organisations after receiving a small number of complaints from individuals.So far, the Royal Free has carried out three small "user tests" for the Streams app involving an unspecified number of patients.Each trial lasted between two and six days and involved up to six clinicians.DeepMind came under scrutiny after New Scientist revealed it had signed an extensive data-sharing agreement with the NHS Royal Free Trust to develop the Streams app.The agreement gives DeepMind access to 1.6 million medical records for patients across three London hospitals: Barnet, Chase Farm, and the Royal Free.Through the data-sharing agreement with the NHS, DeepMind will be able to see data that is unrelated to kidney function, including whether people are HIV-positive as well as details of drug overdoses and abortions.Privacy campaigners and healthcare professionals have questioned why DeepMind needs access to so much data to develop a relatively niche app.A board of healthcare experts and government tech leaders are due to scrutinise DeepMind's work with the NHS.
Take the case of software engineer Jason Calabrese, who has developed a smart insulin applicator for his nine-year-old son.The system he used was based on plans he found online, for OpenAPS.Pioneered by 27-year-old Dana Lewis, the system works by using a small, sub-cutaneous sensor to track blood sugar levels, attached to a radio-controlled insulin pump.The battery to power it all varies in size and shape depending on the individual hacker, but in the case of Mr Calabrese, it s about the size of a headphone case as per WSJ that resides inside the base of his son s backpack.Government agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration FDA have refused to comment on the story, presumably since it does not want to recommend or condone the development of these devices — in case something goes wrong.Most involved in developing these devices recommend them only to those with some experience, though there are many who have taken up programming as a hobby in an effort to aid their children or other loved ones.
Colourbox Professor of Traffic Medicine Timo Tervo evaluated in Helsingin Sanomat that the doctors do not necessarily have to comply with the instructions given in the assessment of driving ability. I have known quite certain cases. Sometimes it was even suggested that the patient has been threatening, and not because the doctor did not dare to deny this authority for the movement. Tervo says that doctors do not always want to follow the instructions, and this allows for the fact that the Directive has been the possibility of an exemption. Tervo, this is a mistake. Basically, the situation may be, we have a drug addict, who is in substitution treatment but disappears after Subutex car from the parking lot because the doctor considers him in running order, Tervo says.
It's rare, but it's responsible for the death of Steve Jobs, Patrick Swayze, among others.The pancreas, where the cancer starts, sits behind the stomach near a bunch of other important organs.That's also a tricky approach, she said, because when you inject the chemotherapy into the bloodstream it's still difficult to reach the pancreatic tumor with very few blood cells.Her solution?With the help of MIT and the Massachusetts General Hospital, she came up with a new way to deliver the chemotherapy drugs so they go directly to the pancreas."The device is still in pre-clinical trials, which means it hasn't made its way into humans yet.But because it will be using a drug that's already used to treat pancreatic cancer called paclitaxel , Indolfi told Fast Company in March that she hopes the clinical trial process will only take a few years, making it available to patients in about five years.Watch the full video: NOW WATCH: How to freeze water instantlyLoading video...
The company cleverly managed to snag the most appropriate domain out there: Fast.com.Of course, some more experienced Internet users might wonder why the site is so simple in its approach.The site uses Netflix servers to test your download speed and can give you results no matter where you are internationally and no matter which device desktop or mobile you use."Like the cellular data controls we recently introduced, fast.com is another tool consumers can use for greater insight and control of their Internet service."However, the obscure URL and advertisement-cluttered interface may turn off less techie users.With a clean look and simple URL like Fast.com, this could quickly become both a widely used speed tester for a mainstream audience, as well as a Netflix gateway drug of sorts once you see the subtle "powered by Netflix" logo at the bottom of the page.
A Hong Kong regulator has pointed the finger at Alibaba for breaching acquisition rules when it purchased a healthcare company two years ago, saying the Chinese e-commerce company bought the firm on favorable terms due to a connection with the company s executives.Alibaba purchased CITIC 21 CN in 2014 for $170 million USD, which has since been restructured under Alibaba Health Information Technology Ltd.According to a ruling from the the Takeovers and Mergers Panel of the Hong Kong Securities And Futures Commission posted on Wednesday, Alibaba also purchased another medical technology firm at the time, Hebei Huiyan Medical Technology Co., which was owned by the brother of CITIC 21 CN s vice chairman.The regulator has accused Alibaba of purchasing the second company under favorable conditions, meaning the same deal was not made available to other shareholders.The deal constituted a special deal with favourable conditions which were not extended to all shareholders and was a clear breach of the Takeovers Code, said the result published by the Takeovers and Mergers Panel of the Hong Kong Securities And Futures Commission.The acquisition of CITIC 21 CN left many onlookers scratching their heads back in 2014, when the company was operating at a significant loss.One of the primary benefits of the deal for Alibaba was CITIC 21 CN s large pharmaceutical data base.In July 2014 Alibaba announced they had integrated the company s data to their own e-commerce platform, forming the backbone of their Drug Safety Program , which was launched to clean their e-commerce platforms of fake drugs.Last month when the initial ruling was announced Alibaba said that they would contest the outcome.Alibaba transferred their pharmacy business into Alibaba Health in April last year, consolidating their two biggest health investments.The health arm now oversees the sale of pharmacy products as well as other data-driven healthcare projects.
