With just a week left of the administration, here we go again The Trump Administration has tried yet again to change the fine print around H-1B work visas, with the Department of Labor issuing a new rule on Tuesday that it said would “help protect the wages and job opportunities of American workers.”…
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Applicants will need to hold off until March at the earliest President Trump has thrown his anti-immigrant policies into the incoming Biden administration's lap, extending a ban on work visas until March 31.…
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Scheme to encourage hiring pricey brainiacs instead of cheap footsloggers The Trump administration has proposed changes to the H-1B visa that will see it abolish the current lottery process and instead prioritise highly paid workers.…
White House immigration restrictions knock less than half a per cent off The Trump administration's June crackdown on foreign workers with H-1B and other visas wiped $100bn off the stock market value of the largest US companies, according to boffins at The Brookings Institution, Harvard Business School, and The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.…
Tech industry may limber up for war The Trump administration has announced it will place new restrictions on the H-1B work visa program, such as narrowing eligibility for foreign workers and recomputing minimum salary levels.…
The Departments of Labor and Homeland Security reveal new rules.
Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images The Trump administration on Tuesday outlined new rules tightening restrictions placed on guest worker visa programs, including the H-1B program favored by tech industry firms. The rules tighten eligibility around foreign workers, so employers must meet more stringent criteria around the jobs they’re hiring for and how much they’re paying. That may make it harder for companies to sponsor H-1B visas and hire foreign workers as part of the annual lottery that awards 60,000 new slots every year, not including renewals for existing visa holders. The new rules follow a June order from President Donald Trump suspending a range of guest worker visa programs through the end of the year, with the White House citing domestic job losses during the... Continue reading…
Department of Labor puts $150m into computer, cyber-security training grants to plug visa hole The US Department of Labor (DoL) is offering $150m to train up unemployed Americans in IT and cyber-security in an effort to plug the skills gap caused by the Trump administration’s work visa clampdown.…
Big data and AI have become critical tools that help businesses — including major corporations — operate more efficiently and grow faster. This has led to a spike in demand for data scientists, analysts and engineers, and experts in building AI and machine learning systems. Here's how much IBM, Oracle, Cisco, Microsoft, ServiceNow, and Salesforce pay data scientists, analysts, and engineers based on disclosure data for permanent and temporary workers filed with the US Office of Foreign Labor Certification in 2019. Click here for more BI Prime stories. Artificial intelligence, or AI, was once a geeky, arcane field of study, debated in universities by academics, scientists and sci-fi nerds. That changed dramatically as AI, machine learning, and big data have led to the creation of new tools to help businesses improve the way they operate. The rise of these technologies was due to a key factor: data. Businesses — including big corporations — now have the ability to quickly access and analyze massive amounts of data to draw valuable and actionable insights. This has also led to a spike in demand for data professionals, including data scientists and analysts, and experts in AI and machine learning. Big corporations now consider AI a major revenue driver: The total value that AI will add to businesses worldwide is expected to grow from $1.9 trillion in 2019 to $3.9 trillion in 2022, according to a 2018 Gartner report. Business Insider analyzed the US Office of Foreign Labor Certification's 2020 disclosure data for permanent and temporary foreign workers to find out what six enterprise tech giants — IBM, Oracle, ServiceNow, Cisco, Salesforce and Microsoft — pay data scientists, analysts, engineers, and other professionals focused on big data, AI, and machine learning. Companies are required to disclose information such as salary ranges when they hire through the H-1B visa program. So while this list is not a comprehensive look at AI salaries (because it only includes data for foreign workers), it still provides rare insight into what these major companies are willing to shell out for talent. Note that for some positions, the companies involved only gave salary ranges, rather than specific figures. Here's how much these top enterprise-technology companies paid experts in data science and analysis and AI in 2020:SEE ALSO: Enterprise tech salaries revealed: How much Oracle, IBM, SAP, Cisco, Dell, VMware, ServiceNow and Workday pay engineers, developers, data scientists and others SEE ALSO: How much product managers are paid at enterprise giants like Oracle, Cisco, VMware, SAP, ServiceNow and Workday — and how the job is evolving IBM hired an AI engineer in Massachusetts with a salary of $180,000 IBM is considered a trailblazer in AI, with its pioneering technologies led by Deep Blue, the chess-playing computer that defeated grandmaster Gary Kasparov and Watson, its flagship AI technology.  When Arvind Krishna took over as IBM's new CEO in May, he cited AI as one of the areas that the tech giant aims to dominate under his leadership. For example, IBM is looking to use AI to boost its position in the cloud where it is up against stronger rivals led by Amazon, Microsoft and Google. This entails bringing in more data experts and professionals. Out of IBM's 1,876 total approved visa applications, here are some of its recent hires in the fields of data science and machine learning, and how much the workers get paid: Lead data scientist (New York): $123,000 to $255,000 Senior data scientist (New York): $112,000 to $222,000 AI engineer (Massachusetts): $180,000 AI solution architect, senior data scientist (Pennsylvania): $148,000 Data scientist (North Carolina): $105,000 to $213,000 Data scientist (California): $95,000 to $197,000 Data engineer (Texas): $96,000 to $132,000 Data engineer (Oregon): $85,000 to $132,000 Business intelligence data architect (Pennsylvania): $93,000 to $129,000 Big data engineer (Ohio): $91,000 to $111,000     Oracle hired a data scientist director in California with a salary between $228,000 and $290,000 Oracle stores and manages the data for many of the world's biggest corporations. The Silicon Valley powerhouse is also a major player in the enterprise software application market.  