Also: Cygnus named for Columbia 'naut, and Space Shuttle Endeavour dressed up for launch In brief  "As we've always said, we expect it to take three flights to make it to orbit," upstart launch vehicle outfit Astra bravely said as its imaginatively named Rocket 3.1 went *phut* shortly after lift-off last week.…
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Global IOT (internet of things) for public safety market is projected to register a CAGR of 15.8% in the forecast period of 2020 to 2026.IoT (Internet of Things) for public safety market assists in predicting the cyberattacks, natural calamities and other dangerous attacks that can negatively impact the economy as a whole and also it helps in mitigating the risks for the governments, and people.There are various reasons due to which IoT are considered for public safety such as developing smart cities, smart parking, and other smart solutions for the benefit and safety of public.Download PDF Sample report @ https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/request-a-sample/?dbmr=global-iot-internet-of-things-for-public-safety-market Competitive Analysis: Global IoT (Internet of Things) for Public Safety Market Some of the major players operating in this market are Hitachi Vantara Corporation, Microsoft, IBM, NEC Corporation, ThroughTek Co., Ltd, Iskratel, Securens, SmartCone Technologies Inc., KOVA Corporation, ESRI, Cradlepoint, Inc., ENDEAVOUR TECHNOLOGY, X-Systems, West Corporation, Carbyne, Star Controls, Inc., Cisco Systems, Inc. , Sierra Wireless , Telit, Nokia and others.Segmentation: Global IoT (Internet of Things) for Public Safety Market The IOT (Internet of Things) for public safety market is segmented into four notable segments which are component, end user, application and geography.On the basis of component, the market is segmented into solutions, platform and service.The Solutions is sub-segmented into crime prediction and prevention, emergency management, law enforcement and others.On the basis of end user, the market is segmented into industrial IoT, connected healthcare, smart transportation, smart utilities, smart building and home automation, homeland security and others.On the basis of application, the market is segmented into surveillance and security, disaster management and critical infrastructure security.Focus of the reportCAGR values in the market for the forecast periodKey trends in the market placeMajor players and brandsHistorical and current market size and projection up to 2026.Detailed overview of parent marketChanging market dynamics of the industryReasons to Purchase this ReportThe segment that is expected to dominate the market as well as the segment which holds highest CAGR in the forecast periodRegions/Countries that are expected to witness the fastest growth rates during the forecast periodThe latest developments, market shares, and strategies that are employed by the major market playersWant Full Report?Enquire [email protected] https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/inquire-before-buying/?dbmr=global-iot-internet-of-things-for-public-safety-market     Key insights in the report:Complete and distinct analysis of the market drivers and restraintsKey Market players involved in this industryDetailed analysis of the Market SegmentationCompetitive analysis of the key players involvedAbout Us: Data Bridge Market Research set forth itself as an unconventional and neoteric Market research and consulting firm with unparalleled level of resilience and integrated approaches.We are determined to unearth the best market opportunities and foster efficient information for your business to thrive in the market.Data Bridge Market Research provides appropriate solutions to the complex business challenges and initiates an effortless decision-making process.Contact:Data Bridge Market ResearchUS: +1 888 387 2818   Related Reports:IoT in Manufacturing Marketoperational analytics market
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The BBC has received more than 8,000 complaints over a BBC Breakfast report about migrants crossing the Channel shown earlier this month.The segment, which aired on the breakfast show on 10 August, saw reporter Simon Jones broadcast live from a boat that had pulled alongside a dinghy with migrants on board.He said: “We have seen them trying to get water out of the boat, they’re doing that at the moment, they are using a plastic container to try to bail out the boat.“Obviously it’s pretty overloaded there. People are wearing life jackets, it is pretty dangerous, just the number of people on board that boat.”After asking whether they were safe, Jones remained with the boat until those on board were picked up by the UK Border Force.Some 8,340 complaints were made to the broadcaster on the grounds that viewers felt the programme showed “offensive/insensitive coverage of migrants crossing the Channel by boat”.READ MORE: Black Professionals Call For 24-Hour BBC Boycott Over N-Word Use BBC Apologises Over Use Of The N-Word In News Report BBC News Boss Predicts TV Bulletins Could Be Axed As Audiences Move Online In response, a BBC spokesperson said: “This report was a stark illustration of the significant risks some people are prepared to take to reach the UK.“Channel crossings is a topic of huge importance and we always endeavour to cover the story sensitively.“In this instance the Dover Coastguard were aware of the boat before our crew spoke to them and at no point did they, or those in the boat signal that a rescue operation was required.“The Coastguards instead alerted Border Force, who then safely picked up the occupants and took them to shore.”Earlier this month, the BBC received almost 19,000 complaints about the uncensored use of the N-word in a report about a racist attack in Bristol. The broadcaster initially failed to apologise following the criticism, which sparked a further backlash, before director general Lord Tony Hall later admitted it had “made a mistake”.