The "superbug" now kills 20,000 people each year.Photo: DTKUTOO/iStock/360/Getty ImagesDrug-resistant infections - or "superbugs" – could claim 10 million lives a year and could cost a cumulative US$100 trillion of economic output by 2050 if the world does not act to slow down the rise of drug resistance, a new report warned.O'Neill said that it was fair to assume, at current rates, that over one million people had died since his review had started in 2014.O'Neill is renowned as the economist who coined the term "BRIC" in 2001 to refer to the then- emerging economic powerhouses Brazil, Russia, India and China.O'Neill noted that many of the urgent problems posed by AMR are economic, "so we need an economist, especially one versed in macro-economic issues and the world economy, to create the solutions."O'Neill noted that the U.K. and China had already agreed to contribute US$72 million each into a new "Global Innovation Fund" to research AMR and called for other governments to contribute.
A drug which boosts the body s immune system has been found as an exciting step forward in the battle against skin cancer.Four-in-10 patients who had a deadly skin cancer were still alive after three years after being given the drug.What s even more promising is that 15 per cent of those that were given the drug showed no signs of cancer at all.While the human body is incredibly capable of fighting infections, it has a lot of safeguards built in to stop it attacking human tissues.President-elect of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Dr Daniel Hayes explained the importance of this drug: This has been a bad disease, it s hard to treat, it s a sneaky disease and the mortality rates have been enormous so to see 40% of patients alive at three years is really a step forward.Thanks to some very early and clear successes with the drug the findings are already being put into action with the NHS approving pembrolizumab for patients with melanoma.
A global report says that superbugs will kill people every three seconds by 2050, unless medics change their approach to antibiotics and public awareness about resistance improves.The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance paints an extremely grim picture of the future, in which superbugs could prove a bigger threat to humans than cancer and basic medical procedures and minor injuries could become deadly.Doctors have been accused of handing out antibiotics like sweets , with over-prescription leading to increased resistance.Lord Jim O'Neill led the review, which was commissioned in 2014, and has published a global action plan to help us tackle the threat.It goes a little something like this:Reduce the unnecessary use of antimicrobial drugs in healthcareImprove global awareness of resistancePay companies $1 billion £0.7 billion for each new antibiotic discoveredSet up a $2 billion £1.4 billion Global Innovation Fund for researchReduce the unnecessarily heavy use of antibiotics in farmingImprove surveillance of the spread of drug resistancePromote the use of vaccines and alternatives to drugs My review not only makes it clear how big a threat AMR is to the world, with a potential 10 million people dying each year by 2050, but also now sets out a workable blueprint for bold, global action to tackle this challenge, said Lord O Neill, adding, If we don't solve the problem we are heading to the dark ages, we will have a lot of people dying.Screw it, burger and chips and a side of germs for lunch.
A global report says that superbugs will kill people every three seconds by 2050, unless medics change their approach to antibiotics and public awareness about resistance improves.The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance paints an extremely grim picture of the future, in which superbugs could prove a bigger threat to humans than cancer and basic medical procedures and minor injuries could become deadly.Doctors have been accused of handing out antibiotics like sweets , with over-prescription leading to increased resistance.Lord Jim O'Neill led the review, which was commissioned in 2014, and has published a global action plan to help us tackle the threat.It goes a little something like this:Reduce the unnecessary use of antimicrobial drugs in healthcareImprove global awareness of resistancePay companies $1 billion £0.7 billion for each new antibiotic discoveredSet up a $2 billion £1.4 billion Global Innovation Fund for researchReduce the unnecessarily heavy use of antibiotics in farmingImprove surveillance of the spread of drug resistancePromote the use of vaccines and alternatives to drugs My review not only makes it clear how big a threat AMR is to the world, with a potential 10 million people dying each year by 2050, but also now sets out a workable blueprint for bold, global action to tackle this challenge, said Lord O Neill, adding, If we don't solve the problem we are heading to the dark ages, we will have a lot of people dying.Screw it, burger and chips and a side of germs for lunch.
More

Top