MoreA 3D plastic representation of the Facebook logo is seen in this illustration in Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, May 13, 2015.The discussions underscored the central but difficult role some of the world's most influential companies now play in addressing issues such as terrorism, free speech and the lines between government and corporate authority.WARY OF OUTSIDE SOLUTIONThe April call was led by Facebook's head of global policy management, Monika Bickert, sources with knowledge of the call said.The anti-extremism group was founded by, among others, Frances Townsend, who advised former president George W. Bush on homeland security, and Mark Wallace, who was deputy campaign manager for the Bush 2004 re-election campaign.Other alternatives raised on the call included establishing a new industry-controlled nonprofit or expanding an existing industry-controlled nonprofit.The model for an industry-funded organization might be the nonprofit National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, which identifies known child pornography images using a system known as PhotoDNA.
In late April, amid pressure from President Barack Obama and other US and European leaders concerned about online radicalization, internet companies including Alphabet Inc s YouTube, Twitter Inc, Facebook Inc and CloudFlare held a call to discuss options, including a content-blocking system put forward by the private Counter Extremism Project, according to one person on the call and three who were briefed on what was discussed.The discussions underscored the central but difficult role some of the world s most influential companies now play in addressing issues such as terrorism, free speech and the lines between government and corporate authority.The April call was led by Facebook s head of global policy management, Monika Bickert, sources with knowledge of the call said.The anti-extremism group was founded by, among others, Frances Townsend, who advised former president George W Bush on homeland security, and Mark Wallace, who was deputy campaign manager for the Bush 2004 re-election campaign.Other alternatives raised on the call included establishing a new industry-controlled non-profit or expanding an existing industry-controlled non-profit.The model for an industry-funded organization might be the non-profit National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, which identifies known child pornography images using a system known as PhotoDNA.
In late April, amid pressure from U.S. President Barack Obama and other U.S. and European leaders concerned about online radicalization, internet companies including Alphabet Inc s YouTube, Twitter Inc, Facebook Inc and CloudFlare held a call to discuss options, including a content-blocking system put forward by the private Counter Extremism Project, according to one person on the call and three who were briefed on what was discussed.The discussions underscored the central but difficult role some of the world s most influential companies now play in addressing issues such as terrorism, free speech and the lines between government and corporate authority.The April call was led by Facebook s head of global policy management, Monika Bickert, sources with knowledge of the call said.The anti-extremism group was founded by, among others, Frances Townsend, who advised former president George W. Bush on homeland security, and Mark Wallace, who was deputy campaign manager for the Bush 2004 re-election campaign.Other alternatives raised on the call included establishing a new industry-controlled nonprofit or expanding an existing industry-controlled nonprofit.The model for an industry-funded organization might be the nonprofit National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, which identifies known child pornography images using a system known as PhotoDNA.
In late April, amid pressure from US President Barack Obama and other US and European leaders concerned about online radicalization, internet companies including YouTube, Twitter , Facebook and CloudFlare held a call to discuss options, including a content-blocking system put forward by the private Counter Extremism Project, according to one person on the call and three who were briefed on what was discussed.The discussions underscored the central but difficult role some of the world's most influential companies now play in addressing issues such as terrorism, free speech and the lines between government and corporate authority.Facebook has assembled a team focused on policing terrorist material and has promoted counter-speechGoogle has said it will display counter-terrorism adverts against searches for extremist materialTelegram, an encrypted messaging app, says it has shut down Islamic State propaganda channelsAnonymous, the hacker organisation, has declared "war" on the Islamic State and claims to have helped prevent attacksNone of the companies at this point has embraced the anti-extremist group's system, and they have typically been wary of outside intervention in how their sites should be policed.The April call was led by Facebook's head of global policy management, Monika Bickert, sources with knowledge of the call said.The anti-extremism group was founded by, among others, Frances Townsend, who advised former president George W. Bush on homeland security, and Mark Wallace, who was deputy campaign manager for the Bush 2004 re-election campaign.Other alternatives raised on the call included establishing a new industry-controlled nonprofit or expanding an existing industry-controlled nonprofit.
Photo Illustration by Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images Hundreds of Activision Blizzard employees have signed a letter (published by Bloomberg, Polygon, and Kotaku) that rebukes the company’s response to California’s allegations that Activision Blizzard has a discriminatory work culture and issues with sexual harassment. The company’s response to the lawsuit, which paints an extremely upsetting picture of its culture and how women are treated there, has largely been to deny the allegations. In their letter, which can be read below, the employees say that response “creates a company atmosphere that disbelieves victims,” and they call for “immediate corrections” from the company’s top leaders. The letter was written in response to both public and internal statements made by Activision Blizzard... Continue reading…
"Our values as employees are not accurately reflected in the words and actions of our leadership," the letter from Activision employees to execs said.
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Some of the Call of Duty publisher's workers have reportedly penned a letter decrying the company's "abhorrent and insulting" response to harassment allegations.
One of the world’s biggest video game companies is reeling after a state discrimination and sexual harassment suit kicked off a firestorm of controversy within the company. California’s Department of Fair Employment and Housing sued Activision Blizzard last week, alleging that the company fostered a “breeding ground for harassment and discrimination against women.” Following a […]
The strike is on. Bloomberg’s Jason Schreier today reported that Activision-Blizzard employees are planning a work stoppage for Wednesday, 28 July, in protest of the company’s response to a recent lawsuit. On 22 July, the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing filed suit against the Santa Monica-based company. The department investigated the company and determined it fostered a “frat boy” culture, paid women less, hired women less, and worked to keep its leadership exclusively white and male. Per the affidavit: Defendants have also fostered a pervasive “frat boy” workplace culture continues to thrive. In the office, women are subjected…This story continues at The Next Web
The company behind Call of Duty and World of Warcraft has been accused of a "frat boy" workplace culture.
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