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IOT for Public Safety Market is used for improving the infrastructure of the city, for crime detection and prevention, also helps in the managing the disasters and calamities.Also to improve the way police recognize and then respond to crime, Internet of Things solutions can also stop illegal activity from happening.Asia Pacific IOT (internet of things) for public safety market is expected to reach million by 2026 and is projected to register a healthy CAGR of 16.5% in the forecast period of 2019 to 2026.Get Sample Report at : https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/request-a-sample/?dbmr=asia-pacific-iot-internet-of-things-for-public-safety-marketCompetitive Analysis: Asia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety   MarketSome of the major players operating in this market are Hitachi Vantara Corporation, Microsoft, IBM, NEC Corporation, ThroughTek Co., Ltd, Iskratel, Securens, SmartCone Technologies Inc., KOVA Corporation, ESRI, Cradlepoint, Inc., ENDEAVOUR TECHNOLOGY, X-Systems, West Corporation, Carbyne, Star Controls, Inc., Cisco Systems, Inc., Sierra Wireless , Telit, Nokia and others.Key Pointers Covered in the Asia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Trends and Forecast to 2026Asia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market New Sales VolumesAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Replacement Sales VolumesAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Installed BaseAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market By BrandsAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market SizeAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Procedure VolumesAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Product Price AnalysisAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Healthcare OutcomesAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Cost of Care AnalysisAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Regulatory Framework and ChangesAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Prices and Reimbursement AnalysisAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Shares in Different RegionsRecent Developments for Asia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market CompetitorsAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Upcoming ApplicationsAsia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety Market Innovators StudyGet Detailed TOC:https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/toc/?dbmr=asia-pacific-iot-internet-of-things-for-public-safety-marketScope of the  IOT for Public Safety   MarketAsia Pacific IOT (Internet of Things) for Public Safety Market, By Component (Solutions, Platform and Service), End User (Industrial IoT, Connected Healthcare, Smart Transportation, Smart Utilities, Smart Building and Home Automation, Homeland Security and Others), Application (Surveillance and Security, Disaster Management and Critical Infrastructure Security), Country (Japan, China, South Korea, India, Australia, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Rest Of Asia-Pacific) Industry Trends and Forecast to 2026Asia Pacific IoT(internet of things) for public safety market assists in predicting the cyberattacks, natural calamities and other dangerous attacks that can negatively impact the economy as a whole and also it helps in mitigating the risks for the governments, and people.There are various reasons due to which IoT are considered for public safety such as developing smart cities, smart parking, and other smart solutions for the benefit and safety of public.Market Segmentation: Asia-Pacific  IOT for Public Safety  MarketOn the basis of component, the market is segmented into solutions, platform and service.The platform is sub-segmented into application management, device management, and network management.The service is sub-segmented into system integration services, consulting services, support and maintenance services.
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SpaceX returned two NASA astronauts to Earth on Sunday after flying them to the International Space Station. The mission, called Demo-2, flew the first crewed US spacecraft since the end of NASA's space shuttle program in 2011. SpaceX's Crew Dragon spaceship is a product of NASA's Commercial Crew program, a partnership between the space agency and private companies. Boeing is also building a spaceship as part of the program, but SpaceX's progressed faster. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. SpaceX and NASA celebrated a major milestone on Sunday: the completion of the world's first crewed commercial spaceflight. The company's Crew Dragon spaceship carried two NASA astronauts into orbit and docked to the space station two months ago, then returned on Sunday in a fiery plunge through Earth's atmosphere. The mission, called Demo-2, was the last major test before NASA certifies the Crew Dragon to carry more people into space. "This day heralds a new age of space exploration," Elon Musk, SpaceX's CEO, said during a NASA TV broadcast after the splashdown, adding, "I'm not very religious, but I prayed for this one." Since NASA ended its space-shuttle program in 2011, the agency has relied exclusively on Russia to ferry its astronauts to and from orbit in Soyuz spacecraft. But those seats have gotten increasingly expensive, and the world's space agencies have had no alternative for launching and returning astronauts, even when technical glitches have arisen. That's what spurred NASA to launch its Commercial Crew program, which was designed to