Still, to secure its future, the firm is pivoting sharply to the cloud where it faces stronger competitors such as Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. Boosting its AI and big data analytics capabilities is a key component of this strategy. Out of Oracle's 452 total approved visa applications, here are some of its recent hires focused on AI and data analytics, as well as how much they're paid: Data scientist director (California): $228,000 to $290,000 Data scientist (California): $145,000 to $199,000 Data scientist (District of Columbia): $119,000 to $189,000 Data scientist (Colorado): $112,000 to $179,000 Data scientist (New York): $112,000   ServiceNow hired a senior machine learning engineer in California with a salary of $148,00 to $190,000 ServiceNow, a pioneer of cloud computing, runs a platform that helps businesses — including major corporations — manage and automate their workflows. The Silicon Valley giant is turning to AI to improve and expand its products and services. Out of ServiceNow's 225 total approved visa applications, here are some of its recent hires focused on AI, machine learning, and big data analytics, and how much they're paid: Senior machine learning engineer (California): $148,000 to $190,000 Machine learning engineer (California): $155,000 to $210,000 Senior machine learning, full stack software engineer (California): $132,000 Senior data analyst (California): $132,000 to $140,000 Data scientist. capacity planning (Washington): $84,000  Senior data engineer (California): $73,000 Data scientist (California): $73,000   Cisco hired a data scientist in North Carolina with a salary of $124,000 to $183,000 Cisco emerged as a major enterprise tech vendor by providing the networking equipment for businesses to connect their data centers. Cisco has had to adapt to new tech trends, including the rise of software-defined networking, which enables businesses to manage networks through software, reducing the need for hardware. And like other tech giants like IBM and Oracle, Cisco has also had to adapt to the rise of the cloud, which made it possible for businesses to scale down or even abandon private data centers. AI and big data are critical to Cisco's bid to remain a strong player in a rapidly evolving enterprise market. Out of Cisco's 695 total approved visa applications, here are some of its recent hires in AI, data science, and analytics, and how much they're paid: Data architect (California): $142,000 to $216,000 Manager, data and analytics (California): $170,000 Manager, data scientist (North Carolina): $150,000 Data scientist (California): $134,000 to $204,000 Data scientist (North Carolina): $124,000 to $183,000 Data science analyst (California): $116,000 to $173,000 Senior data analyst (North Carolina): $102,000 to $137,000   Salesforce hired a data engineering senior manager focused on marketing analytics in California with a salary of $160,701 Salesforce makes software to help companies connect to their customers, and AI and machine learning are important to how it plans to evolve its products. Its artificial intelligence software Einstein helps users automate mundane tasks, track trends about customers, and predict how customers will respond to various company outreach methods.  Salesforce also acquired data analytics and visualization company Tableau in 2019 — its largest acquisition to date — to help clients make sense of all the customer data its software collects.  Of Salesforce's 1,294 total approved visa applications, here are some of its recent hires in data science, analytics, and engineering, and how much they're paid: Data analyst (Texas): $96,470 Data engineering senior manager - marketing analytics (California): $160,701 Data scientist (California): $118,581 Data scientist (Massachusetts): $117,478 Lead engineer, data science (California): $194,397 Senior analyst, data quality & governance (Illinois): $120,474 Sr. analyst, GTM data operations & analytics (California): $110,094 Senior big data engineer (Washington): $94,203 Microsoft hired a senior data and applied scientist in Washington with a salary of $158,105. Microsoft is investing heavily in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and big data across all its product lines. The goal is to incorporate AI and machine learning into products in a way that helps customers work better.  Out of Microsoft's 4,134 total approved visa applications, 365 of those foreign workers were for data and applied scientist roles. Here are of its recent hires in data analytics, applied science, and machine learning, and how much they're paid: Data analyst (Washington): $130,000 Data and applied scientist (Washington): $175,958 Data and applied scientist (California):$165,000 Data and applied scientist (Texas): $135,000 Senior data and applied scientist (Washington): $158,105 Data scientist (Massachusetts): $150,000 Machine learning engineer (Washington): $140,000 Senior data engineer (Washington): $175,500 Delivery data scientist (New York): $115,700
Donald Trump's new visa restrictions could make international residents and H-1B visa holders look for jobs elsewhere, which presents a unique opportunity for Europe's growing tech hubs to land top talent, experts say. European startups could benefit greatly from recruiting Silicon "Valley veterans," they say. Visa applications to work in UK tech are at record levels — it's not yet clear whether this is linked to Trump's decision. Priya Lakhani, CEO of startup CENTURY Tech, says the UK is an attractive option for workers, thanks to its thriving English-speaking ecosystem, flexibility from the UK's Tech Nation Visa, and focus on research and development.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. When President Donald Trump signed an executive order last month that froze new H-1B visa for foreign workers through the end of the year, the country's biggest tech companies, who lure talented workers from overseas, were devastated. Google CEO Sundar Pichai, Apple CEO Tim Cook, and Twitter condemned the move (Twitter said it had "undermined America's greatest economic asset: its diversity"). "Visa reform makes sense," said Tesla CEO Elon Musk, "but this is too broad."  Experts tell Business Insider the change could help Europe catch up with Silicon Valley. James Wise, partner at Balderton Capital, a London-based VC that invests in European startups, said that UK firms may now be able to lure more veteran founders to Europe — and Tech Nation, a startup platform funded by both the UK government and private investors, said applications for a specialized UK tech visa have risen by 35% in a year. It's "too early to say" exactly how much, if any, of that jump is linked to the H-1B visa freeze, Tech Nation chief executive Gerard Grech said. But the experts we spoke to are clear: Where US CEOs see disaster in the freeze, other countries wanting to grow their tech hubs should see a massive opportunity. Read more... Amazon, Google, Apple, and other tech companies are speaking out against Trump's freeze on immigrant work visas American companies from all industries have increasingly used the H-1B visa, one of several that have been suspended, to recruit from overseas for specialist jobs, including from India and China. Previously, there was a 65,000-cap on H-1B visas a year, with 20,000 extra visas for foreign professionals who graduate with a master's degree or doctorate from an American university. In 2019, 188,100 new and initial H-1B visas were issued. Trump's administration argues that worker visas like this harm employment prospects for Americans, and that ending them could inspire a new generation of homegrown talent. Tech companies, startups, and VCs acknowledge that there is a shortage in tech skills in the domestic workforce.  "We need to start training our people better and until [we do] we will always have a shortage and be dependent on the political environment at the time," said Paul Melchiorre, operating partner at Stripes, a growth equity firm. He adds that boosting the American workforce's skills is a "matter of national security." But developing homegrown talent and recruiting skilled workers from overseas are not mutually exclusive. When the visas were suspended, Elon Musk said tech workers coming to the US were "net job creators." Priya Lakhani, founder and CEO of CENTURY Tech, a British startup that uses AI to track a student's progress, told Business Insider people shouldn't think about highly skilled tech staff as taking jobs away from citizens of any country. Innovation inevitably creates more jobs for locals, she said. One country's loss could be another country's gain US-based venture capitalists warn that it's not just larger companies that would be hurt by the rule change — if the suspension becomes permanent, it could damage startups, too. "Startups need the best talent to compete globally or they will fail," said Tae Hea Nahm, the cofounding managing director at Storm Ventures, a VC firm based in Silicon Valley. "This visa restriction severely limits the US startups' ability to hire the best talent and bring them to their home office, so it will encourage startups — and VCs who invest in them — to do more business out of the US."  