It s a good question for the 21st century: If you were in a car that was driving itself, what would you be doing?Lazing about and blabbering to friends.Lest you lose faith in humanity at the idea of 89 percent of people wishing to squander the gift of free time on socializing when they could be bettering themselves, the earth, or humanity, take consolation in the fact that about half of respondents want to do something productive such as reading, sending texts or emails, or searching the web, Intelligentsia s paywalled report said.For the sake of our outlook on Homo sapiens americanus we ll assume that those respondents were not envisioning themselves texting, emailing and searching the web about the Kardashians or Grumpy Cat 2.0.However, the survey results may suggest to Google and other makers of self-driving cars an important feature: dimmable windows.The survey s question about what people would do in the cars, that Intelligentsia hadn t asked them about, drew several responses from people who said they d be having sex.It was a surprise to see it mentioned so many times across demographic groups, the report said.Speaking of Google, the survey suggested the firm lacks a degree of public trust in its self-driving technology, even though Google is leading the way on the technology.When respondents were asked which companies they d trust to provide safe robot cars, Tesla came first, followed by Toyota and Apple, with Google coming in at No.7, just ahead of Volvo.Photo: A Google self-driving car in Mountain View Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group Tags: Google, Intelligentsia, self-driving cars, sex, socializing
The general concept for the book is to ask about our ongoing evolution, from the perspective of a scientist who takes what we know about our past, what we know about today, and thinking about the long-term possibilities for our species, Solomon, a biologist at Rice University in Houston, said.Martian speciationSolomon explained that new species evolve most commonly when a barrier prevents a population from mating, such as on an island archipelago, so species on separate Galapagos islands evolve along separate lines.With modern humanity, of course, the trend is going in the opposite direction, as people move around the planet at a rate unprecedented in human history.These populations were then isolated from the rest of world for about 10,000 years.That would suggest that, on a planet with a similar atmosphere and gravity as the Earth, it would take a human population more than 10,000 years to speciate.Another factor to consider as humans contemplate colonizing other worlds, Solomon said, is the founder effect, which simply means that when a small number of people establish a new population from a larger population, the genes of the founders will have a huge influence on that population moving forward.
One stops -- not on a dime, it turns out, but rather over a QR code stuck to the floor -- and allows the other to proceed, carrying inventory to a human worker who will pluck out an item, scan it and send it off for packing and shipping.In this building the size of 28 football fields, containing four miles of conveyor belts and 15 million items awaiting customer orders from Northern California and beyond, the two limbless goods-moving machines are part of Amazon's 30,000-strong robot army.Gliding in straight lines on a grid, separated from workers by chain-link fencing with signs warning people to keep out, the machines can lift and carry up to 750 pounds of retail products.It has leased a fleet of 20 jumbo jets to further speed deliveries as an estimated 54 million Americans have flocked to its two-day-delivery Prime service.The company says its superhuman robots have created far more jobs than they've taken, but experts say that employment trend will reverse as machines grow increasingly sophisticated and climb ever higher on the job-skills ladder, bumping Homo sapiens to the side.The company in May won a patent for robot-aided stowing that says, "some or all of the activities described as being performed by a human operator may be performed by automated mechanisms."Amazon ORder-fulfillment CENTERSU.S. fulfillment centers: 50Roboticized fulfillment centers in U.S.: 15Roboticized fulfillment centers in California: 3Human workers: 90,000Robots: 30,000Fulfillment centers, global: 123Amazon associate Michael Keele, of Tracy, scans items before stowing them in a portable storage unit to be carried away by an Amazon Robotics robot at the Amazon fulfillment center in Tracy, Calif., on Tuesday, April 12, 2016.
photographer: All Over Press The one-meter midget people of Indonesia, was once great. New findings suggest that the strains from a large plant, extinct human species. The Indonesian island of Flores became world famous in October 2004, when scientists found the fossils of dwarf man with a brain the size of chimpanzee. The new findings "strongly suggest" that these "hobbits" has evolved from the large adult species Homo erectus that has a much larger brain, according to paleontologist Yousuke Kaifu. The phenomenon is known among animals: lack of food and space, such as an island, could lead to a drastic reduction of body size. A previous theory that hobbits were modern Homo sapiens has shrunk as a result of disease or genetic disorders can now be written off, say the researchers, who publish their findings in the journal Nature
A reconstruction of the "mini man" Homo floresiensis, that lived in Indonesia. The Indonesian island of Flores became world famous in October 2004, when scientists found the fossils of dwarf man with a brain the size of chimpanzee. The new findings "strongly suggest" that the hobbits have evolved from large adult species Homo erectus that has a much larger brain, according to paleontologist Yousuke Kaifu. Homo erectus shrank, generation by generation, nearly half his original weight and height. The phenomenon is known among animals: lack of food and space, such as an island, could lead to a drastic reduction of body size. An earlier theory - that the hobbits were modern Homo sapiens has shrunk as a result of disease or genetic disorders - can now be written off, say the researchers, who publish their findings in the journal Nature.
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