facilitate the development of new American-made spacecraft. The program put private firms in competition for billions of dollars' worth of government contracts. SpaceX and Boeing came out on top, and SpaceX's spaceship passed its tests and became ready for astronauts first. Here's how NASA came to rely on the two companies to resurrect American spaceflight.SEE ALSO: 27 epic images show how SpaceX made history by flying NASA astronauts to and from the space station DON'T MISS: Telescope video captured SpaceX's Crew Dragon spaceship attached to space station, 250 miles above Earth NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken are now the first people ever to fly in a commercial spacecraft. Both men are spaceflight veterans and were deeply involved in SpaceX's efforts to design its Crew Dragon spaceship. "This has been a quite an odyssey the last five, six, seven, eight years," Hurley said during a NASA live broadcast after the recent landing. "To be where we are now — the first crewed flight of Dragon — is just unbelievable." Crew Dragon launched into space with the two astronauts inside atop a Falcon 9 rocket on May 30. The mission, called Demo-2, was a demonstrate meant to show that the launch system and spaceship could safely transport people. The next day, the capsule docked to the International Space Station, where it stayed for two months. Aboard the space station, Behnken and Hurley conducted science experiments, routine maintenance, and a couple of spacewalks. On Saturday, Behnken and Hurley climbed back into the capsule, which they'd named Endeavour, and undocked from the space station. The next day, they survived a fiery plunge back to Earth. "It felt like we were inside of an animal," Behnken said in a briefing on Tuesday. Parachutes slowed the fall, and Endeavour landed in the Gulf of Mexico at 2:48 p.m. ET on Sunday, off the coast of Pensacola, Florida. Recovery teams helped the astronauts out of the capsule and gave them a medical check. The men were fine but found it difficult to stand; that's normal for ISS astronauts, since their bodies become accustomed to floating in space. Prior to the Demo-2 mission, the last US rocket-and-spaceship system to carry astronauts to and from space was Atlantis, NASA's last space shuttle. It launched and landed in July 2011. After 135 shuttle missions, NASA retired the program so it could direct funds towards long-term missions to the moon and, eventually, Mars. Since then, NASA has relied on Russia's Soyuz system to ferry its astronauts to and from the International Space Station. Soyuz has been the only human-rated spacecraft that can ferry people to and from the $150 billion, football-field-size orbiting laboratory.  Russia has nearly quadrupled its prices for NASA over a decade. In 2008, a single round-trip flight for a NASA astronaut cost about $22 million; by 2018, that price had soared to about $81 million. As of late last year the price is about $85 million, according to CNN. Additionally, two recent incidents raised concerns about the reliability and safety of Soyuz rockets. In August 2018, a Soyuz began leaking air into space while attached to the space station. A small hole was found and investigated by cosmonauts. Russian authorities think the hole came from a manufacturing accident with a drill that was hastily covered up. Then that October, a Soyuz rocket failed during launch. The space capsule, which was carrying one American and one Russian, automatically jettisoned away, and they walked away uninjured. Despite these issues, the world's space agencies had no other options for getting their astronauts to and from the space station. NASA's Commercial Crew Program has been developing alternative launch systems since 2010. The competition asked private companies to build new astronaut-ready spacecraft. Once the program is complete, the agency will have doled out more than $8 billion in awards and contracts over about a decade. "We don't want to purchase, own, and operate the hardware the way we used to. We want to be one customer of many customers in a very robust commercial marketplace in low-Earth orbit," Jim Bridenstine, NASA's administrator, said ahead of the Demo-2 landing. From dozens of hopefuls, two contenders made it through the competition: SpaceX and Boeing. Both of their spacecraft are designed to fly up to seven passengers to and from Earth's orbit. SpaceX, which Musk founded in 2002, designed the Crew Dragon, a 14,000-pound spaceship that's made to be reusable. The vehicle is SpaceX's biggest spaceflight achievement yet, but it's just the beginning of Musk's ambitions. "This is hopefully the first step on a journey towards civilization on Mars, of life becoming multiplanetary, a base on the moon, and expanding beyond Earth," he told reporters after the Demo-2 launch. Boeing, a century-old aerospace company, created the CST-100 Starliner, also a reusable capsule. It's made to land back on Earth using airbags, rather than splashing into the ocean. Before Boeing launches astronauts on the the CST-100 Starliner, it will re-do an uncrewed flight test, since the first attempt unearthed critical issues. In total, NASA selected nine astronauts to fly the Boeing and SpaceX spaceships on the demonstration missions and first official crewed missions. The group includes former space-shuttle flyers, ex-military test pilots, rookies, and — critically — four astronauts (including Behnken and Hurley) who'd been testing and providing feedback on the commercial ships for years. Before humans could fly in the new spacecraft, NASA required a robust series of test flights and demonstrations. In