Europe, and in particular the UK, could stand to benefit from the US visa situation, according to Balderton Capital's Wise. "If those US companies are no longer making the same kind of hires because of changes to their visa system, that means that talent could easily be attracted to UK companies," he said.  In the US, many founders have already been through several companies, giving the country's tech market a "significant advantage," Wise said — but the H-1B visa change could see more "Valley veterans" move to the UK, helping Europe catch up. "Those Valley veterans bring a whole wealth of experience which will enable our businesses to catch up with the advantage that Silicon Valley, as well as other tech hubs in the US and China, have. Hopefully British technology companies will seize the opportunity to hire those types of people," he said.  If workers can no longer enter the US, the UK may be an attractive alternative. Grech, of Tech Nation, said the UK has many draws: namely, it's English speaking, and its tech ecosystem is thriving. "London startups raised more money since the start of January than Paris, Stockholm, Berlin, and Tel Aviv combined — with $4 billion raised already this year," he said. Lakhani, of CENTURY Tech, said that the ARPA project, in which the UK government has committed to funding "high-risk, high-payoff research in emerging fields of research and technology," shows the importance placed on technology in the UK. She also believes that a post-Brexit points immigration system may help Britain hire talent. "The government is encouraging companies to hire UK talent, but where there is a need and when we need talent to ensure we're not stifling innovation, we're open to a certain number of people coming from different countries to help us with that and I think tech companies will welcome that," she said. Exactly how many foreign workers will choose the UK or Europe over the US following the H-1B visa freeze is not yet clear. But the experts agree that the rule change could prompt some foreign tech workers in the US to re-evaluate their position. Many talented tech employees enter the UK through the Tech Nation visa, designed for highly skilled workers. If they meet certain criteria, such as a proven record of innovation in techm, they can stay in the UK for between three and five years. Applications are at record levels: Tech Nation's Greech told Business Insider they have risen 35% over the past year. "While it's hard and possibly too early to say exactly what the impact of the US's decision to suspend the H1-b visa scheme, we're certainly seeing a continuation of strong application numbers from the US," he said.SEE ALSO: Trump signs a proclamation halting H-1B work visas and other temporary visas Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
  Product managers play a central role in enterprise tech, and typically take the lead in planning, troubleshooting and rolling out new products. Their job has evolved dramatically with the rapid growth of cloud computing, and the emergence of new technologies, such as AI and big data. Here's how much Oracle, Cisco, SAP, Workday, ServiceNow and VMware pay product managers, based on disclosure data for permanent and temporary workers filed with the US Office of Foreign Labor Certification in 2019. Click here for more BI Prime stories. Product managers play such an important role in tech that Silicon Valley investor Ben Horowitz once argued that "a good product manager is the CEO of the product."  The statement sparked some debate, although there's little disagreement about the importance of product managers in the technology industry. Product managers are deeply involved in pretty much every key step in rolling out a new product, from the planning to troubleshooting to figuring out how to get customers to buy it. The job has become even more critical in the enterprise tech market which is undergoing a dramatic transformation with the rise of the cloud, and the emergence of cutting edge technologies, including AI and big data analytics. "In today's era, the product manager job is more critical than ever," IDC President Crawford Del Prete told Business Insider. "The function of managing the product development, delivery and support is critical in today's market." He cited the rise of "as a service" products which allow businesses to access different tools, including applications, data storage and even platforms, based on a subscription or on usage. It's a system that typically features "a steady stream" of products and features, instead of "big version announcements" which requires product managers to be more nimble and to have a clearer sense of product roadmaps, he said. The product manager's job is expected to become even more challenging in a work from home economy, Eric Hunter, a senior director at Gartner, said. More businesses are looking to set up their networks in the cloud, even as they require more and new tools to manage a remote workforce. "Product managers have significantly adapted how they manage their strategic roadmaps and in how they relate with delivery teams as a result of the cloud," he told Business Insider. "COVID requires product managers to be even more effective leaders." That's why it's not at all surprising that product managers are among the top paying roles in tech. Business Insider analyzed the US Office of Foreign Labor Certification's 2020 disclosure data for permanent and temporary foreign workers to find out what five major enterprise-tech giants — Oracle, Cisco, VMware, SAP and Workday — pay product managers. Companies are required to disclose information such as salary ranges when they hire foreign workers under the H-1B visa program, giving insight into what these major companies are willing to shell out for talent. Note that for some positions, the companies involved only gave salary ranges, rather than specific figures. Here's how much these top enterprise-technology companies paid product managers hired in 2020:SEE ALSO: Tech sales and marketing salaries revealed: How much enterprise giants IBM, Oracle, Dell, Cisco, and VMware pay sales reps, managers, and consultants SEE ALSO: Here's the pitchdeck template that $1.3 billion cloud HR startup Rippling used to raise $145 million from investors led by Founders Fund SEE ALSO: Experts predict 15 gigantic tech mergers we could see in a recession, from Amazon buying Oracle to IBM buying Dell Cisco hired a product manager in North Carolina with a salary in the range of $116,000 to $138,000. Cisco, the dominant vendor for networking equipment, is one of the traditional enterprise tech vendors that is adapting to the cloud. The company got a boost from the coronavirus crisis and the sudden pivot to remote work given the need for secure, reliable networking systems. But Cisco recently warned that it is bracing itself for more uncertainty in the enterprise market, especially small and medium-sized businesses. The company said it plans to cut more than $1 billion in costs. Cisco has continued to hire, and recently brought in more than two dozen product managers. Here are some of Cisco's recent product manager hires based on 695 approved visa applications and how much they're paid: Product manager (California): $170,000 to $234,000 Product manager (Washington): $192,000 to $212,000 Product manager (Texas): $165,000 to $193,000 Product manager (Georgia): $112,000 to $150,000 Product manager (North Carolina): $116,00 to $138,000   Oracle hired a product manager in Florida with a salary in the range of $79,000 to $212,000. Oracle is making an aggressive bid to become a stronger player in the cloud, where it lags rivals led by Amazon Web Services, Microsoft and Google. The Silicon Valley recently filled at least three product manager positions in Florida, Washington and Texas.  