one such test, the Crew Dragon flew to the space station without a crew in March 2019 — making it the first commercial vehicle to ever do so. In that mission, called Demo-1, the spaceship launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, then linked up to the International Space Station for five days. The only passengers were a crash-test dummy named Ripley, 400 pounds of cargo, and a fuzzy toy Earth. Officials declared the test a complete success after the capsule splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida. Bridenstine described the successful mission as "the dawn of a new era in American human spaceflight, and really in spaceflight for the entire world." But later demos hit snags. SpaceX did not pass an April 2019 test that simulated a parachute failure. The test was meant to examine what would happen if one parachute didn't deploy during a flight. SpaceX tried to simulate the situation, leaving only three parachutes to break the fall. Unfortunately, the other parachutes didn't properly deploy, either. However, the Crew Dragon parachutes eventually received approval after undergoing 27 rounds of testing. They performed as planned when Behnken and Hurley landed. William Gerstenmaier, NASA's associate administrator for human exploration and operations at the time, told Spaceflight Now that similar problems arose during Boeing's parachute tests. That same month, a Crew Dragon capsule exploded during a test-firing on the ground. NASA and SpaceX both welcomed the surprise failure. The mysterious explosion occurred as the capsule fired the large engines designed to help it escape a failing rocket. "Ensuring that our systems meet rigorous safety standards and detecting anomalies like this prior to flight are the main reasons why we test," SpaceX said on the day of the failure. Kathy Lueders, who managed the Commercial Crew Program and now leads NASA's Human Spaceflight Office, called the explosion "a huge gift for us" in terms of making the ship safer to fly. Boeing launched its Starliner capsule toward the space station for the first time in December 2019. Nobody was inside — just a mannequin named Rosie. There was also some food, Christmas presents, and other cargo for astronauts aboard the space station. But the Starliner suffered a major glitch with a clock about 31 minutes after launch, causing it to veer off-course. To save the uncrewed ship from total failure, Boeing skipped its docking with the space station — the main objective of the mission — and used the remaining propellant to stabilize the capsule's orbit and get it home. On its early return to Earth, the capsule relied on impact-absorbing airbags to land safely in the desert. A NASA safety panel revealed in February that the Starliner had also suffered a second software issue, which ground controllers patched in the middle of the test flight. Boeing and NASA officials said the error could have caused a collision between two units of the spacecraft: the crew module and the service module. The error prompted NASA to launch a larger investigation into Boeing's coding and culture.   NASA and Boeing have decided to re-do that uncrewed mission before the company launches its first astronauts. The re-do is planned for October or November, according to The Washington Post, but officials have declined to offer a timeline for the Starliner's first astronaut flight. Before they could carry people, both spaceships also had to prove they can jettison astronauts to safety in the unlikely event of a rocket-launch failure. Such failures have happened to both the Space Shuttle and Soyuz systems, so having an escape plan is essential. Boeing passed the ground test of the Starliner's abort system in November 2019. The capsule rocketed nearly a mile into the air, then parachuted back to the ground. The entire flight lasted 1.5 minutes. SpaceX demonstrated its escape system in January, by turning off one of its Falcon 9 rockets mid-flight while a Crew Dragon was perched on top. The rocket was traveling at around twice the speed of sound when SpaceX shut it down. At that moment, the Crew Dragon detached, fired its own thrusters, and sped away from the soon-to-explode rocket. The ship landed in the ocean under four giant parachutes. "It went as well as one could possibly expect," Musk said of the escape-system demonstration.     Overall, the Commercial Crew program has run years past its deadline. Boeing and SpaceX were supposed to have their systems certified by 2017, according to a report from the Government Accountability Office. "Most of us are just way past ready for this to happen. It has taken a lot longer than anybody thought," Wayne Hale, a retired NASA space-shuttle program manager, told Business Insider in January. Eventually, a round-trip seat on the Crew Dragon is expected to cost about $55 million. A seat on Starliner will cost about $90 million. NASA has contracted six round-trip flights on Crew Dragon. Behnken's wife, Megan McArthur, will pilot the second one. "What we did for Bob, I think we can do an even better job for Megan," SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell said after the Demo-2 splashdown. NASA also plans to open the space station to tourists for $35,000 per night. Last year NASA announced it would allow two private astronauts per year to stay up to 30 days each on the space station.   Holly Secon contributed reporting. Do you have a story or inside information to share about the spaceflight industry? Send Dave Mosher an email at [email protected] or a Twitter direct message at @davemosher. More secure communication options are listed here.