Here are some of Oracle's recent product manager hires from 452 approved visa applications, and how much they're paid: Product manager, strategy and development (Florida): $79,000 to $212,000 Product manager, strategy and development (Washington): $153,000 to $189,000 Product manager, strategy and development (Texas): $124,000 to $179,000   SAP hired a product manager in California with a salary range of $177,000 to $300,000. SAP is one of the top enterprise software vendors in the world. Like other traditional enterprise software companies, the German tech giant has been pushing to strengthen its position in the cloud market. The company filled at least two key product manager roles, according to the data. Here are SAP's recent product manager hires based on 393 approved visa applications and how much they're paid: Product manager (California): $177,000 to $300,000 Product manager (California): $138,000   Workday hired a principal product manager with a salary in the $154,000 to $232,000 range. Workday's platform enables businesses to manage their finances and human resources.  The Pleasanton, California-based company is considered one of the pioneers of cloud computing, It made at least two product manager hires, both in California. Workday is a major cloud player whose platform enables businesses to manage company finances and human resources.  Here are some of Workday's recent hires based on 117 approved visa applications and how much they're paid: Principal product manager (California): $154,000 to $232,000 Technical product manager/API platform (California): $116,000 to $174,000   ServiceNow hired a senior principal product manager in Washington with a salary of $189,000. ServiceNow is another cloud computing pioneer whose platform enables businesses to automate and manage their workflow. The company recently filled at least eight product manager jobs in California, Illinois and Washington. Here are some of ServiceNow's recent hires based on 225 approved visa applications and how much they're paid: Technical product manager (California): $147,000 to $170,000 Senior product manager, platform (Illinois): $92,000 to $140,000 Principal product manager (California): $138,000 Principal product manager, outbound legal (California): $160,000 Senior principal product manager (Washington): $189,000   VMware hired a senior technical product manager in California with a salary of $214,000. VMware blazed the trail in virtualization, or software that lets businesses tap disparate computer systems as one network, which has been an important technology in cloud computing. The tech giant has filled more than dozen product manager roles recently, mostly in California. Here some of VMware's recent product manager hires from 717 approved visa applications and how much they're paid: Senior technical product manager (California): $214,000 Senior technical product manager (California): $189,000 Senior product manager (California): $195,000 Senior product manager (New York): $155,000 Senior product manager (California): $153,000 Senior product manager (Georgia): $122,000 Product manager (California): $120,000 Product manager (Georgia): $113,000 Product manager (Georgia): $105,000
So surprising, what with the pandemic and Uncle Sam being so welcoming for immigrants right now Too few H-1B hopefuls applied for employment visas this year that the US government has held an unprecedented second lottery to reach its annual quota.…
Trump's proclamation suspended a group of non-immigrant visa programs, including H-1B visas relied on by many technology firms to bring in engineers.
Also touts scheme to have USA to pocket finder’s fee for allowing TikTok sale US president Donald Trump spent much of his Monday on matters impacting the technology industry.…
Many people in the tech industry are choosing to move to Canada over the US because of the US' restrictive immigration laws. Since 2013, Toronto has added more tech jobs than any other place in North America, including Silicon Valley. 25% of Canada's overall workforce are immigrants, and in the tech space that number is even higher — 40%. View more episodes of Business Insider Today on Facebook. Silicon Valley's reputation as the world's leading tech hub could be in jeopardy because of the United States' restrictive immigration laws. Tens of thousands of immigrant tech workers have flocked to Toronto in the past few years, making it the fastest growing tech hub in North America. Many of them are deliberately avoiding the US as the Trump administration clamps down on immigration. In June, President Donald Trump temporarily suspended visas known as H-1B visas, which are awarded to thousands of skilled immigrant workers each year. The visa suspension is prompting some immigrants, like former Silicon Valley product manager Asim Fayaz, to move north to Canada.  "There is a whole world out there, and you are probably better off going somewhere else because you'd be treated more human," said Fayaz, a Pakistani immigrant who now runs an online restaurant business in Toronto. "You don't need to be, like, pleading for your existence all the time." Every year, the US government reserves 85,000 H-1B visas for skilled foreign professionals — people like Elon Musk, who was born in South Africa and started companies such as Tesla and SpaceX in the US. Fayaz came to the US to attend the University of California, and landed a job after graduating with a master's degree in 2016. As an immigrant, trying to find work in the US was tough — he needed an American employer to not just hire him, but also sponsor his H-1B work visa. This year, immigration laws suddenly changed as Trump suspended the program, citing "an unusual threat to the employment of American workers" during the coronavirus pandemic. The move left thousands in limbo. But while the US is closing doors, Canada has been rolling out the welcome mat. Since 2013, the number of tech jobs in Toronto has skyrocketed from about 148,000 to 228,000, an increase of 54%. "We have over 100,000 people immigrate to the Toronto region each year, which is twice as many as San Francisco Bay Area," Jason Goldlist, cofounder of TechToronto, said. And we don't just attract the quantity. It's also quality because a fifth of these immigrants already have a STEM degree before they even arrive here. Canadian e-commerce giant Shopify is trying to capitalize on the opportunity. Following Trump's announcement, CEO Tobias Lutke — himself an immigrant from Germany — tweeted, "If this affects your plans consider coming to Canada instead." Sandeep Anand, the company's senior mobility lead, echoed Lutke's call for talent: "Whether they're already in Canada, whether they're globally present, we're looking to really expand our diverse workforce. And in some cases it does mean that we would need to relocate and provide immigration support, which we're happy to do," she told Business Insider Today. According to a 2016 study, 25% of Canada's workforce are immigrants. And in the tech space, that number is even higher — 40%, or 350,000 workers. And there's still room for more, says Ilya Brotzky, the founder & CEO of VanHack, a Canadian firm that helps place global talent in tech jobs across North America. Brotzky cited Canada's 3% unemployment rate in the tech sector, well below its overall unemployment rate.  "It's not like there's a bunch of Canadians waiting to take these jobs," Brotzky said. "The unemployment rate is really, really low. We can't find the people." Brotzky argues it makes economic sense for US companies to open offices in Canada, as well. "You have these people that can basically work in the same time zone, quick flight from you, really easy laws, super fast to set up, and you have the benefit of Canadian dollar salaries," he told Business Insider Today. "But more importantly, you have access to the global talent pool. So you can bring in any developer from around the world that's good." That's why Canada is trying to attract highly skilled foreign professionals through visa programs like the Global Talent Stream, launched in 2017. Immigration experts say it is like the H-1B program, but a lot better.  "It's a very fast processing time. It takes anywhere from roughly around two weeks to complete the first stage. And then the second stage, which is the work permit stage. It takes another two weeks. So you could be in Canada as quickly as a month," Blayne Kumar, founder of the immigration services company Bright Immigration, said. For Fayaz, the decision to move from the US to Canada came after he was laid off from his Silicon Valley company, when he and his wife became fed up with constantly worrying about their legal status. "It's not even like in 10 years, I will get it," he said. "It's like maybe, maybe not. Who knows, who cares. We don't need you in this country." And the recent suspension of the H-1B visa program only confirmed his worst fears. "You know that scene in movies where the actor is leaving the scene and the world is blowing up behind you, right? I feel like that — that I kind of managed to exit the scene somehow, magically," he said. "And I look back and the US is just blowing up." "So many of my friends, people that I worked with, went to school with, they're all impacted. And whenever I get a phone call, I just feel so sorry for all those people."SEE ALSO: Canada is way ahead in sRemote work could accelerate the tech industry's migration to Canada, where affordable costs of living and more open immigration policies are helping create tech hubs to rival Silicon Valleycooping up tech talent from the US DON'T MISS: Scientists and entrepreneurs are pioneering plastic alternatives with the goal of creating materials that can be recycled over and over Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
While the US has long been a tech sector destination, the country's recent political climate has pushed noncitizen tech workers to reconsider their options — and Canada could be benefiting, Axios reported. Axios cited a study from the Center for Security and Emerging Technology which found that even before the pandemic, Canada's skilled immigration program has been successfully processing a high number of noncitizen American residents. From 2017 to 2019, more than 20,000 applied for and received express entry permanent residence in Canada, and the number increased by 75% over that period, the study found.  From the Trump administration freezing H-1B visas to nearly barring international students at colleges operating remotely, the US is at risk of intensifying this flow of residents, and pushing its top tech talent out. Following the H-1B visa ban, the CEO of Ottawa-based Shopify tweeted: "If this affects your plans, consider coming to Canada," suggesting that company at least is welcoming American talent.  In 2019, the US was the third most popular recipient of express entry for skilled noncitizen workers, behind India ... and Canada. Canadian immigration numbers are likely to increase and US immigration numbers are likely to fall. A study from the National Foundation of American Policy projected that enrollment of new international students at US colleges — the exact kind of person Canada would welcome — is set to decline this fall by 63% to 98%.  Business Insider has provided a step-by-step guide on moving to Canada and becoming a citizen. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. SEE ALSO: A step-by-step guide for moving to Canada and becoming a citizen there Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
Pipeline looks good as C-level crystal balls predict need for more tech Indian services company Infosys has said that lower-than-planned costs for visas have helped it to record better-than-expected results for the first quarter of its financial year.…
Funnily enough, triggering a brain drain and denting the economy isn't such a great vote winner The Trump administration today scrapped its new rule that would have forced up to a million foreign students to leave the United States if their universities didn’t offer at least some in-person tuition mid-pandemic.…
President Trump's decision to suspend key immigrant work visas has been severely criticized by many in the US tech industry, which has long relied on foreign talent. Venture capitalists, founders, and CEOs who are immigrants themselves shared their frustrations with the Trump order with Business Insider. One of them, Togo-born F5 Networks CEO Francois Lo coh Donou, who grew up in France, told Business Insider that the executive order "sends the signal to highly-skilled immigrants around the world that the US is a dangerous and unstable place to bet on for their careers." Read the words and stories of 15 other tech leaders who denounce the visa freeze. Click here for more BI Prime stories. President Trump's order suspending many types of immigrant work visas in late June prompted a strong response from the US tech industry which has long relied on talent from overseas. Executives from major tech giants, including Amazon, Apple, Google, Box, and Twitter were quick to criticize the move, calling it "unbelievably bad policy" that "undermines America's greatest economic asset." More recently, the Trump administration also said international students at US institutions that have shifted to remote learning must leave the country.  Business Insider reached out to leading figures in the tech industry who moved to the US as immigrants, on work or student visas or green cards, for their insights into the Trump administration's move to severely curtail the arrival of workers and students from other countries. These 16 technology figures have played critical roles in the industry as venture capital investors, top engineers, CEOs, and trailblazing entrepreneurs and founders. Here's what they said:SEE ALSO: The tech industry has a terrible track record on diversity. Here's how 17 companies that spoke out against racism this week say they plan to improve. F5 Networks CEO Francois Locoh Donou: It sends the message to immigrants that the 'US is a dangerous and unstable place to bet on for their careers.' Francois Locoh Donou, CEO of networking giant F5 Networks, is a native of Togo and grew up up in France. He came to the US on an H1-B visa when he joined Ciena, another networking company, in the early 2000s. "Without that visa and the stability it provided, I doubt I would hold the position I do at F5 today," he told Business Insider. "Like a number of tech companies, I share the belief that our company's future, and the growth of the tech industry at large, rely upon recruiting and retaining talent from all backgrounds and countries." The Trump order suspending the work visas sends a potentially harmful message, he said. "This executive order – even if temporary– sends the signal to highly-skilled immigrants around the world that the US is a dangerous and unstable place to bet on for their careers," he said. "That is not what this country is about, and it is certainly no way to ensure the US economy's global competitiveness."     