SpaceX on Tuesday launched and landed a vehicle called SN5, which is a full-scale prototype of a planned Mars rocket ship called Starship. On Wednesday, US President Donald Trump wrongfully appeared to take credit for the privately developed vehicle's creation or launch. Trump also shared falsehoods about NASA, which spaceflight experts pointed out and corrected. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. SpaceX on Tuesday night launched an early prototype of a Starship rocket hundreds of feet into the air, hovered it across the beachside launch site, and then landed it on a concrete pad. The full-scale vehicle, called Starship SN5 (for serial number 5), looked more like a flying grain silo or beer can than an early version of a Mars-bound rocket. Still, the feat represents a key step toward SpaceX founder Elon Musk's dream of creating a fully reusable space vehicle that can reach, return from, and help populate the Red Planet. In Wednesday tweet rife with falsehoods, US President Donald Trump reshared a NASASpaceFlight video of SN5's flight — and appeared to take credit for SpaceX's flight by insinuating it was part of a NASA program. "NASA was Closed & Dead until I got it going again. Now it is the most vibrant place of its kind on the Planet...And we have Space Force to go along with it. We have accomplished more than any Administration in first 3 1/2 years. Sorry, but it all doesn't happen with Sleepy Joe!" Trump claimed. After the tweet, numerous spaceflight journalists and industry experts pointed out that Trump was far from the mark. Jeff Foust, a Space News senior writer and aerospace analyst who's followed the industry for decades, tweeted the following response to the president's claims: "Fact check:- NASA was neither closed nor dead at the start of the current administration.- Many recent NASA successes have their origins in prior administrations.- The Starship test the president is retweeting has nothing to do with NASA; it's a private effort by SpaceX." Per Foust's first point, NASA has been operating continuously since its creation on October 1, 1958. With his second bullet point, Foust was referring to spaceflight commercialization work by the Bush and Obama administrations that preceded Trump by more than a decade. In 2004, President George W. Bush started a commercial cargo-spaceship development program at NASA. The goal was to bolster cargo transportation capabilities to the International Space Station ahead of the 2011 retirement of NASA's space shuttle program. That effort, which funded SpaceX to develop an uncrewed vehicle called Dragon, preceded and informed a follow-on NASA effort called Commercial Crew. President Barack Obama first funded the program in 2009 and authorized funding until he left office in 2016. That funding enabled SpaceX (and Boeing) to develop a crewed vehicle. That effort culminated in SpaceX's most recent achievement: resurrecting crewed spaceflight from American soil. Specifically, the company leaned on $2.7 billion, most of which was awarded by 2014, to develop its Crew Dragon spaceship. The vehicle launched in May with two astronauts on board and landed in August, successfully completing its first spaceflight with people. "This does a disservice to the nearly 17,000 dedicated women and men of @NASA," Phil Larson, a former SpaceX employee, tweeted in response to Trump's claims. SpaceX has some funding and assistance from NASA for Starship development, such as orbital refilling of fuel tanks. The company also was awarded a $100 million contract to develop a Starship moon-landing system. However, to date SpaceX has predominantly and privately raised hundreds of millions of dollars to fund Starship's development. Musk has also ordered many of the rocket company's thousands of employees to prioritize the vehicle's development effort at SpaceX's commercial launch site in Boca Chica, Texas — a private, non-governmental facility. The Biden campaign declined to comment on the matter and instead provided a prior statement from the Democratic candidate about the splashdown of Demo-2, congratulating those involved. Spokespeople for the White House and SpaceX did not immediately respond to requests for comment from Business Insider. A NASA spokesperson said the agency is looking into the matter. SEE ALSO: 3 Apollo astronauts say they support Trump's plan to land people on the moon — but NASA would need to make two big changes DON'T MISS: A boat flying a Trump flag approached SpaceX's spaceship after the astronauts landed. NASA promised to 'do a better job' next time. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why NASA waited nearly a decade to send astronauts into space from the US
SpaceX's Crew Dragon spaceship splashed into the Gulf of Mexico on Sunday, returning NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley from a high-stakes mission to the space station. The demonstration mission resurrected US human spaceflight after a nine-year hiatus. The astronauts were the first people to fly in a commercial spaceship. Here are 27 incredible photos from their journey. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. SpaceX and NASA made history on Sunday when a toasted, gumdrop-shaped spaceship splashed into the Gulf of Mexico. The Crew Dragon capsule — designed by SpaceX with funding from NASA — was returning astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to Earth after an unprecedented mission to the International Space Station. It was the first time a private company had taken humans into space. But this was just a demonstration mission. Its success tees NASA up to ferry astronauts regularly to and from the space station aboard the Crew Dragon.  "This day heralds a new age of space exploration," Elon Musk, SpaceX CEO, said in a briefing after the splashdown, adding, "I'm not very religious, but I prayed for this one." Here are the best photos from the launch, the astronauts' time in space, and their fiery plunge back to Earth.SEE ALSO: NASA astronaut Megan McArthur, whose husband just flew on SpaceX's Crew Dragon, will pilot the spaceship in the spring DON'T MISS: Meet Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken, 2 'badass' astronauts, engineers, and 'space dads' who flew SpaceX's Crew Dragon to orbit and back Behnken and Hurley were the first people ever to fly a commercial spacecraft. Their mission, called Demo-2, revived the US's ability to launch and fly its own astronauts, which it lost after the Space Shuttle program ended in 2011. For the last nine years, NASA relied on increasingly expensive Russian Soyuz rockets to ferry its astronauts to and from the space station On May 30, Behnken and Hurley climbed into the Crew Dragon and launched into space atop one of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rockets. They had first attempted the launch three days earlier, but cloudy weather made it unsafe for the rocket to fly. On both launch days, the astronauts were helped into their spacesuits at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The men said goodbye to their families. Both are married to astronauts, and they each have a young son. NASA TV microphones picked up Behnken telling his son: "Be good for mom. Make her life easy." The astronauts couldn't hug their families because they had just spent two weeks in quarantine to ensure they didn't accidentally carry COVID-19 to the space station. Behnken and Hurley had been working with SpaceX for five years as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The program is NASA's solution to the void left by the space shuttles . It funded both SpaceX and Boeing to build human-grade commercial spaceships, but SpaceX got to its crewed flight first. In a press briefing ahead of the launch, Behnken told Business Insider that he and Hurley had gained more insight into the ways the mission could fail "than any crew has in recent history, just in terms of understanding the different scenarios that are at play." Inside Crew Dragon before they launched, NASA's livestream showed the astronauts closing their eyes and taking deep breaths as they waited for the final countdown. NASA had estimated a 1-in-276 chance that the mission would be fatal. Behnken said that they were "really comfortable" with those odds. The rocket lifted off at 3:22 p.m. ET, then the Crew Dragon capsule separated from the body of the Falcon 9. On Earth, teams from SpaceX and NASA celebrated the success. "I'm really quite overcome with emotion," Musk told reporters. "I've spent 18 years working toward this goal, so it's hard to believe that it's happened," Musk added. "This is hopefully the first step on a journey towards civilization on Mars, of life becoming multiplanetary, a base on the moon, and expanding beyond Earth." Once they were safely orbiting Earth, Behnken and Hurley named their Crew Dragon capsule "Endeavour" — a tribute to the last space shuttle ever built. The next day, Endeavour opened its nose cone and docked to the space station. After a hatch-opening procedure that took about two hours, Behnken and Hurley floated onto the ISS. Their new crewmates — NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner — were waiting to welcome them. Upon arrival, they displayed a trophy for SpaceX: a US flag that the last space shuttle crew left on the ISS. It waited nine years for NASA's next human launch from US soil. They effectively claimed victory for SpaceX in a game of capture the flag that Barack Obama started when he developed the Commercial Crew Program. The spaceship remained docked to the ISS for the next two months. It was designed to survive up to 110 days in the harsh environment of space. While on the ISS, Behnken and Hurley worked on science experiments that NASA conducts in microgravity. Behnken and Cassidy went on a couple of spacewalks together. They did routine maintenance outside the station: replacing batteries, installing new equipment, and removing old parts. Then came the high-stakes final leg of the Demo-2 mission: coming home. Behnken and Hurley crawled back into the Crew Dragon on Saturday, August 1, and undocked from the space station. After a night's rest for the astronauts (and several hours of maneuvering the spaceship), the Endeavour capsule fired its thrusters and pushed itself into Earth's atmosphere on Sunday.   Musk had previously said the blistering, 3,500-degree-Fahrenheit plunge through Earth's atmosphere was his "biggest concern." That's because of the capsule's asymmetric design, which is necessary for the emergency-escape system that jettisons the capsule away if a launching rocket fails in midair.  "If you rotate too much, then you could potentially catch the plasma in the super Draco escape thruster pods," Musk told Aviation Week's Irene Klotz in May, a few days before the launch. "We've looked at this six ways to Sunday, so it's not that I think this will fail. It's just that I worry a bit that it is asymmetric on the backshell." At the end of the astronauts' descent, parachutes slowed the fall. The capsule landed in the Gulf of Mexico at 2:48 p.m. ET on Sunday, off the coast of Pensacola, Florida. SpaceX and NASA teams in speedboats rushed to recover the capsule and pull the astronauts out — but civilian onlookers in their own boats swarmed the scene, too. "Maybe next time we shouldn't announce our landing zone," the SpaceX engineer Kate Tice said during NASA's live feed of the landing. Even cosmonaut Ivan Vagner — the astronauts' former crewmate on the International Space Station — could see the boats speeding toward the capsule from 250 miles above Earth. Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1290014627087167496?