Landing AI founder and CEO Andrew Ng: 'There's an obligation for us to make smart decisions from a business and strategic perspective, but also to treat people with kindness.' Throughout his career, computer scientist Andrew Ng has founded organizations like Google Brain, Coursera, and Landing AI.  Many of their founding teams consisted of students on the F-1 visa or workers on the H-1B visa. Ng, who was born in the UK and raised in Hong Kong, was a recipient of these visas, too. He knew he wanted to study artificial intelligence and first came to the US to attend college at Carnegie Mellon University in 1993, staying for graduate school and becoming a professor at Stanford University and obtaining an H-1B visa. Many of Silicon Valley's tech companies were founded by immigrants, yet the current lengthy American immigration process is riddled with uncertainty, Ng says. "For a green card, the wait time is many, many decades long," Ng said. "Who knows if five years from now, maybe a change in policy will make all that waiting pointless? It's damaging the US to create uncertainty in the immigration process because it makes it difficult for an individual to want to make a long term investment." Even for Ng, he says that while he had a visa that allowed him to work in the US, it was always something in the back of his mind to worry about for others, whether his interns at Google Brain or his international Coursera cofounders.  "Immigration is an important business and strategic issue for the US, but it's also a very human issue for millions of families," Ng said. "There's an obligation for us to make smart decisions from a business and strategic perspective, but also to treat people with kindness." Technovation founder and CEO Tara Chklovski: 'It's very, very important to keep the systems and channels open.' Technovation founder and CEO Tara Chklovski grew up in India with the dream of becoming an aerospace engineer. She studied physics as an undergradute, but not many universities in India at the time offered aerospace engineering, so she decided to do her graduate studies in the US. She came to the US on an F-1 student visa with a full scholarship for her masters at Boston University.  "It was absolutely awesome," Chklovski said. "For me, it was freedom on so many different levels. India is a developing country. Women are very few in aerospace. Also there is lots of gender-based inequality and gender-based violence and different ways of oppression of girls." While Chklovski studied aerospace engineering in the US, she realized that there were very few women in her industry, which inspired her to start an education nonprofit called Technovation to encourage more girls worldwide to enter STEM fields and connect them with mentorship, guidance, and internships. "When I was in a PhD program, it was very very stark to see that there are not that many women," Chklovski said. "I did internships, and I felt like I was the only woman in the technical department. It was wrong and odd. We're not bringing in ideas from 50% of the population." Chklovski says she was grateful she was able to get a student visa and believes innovation comes from a diversity of ideas. "If you bring in people from different countries, it will help build society," Chklovski said. "I think it's very very important to keep the systems and channels open, not just into the US but for other countries as well." Lightspeed Venture Partners' Arif Janmohamed: 'It's against the ethos of this country.' Arif Janmohamed, partner at Lightspeed Venture Partners, only became a US citizen in late June 2020, but his journey to citizenship began in the 1990s when he got his first taste of Silicon Valley. Janmohamed was born in Canada and grew up in Montreal. After he graduated, he moved to the Bay Area and never looked back. He first came with a TN visa, which offers work authorization to people from Canada and Mexico. He eventually got an H-1B visa, then a green card, and most recently, US citizenship.  The H-1B visa suspension is personal for Janmohamed, which he says contradicts the values of the American dream: "It's against the ethos of this country." "Those people who would otherwise put down roots over here, buy houses here, work at great companies, and learn from peer mentors here, will go somewhere else around the world," Janmohamed told Business Insider. "Ultimately what we're doing is hurting US innovation." Janmohamed's own family has immigrated multiple times over the generations. His ancestors come from India, but they immigrated to Kenya because they faced economic uncertainty and persecution.  His parents grew up in Kenya, but in 1972, Idi Amin, the president of Uganda at the time, expelled Asians – many of whom were Indian – from the country. Although his family wasn't directly affected, they moved to Canada as uncertainty spread to nearby countries as well, including Tanzania and Kenya.  Janmohamed's father was an entrepreneur, and eventually, Janmohamed would follow in his father's footsteps by working at various tech startups. In college, he decided that he wanted to experience Silicon Valley for himself. He sent 250 emails, and eventually, got an internship from a Bay Area startup called Nomadic Technology, which operated out of a garage.  After graduation, Janmohamed worked at various startups before going to business school and deciding he wanted to help build up those companies in the second half of his career. He joined Lightspeed in 2008, where he has been for the last 12 years, working with companies like Netskope, Qubole, TripActions, and ThoughtSpot. "Seeing these companies go from an idea to employing tens or hundreds of people of creating value, that was exciting to me," Janmohamed said.  Nutanix CEO Dheeraj Pandey: 'Immigration is at the heart of capitalism' A native of India, Nutanix cofounder and CEO Dheeraj Pandey moved to the US as a student at the University of Texas-Austin in 1997.  He cites "the openness of the US immigration program" as a key to his successful tech career. "America hugged me hard," he said in a tweet the day after Trump signed the freeze order. "I became an Indian American." Pandey, whose company is now a $4.6 billion infrastructure software powerhouse, added that he believes that immigration is "at the heart of capitalism."  Tweet Embed: //twitter.com/mims/statuses/1275656883584602117?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw Immigration is at the heart of capitalism, I think. But it also creates extremely grateful citizens like me who are here to give back in every which way possible. I am in awe of this country for how it supported me when I needed a springboard the most. #eternallygrateful (2/2)   Race Capital cofounder Alfred Chuang: One visa made a big difference Alfred Chuang, a native of Hong Kong, came to the US on an H-1B visa when he joined Sun Microsystems in the mid-1980s. Getting that visa was "a life changing experience," he told Business Insider.   "If I didn't get my H-1B then I would not have gone on to cofound BEA Systems, which subsequently employed over 30,000 US workers when it was an independent company," he said. BEA Systems, which Oracle acquired for $8.5 billion in 2008, was also a major win for Warburg Pincus which had made a $50 million investment in the company, he said. This year, Chuang launched his own venture capital fund, Race Capital, which plans to support startups that are developing technologies for the post-COVID world. "This little step of Alfred getting his H-1B has manifested a whole different outcome for the world of enterprise tech," Chuang said. "That's the potential each visa holds."  Intel chief engineer Murthy Renduchintala: 'Foreign national graduates of US advanced degree programs are essential to closing this skills gap.' Venkata Murthy Renduchintala, known in Silicon Valley as Murthy, came to the US from Great Britain on a temporary work visa when he joined Phillips in 1997. He later joined Qualcomm where he served as a top executive for 11 years before being recruited by chip giant Intel where he is now chief engineer. Work visas play a critical role in the American tech industry because "there is a shortage of highly trained and specialized engineers and scientists in the US," Murthy, now a US citizen, told Business Insider.  "To maintain leadership in the global semiconductor industry, we believe it is critical to continue attracting the best and brightest STEM talent from all over the world, he said. "Foreign national graduates of US advanced degree programs are essential to closing this skills gap."   Zoom CEO Eric Yuan: Silicon Valley is the 'center of innovation' because it welcomes founders and employees from around the world Zoom CEO Eric Yuan's visa application was rejected eight times over the course of 2 years before it was finally approved in 1997. He moved from China to Silicon Valley on a temporary, six-month B-1 visa and started working at WebEx and later got an H-1B visa.  Silicon Valley "is the center of innovation because it welcomes founders and employees from countries worldwide," Yuan told Business Insider in an email. He was inspired to work for a tech company after watching a speech Bill Gates gave about the dot-com bubble, according to Bloomberg. Yuan helped build WebEx as its VP of engineering, and stayed on when Cisco acquired it in 2007. That was also the year Yuan became a US citizen. After four years at Cisco, he left in June 2011 to start Zoom. Zoom went public last year and is widely thought to have transformed the video conferencing market and the way people work. It's grown tremendously this year due to social distancing mandates during the pandemic, with a market cap of over $70 billion.  "Zoom simply would not exist if it weren't for the tireless efforts of our employees including immigrants," Yuan said. "Immigrants make us stronger as a company and as a nation, and we should advocate for policies that welcome and empower them." Array Ventures founder Shruti Gandhi: The US is "stagnating" itself by closing off immigration Shruti Gandhi moved to the US from India in 1999 on a green card, after her aunt had applied for her and her parents about 14 years prior. It's the process that's often referred to as "chain migration," where US citizens can apply for a green card for their close family members, but the process often takes years. Gandhi finished high school and college in upstate New York where she realized her interest in technology. She then started working at IBM and worked there for a decade before making a career shift into venture capital. She launched her own firm called Array Ventures in 2015. In her experience, immigrants contribute significantly to both the tech industry and the overall economy, and if the US closes itself off to immigrant workers it will stagnate the economy, she said. Many of the companies Array invests in are created by immigrant founders, who in turn create jobs for others.  "I think it wouldn't have been possible if someone like me wasn't given the chance and the opportunity to truly live the American dream," she said, adding that the exchange of ideas created by immigrants is invaluable. She also said the US only hurting itself in the long run because as remote work becomes the norm, companies will opt to hire people where they're already at instead of asking them to immigrate if US immigration policies continue to be restrictive.  "If we don't capture that dollar here for tuition and things like that then we're losing that income and we're not doing a better job of training our own workforce," Gandhi said. "We're basically stagnating ourselves here." Outreach CEO Manny Medina: These policies are creating a 'climate of fear and uncertainty' for immigrants Manny Medina came to the US from Ecuador on a student visa in 1994, and decided to study computer engineering. He stayed because he loved programming and engineering and felt like the US was the best place to pursue it.  His first job after college was at Bell Atlantic, which is now part of Verizon, and he worked to build the company's billing systems. He was able to work on an OPT visa, which gives international students one to three years to work in the US before needing an H-1B or other work visa. The company applied for his H-1B visa but because a limited number of visas are awarded each year, he didn't get one. Medina then attended grad school on a student visa and was able to keep working for the company because it funded a research project that he could work on at school. During that time, he got married and subsequently got a green card and later became a citizen.  He's since worked as an engineer for various tech companies including Amazon and Microsoft, before founding his current company Outreach in 2014.  As an immigrant who built a career and company in the US, he said these current policies are creating a "climate of fear and uncertainty for the immigrants who are here in the country" and that the "environment just creates animosity towards immigrants." At Outreach, 10 to 15% of the workforce is immigrants, and these policies make it hard for the company to continue attracting talent. Medina said Outreach is starting to think about building new teams overseas in places like Prague where it has an office. Those are jobs that could be here if the climate was more favorable, he said. Carbon Health CEO Eren Bali: Diverse perspectives create diverse companies. Eren Bali moved to the US in 2007 on an H-1B visa after cofounding education-tech startup Udemy in Turkey earlier that year. "My naive kind of goal was to come here for a couple of months, raise money from investors here," Bali told Business Insider. "And then obviously I just didn't go anywhere." He worked at a handful of other Silicon Valley companies after leaving Udemy, before starting Carbon Health, a platform that fuses virtual and in-person health care, in 2015. He said his experience as an immigrant in the US allowed him to look at healthcare providers and technology through a different lens. Other companies in Silicon Valley at the time were focused on products for consumers who already had high-quality health care, like premium wearables and body scanners. But Bali realized that the real issue was much more basic: "The primary problem in the US healthcare is access." The new visa freezes would hamper that kind of diversity of thought and perspectives.  "Silicon Valley is all about talent," Bali said. "You move the people here to another place, that place is the new Silicon Valley." Since the coronavirus pandemic started, Carbon Health started offering free COVID-19 tests in the Bay Area and grew its 100-person workforce to 300 by May. "Trump's administration failed to contain this problem," Bali said. "Companies like ours rise up to the challenge and will help solve the problem." NetApp CEO George Kurian: 'Building barriers' just 'weakens American leadership' "Immigrants have had an incredible impact on the tech industry," George Kurian, the CEO of NetApp, told Business Insider. He and his brother, Thomas Kurian, the CEO of Google Cloud, are prominent examples. The Kurian brothers, who are from India, are the most famous twin siblings in the tech industry. They moved to the US as students in the late 1980s, each earning a engineering degree from Princeton and an MBA from Stanford Graduate School of Business. The NetApp CEO said that the move to limit work visas drastically could potentially weaken the US tech industry: "Building barriers between countries and labor markets impedes our ability to reach our greatest potential in a changing world, and over time weakens American leadership," he said.  