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw [email protected] и @Astro_Doug, I congratulate you on your successful return to Earth! A few minutes after landing, the ISS flew over the #CrewDragon splashdown site in the Gulf of Mexico. pic.twitter.com/MZugsCt8tw In a statement to CBS, the Coast Guard said it warned boaters multiple times ahead of the splashdown with radio alerts and physical warnings, yet lacked an order to legally enforce a hazard zone. "Numerous boaters ignored the Coast Guard crews' requests and decided to encroach the area, putting themselves and those involved in the operation in potential danger," the statement said. Some of the boats passed close to the capsule, including one with a passenger waving a Trump flag. NASA officials said this was dangerous for the astronauts and the onlookers.   That's because the Endeavour capsule can be shrouded in poisonous fumes after it plummets through Earth's atmosphere.  The crowd "was not what we were anticipating," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a briefing after the splashdown.  "That's not something that is good," he added. "We need to make sure that we're warning people not to get close to the spacecraft in the future."   After clearing away the unauthorized boats, the recovery team lifted the toasted capsule out of the water. The team picked up a dangerous gas around the capsule called nitrogen tetroxide. They waited for it to clear before opening the spaceship's hatch. The recovery team then helped Behnken and Hurley out of their seats and onto stretchers — a standard procedure for astronauts post-landing — so they could get immediate medical evaluations. The men were fine but found it difficult to stand after the splashdown. That's normal for ISS astronauts, since their bodies become accustomed to floating in space and suddenly have to work much harder to move against Earth's gravity. A helicopter took Behnken and Hurley to dry land. "This has been a quite an odyssey the last five, six, seven, eight years," Hurley told team members and press shortly after the landing. "When the space shuttles retired, when Doug took his final flight to wrap that up, I think it was a sad day for us," Behnken said. "There's something special about having that capability to launch and bring your own astronauts home." Dave Mosher contributed reporting.
NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley just completed a crucial test flight of SpaceX's new Crew Dragon spaceship. The men splashed the space capsule into the Gulf of Mexico at 2:48 p.m. ET off the coast of Pensacola, Florida, following a risky plunge through Earth's atmosphere. NASA's administrator said the mission marks "the next era in human spaceflight," since the agency is now poised to purchase flights from SpaceX. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said after the mission's launch that he once doubted the company would ever see this day. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. SpaceX just achieved a feat that even CEO Elon Musk thought improbable when he founded the rocket company in 2002: flying people to and from space. On Sunday afternoon, NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley safely careened back to Earth after a 27-million-mile mission in orbit around the planet. The men flew in SpaceX's new Crew Dragon spaceship, landing the cone-shaped capsule at 2:48 p.m. ET in the Gulf of Mexico near Pensacola, Florida. Ahead of the landing, the crew undocked from the $150 billion International Space Station, where they'd spent 63 days, then performed a series of maneuvers to return home to their families. The capsule handily survived a blistering 3,500-degree-Fahrenheit return through Earth's atmosphere, a high-stakes parachute deployment, and the final splashdown. Shortly after 4 p.m. ET, a SpaceX and NASA recovery crew pulled the astronauts from their toasted ship.  "Thanks for doing the most difficult part and the most important part of human spaceflight: sending us into orbit and bringing us home safely," Behnken said shortly before leaving the spaceship, which he and Hurley named Endeavour. "Thank you again for the good ship Endeavour." "It's absolutely been an honor and a pleasure to work with you, from the entire SpaceX team," a capsule communicator responded from mission control at SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, California. SpaceX privately designed, built, and operated the vehicle with about $2.7 billion in contracts from NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The money helped SpaceX create its newfound spaceflight capability and is funding about half a dozen missions — including Behnken and Hurley's demonstration flight, Demo-2, which launched on May 30. With Demo-2's completion, SpaceX has put an end to a nine-year drought of crewed spaceflight from US soil. The company also resurrected NASA's ability to reach the ISS, where the agency hopes to ramp up work to help it return humans to the moon and eventually reach Mars. The mission's end likely brings SpaceX just weeks from a NASA certification of its Crew Dragon for regular flights of astronauts — and private citizens. "We don't want to purchase, own, and operate the hardware the way we used to. We want to be one customer of many customers in a very robust commercial marketplace in low-Earth orbit," Jim Bridenstine, NASA's administrator, said during a NASA TV broadcast ahead of the landing. He added: "This is the next era in human spaceflight, where NASA gets to be the customer. We want to be a strong customer, we want to be a great partner. But we don't want to be the only ones that are operating with humans in space." In a news briefing following the landing, officials and astronauts remarked on how uneventful the astronaut's return flight was (except for a few surprises on the ground, such as civilian boats pulling up to the space capsule). "It did not seem like this was the first NASA SpaceX mission with astronauts on board," Michael Hopkins, a NASA astronaut who's slated to fly on SpaceX's next mission, Crew-1, said. "It seemed to go extremely smoothly." Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX's president and CEO, said even SpaceX leadership was a bit taken aback. "I think we're surprised — minorly surprised, but obviously incredibly pleased — that this went as smoothly as it did," she said. American astronauts, rockets, and spaceships launching from US soil Before Demo-2, the United States hadn't launched humans into space from American soil since July 2011, when NASA flew its final space shuttle mission. During the following nine years, NASA had to rely on Russia's Soyuz launch system to ferry its astronauts to and from the space station. But that became increasingly expensive. Over time, Russia charged more and more per round-trip ticket for each NASA astronaut. The cost rose from about $21 million in 2008 (before the shuttle was retired) to more than $90 million per seat on a planned flight for October. A seat on SpaceX's Crew Dragon, meanwhile, is projected to cost $55 million (not including NASA's $2.7 billion in funding), according to NASA's inspector general. Also, with just one to two seats for NASA astronauts aboard each Soyuz flight — compared to the space shuttle's seven — the arrangement limited American use of the ISS, which has housed as many as 13 people at once (though space-station crews are typically six people). Most concerning to mission managers, the arrangement left NASA reliant on a single launch system. That became especially worrisome when high-profile issues arose with Soyuz over the past few years, including a mysterious leak and a rocket-launch failure that forced an emergency landing. After these incidents, NASA and other space agencies had nowhere else to turn.  With SpaceX's successful Demo-2 flight — and the upcoming test flights of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spaceship — that insecure footing for US astronauts is now in the rearview mirror. "This is the culmination of a dream," SpaceX CEO Elon Musk told "CBS This Morning" ahead of the mission's launch in May. "This is a dream come true. In fact, it feels surreal." In addition to giving NASA better access to the space station, having a spacecraft and launch system enables the agency to use the space station's microgravity environment to conduct more science experiments — in pharmaceuticals, materials science, astronomy, medicine, and more. "The International Space Station is a critical capability for the United States of America. Having access to it is also critical," Bridenstine said during a briefing on May 1. "We are moving forward very rapidly with this program that is so important to our nation and, in fact, to the entire world." Demo-2 brings SpaceX one step closer to the moon and Mars With the completion of Demo-2, SpaceX has also gained operational experience flying people to and from space for the first time. That's hugely important to Musk, who has big plans for SpaceX. The company plans to fly tourists into space: In February, SpaceX announced that it had sold four seats through a spaceflight tourism company called Space Adventures. Then in March, news broke that the company Axiom Space — led in part by a former ISS mission manager at NASA — had also signed a deal with SpaceX. There's even a flight of actor Tom Cruise aboard Crew Dragon in the works — part of a plan to film a movie aboard the ISS. But Musk's primary aim is to launch people around the moon, later land others on the lunar surface, then move on to establish Martian cities. His ultimate goal is to put 1 million settlers on the red planet. NASA shares some of Musk's ambitions to send humans back to the moon and eventually to Mars. Sending astronauts to the space station aboard the Crew Dragon represents a major milestone toward those goals. Bridenstine also said  that he'd eventually like to see entire commercial space stations in the future.  "The next big thing is we need commercial space stations themselves. And in order to create the market for commercial space stations, we have to have these transformational capabilities," Bridenstine said ahead of the landing. 'I doubted us, too' During a briefing following the launch of Demo-2, Business Insider asked Musk if he had a message for those who ever doubted him or the company. "To be totally frank, I doubted us, too. I thought we had maybe — when starting SpaceX — maybe had a 10% chance of reaching orbit. So to those who doubted us I was like, 'Well, I think you're probably right,'" Musk said. He added: "It took us took us four attempts just to get to orbit with Falcon 1 ... People told me this joke: How do you make a small fortune in the rocket industry? 'You start with a large one' is the punch line." Musk said SpaceX "just barely made it there," adding, "So hey, I think those doubters were — their probability assessment was correct. But fortunately, fate has smiled upon us and brought us to this day." This story has been updated with new information. It was originally published at 2:48 p.m. ET on August 2, 2020. Do you have a story or inside information to share about the spaceflight industry? Send Dave Mosher an email at [email protected] or a Twitter direct message at @davemosher. More secure communication options are listed here.SEE ALSO: Why SpaceX's astronaut mission for NASA is such a big deal for Elon Musk's rocket company and the US as a whole DON'T MISS: SpaceX is about to win a high-stakes game of capture the flag that Barack Obama started 9 years ago Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why NASA waited nearly a decade to send astronauts into space from the US
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The historic Demo-2 mission makes a clean water landing in the Gulf of Mexico and the crew exits the capsule.
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Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley made history getting to the space station aboard a Crew Dragon capsule. They've undocked from the ISS and are coming home.
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