His company serves customers in about 140 countries worldwide, he added. "And we have benefited from having people from so many different parts of the world be part of our company." In an interview with Business Insider last year, Kurian previously opened up about how moving to the US is a challenging experience for most immigrants: "They're giving up a lot to come here," he said. "They're giving up the comfort of the language and the culture they grew up in to come here. They're not making that decision lightly."   Pulse CEO Mayank Mehta: The 'immature' decision has led to immigrants feeling worried about their future in this country. Mayank Mehta, cofounder and CEO of the social research platform Pulse, was a recipient of both a student visa — when he came to the US to finish up high school — and an H-1B — when he moved to California for his first startup, Cooliris.  "Coming here was an absolute dream-come-true for me," Mehta told Business Insider. "I was a techie through and through." Mehta acknowledges that his visa process was easier than most: He was backed by venture capitalist firms like Kleiner Perkins who hired lawyers to make the process as smooth as possible for him. By the time Mehta became a citizen five years ago, Cooliris was acquired by Yahoo, and Mehta had moved on to becoming an angel investor and working at the enterprise platform Capriza.   "A large part of the team that we built up was from the immigrant community," he said. "Without all the diversity, we wouldn't have been able to get to where we were." Mehta, now the CEO of Pulse, called the Trump administration's decision "immature" and said the move is affecting his colleagues' stability and stress levels in the company and in the country.  "I have a number of people who are worried — both at Pulse as well as family and friends — that are concerned about what it means to have a future in this country," Mehta said. "Is this step one of many to come that is going to be more and more extreme in treating immigrants here?" Superhuman CEO Rahul Vohra: It's 'completely unfathomable' to turn away the next generation of founders Rahul Vohra came to the US on an H-1B visa when he was building his first company, Rapportive, in 2010. He and his other two cofounders were from the UK and wanted to come to the US because it's "still the best place to start a technology company" and have access to venture capital, he said.  After Rapportive was acquired by LinkedIn in 2012, Vohra stayed on for two years before leaving to found Superhuman, an email software startup that has a cult-like following in Silicon Valley. Vohra also applied for his green card and, after 6 years, he just became a citizen in February 2020. The jobs created at Rapportive, LinkedIn, and Superhuman — and the value those products provide — would have never been possible if he hadn't been able to get an H-1B visa, Vohra said, and there are many more like him. That's why he thinks it's "completely unfathomable" that the US is "turning away the next generation of founders and entrepreneurs that could be building the next Teslas, the next Googles, the next Facebooks." The work visa freeze is worrisome because no one knows what's coming next, he said, and many fear that the restrictions will continue even after the pandemic is over. "If the ban persists or it doesn't get repealed properly, then it's only going to make America less competitive and less diverse at a time when it needs to be both of those things," Vohra said.  Harness CEO and cofounder Jyoti Bansal: There's no 'rational argument' behind these bans because they're 'politically driven, xenophobia-driven.' Two-time tech entrepreneur Jyoti Bansal came from India to the US on an H-1B visa right when the dot-com crash was happening in 2000. Bansal worked at a startup called netLens and hoped to later start his own, but he had to wait until he got his green card to do so. Finally, in 2008, he made his dream come true when he founded AppDynamics, an application to help customers with monitoring and troubleshooting. In 2017, Cisco acquired AppDynamics for $3.7 billion. After he sold AppDynamics, Bansal set off to start his next company, Harness, which helps developers with automatically releasing code faster and more often. He also cofounded a venture capital firm called Unusual Ventures.  Bansal says many people were surprised he started another company after selling AppDynamics and asked him why he didn't just go retire on a beach somewhere.  "I'm passionate about solving problems and building companies around it," Bansal said. "That's my motivation." Bansal says that he had always believe that Silicon Valley was the place to go if he wanted to work at a startup, but that sheen could fade because of these bans.  "Good engineers and scientists and talent are coming to the US to work on interesting things, especially since Silicon Valley has that perception," Bansal said. "There's a lot of this short-term political thinking and I don't think there's any rational argument behind these bans. Seems like it's politically driven, xenophobia-driven arguments mostly. In the long term, it's a loss." EmpInfo CEO Jag Puttanna: Like the coronavirus crisis, Trump's order creates uncertainty Jag Puttanna, the cofounder and CEO of the employment verification company EmpInfo, disagreed with the Trump administration's rationale that suspending work visas for H-1B recipients would make sure that Americans get those jobs. "[Visa recipients] are not taking anyone's jobs away." he said, "It doesn't mean that those jobs will go to someone who's not talented here — that would go to an individual who was qualified to do it no matter where they are in this country and the world." Puttanna came to the US from India on a student visa for his graduate program at the University of Nevada. He moved to the Bay Area after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, when structural engineers were in high demand.  "The company desperately needed someone with my background," Puttanna told Business Insider. "It was good for an employer to hire someone who had the talent." Now, as someone who employs guest workers with H-1B visas, he says the restriction put his colleagues in limbo. One planned on going to another country for a wedding, another wanted to visit family abroad, but because of new H-1B restrictions, Puttanna says, his employees are reluctant to travel. All this, amid the uncertainty of the coronavirus pandemic. "That's another COVID-19 kind of situation, that you can't travel," Puttanna said. "All these H-1B restrictions would curtail them in to live freely. They came here for the freedom, not to lose the freedom."
On June 22nd, citing COVID-19’s economic disruption and rising unemployment, US President Donald Trump signed an executive order to freeze the distribution of temporary worker visas (including the H-1B visa) till the end of 2020.The H-1B is the largest guest worker programme in the US, availed by workers in “specialty occupations”.Indians are the largest beneficiary of the visa programme, having claimed over 70% of the work visas in recent years.And if you look at the list of top companies that avail the visa, you'll see a string of IT and tech giants.Which should not come as a big surprise because computer-related companies command a lion's share of H-1B visas.What will be the repercussions of Trump's suspension of the H-1B?
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