In 2010, archaeologists found evidence of a previously unknown hominin, the Denisovans, in a Siberian cave.This Denisovan mandible was discovered nearly 40 years ago by a monk who was wandering through Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe, China.We suspected this day would come, and it’s finally happened—the first fossil evidence of this species outside of Denisova cave, which is located in the Siberian Altai Mountains.Today, bits of Denisovan DNA linger on in present day Asian, Australian, and Melanesian populations.Indeed, a remarkable and puzzling aspect of Denisovan DNA is the presence of an allele known as EPAS1.This genetic mutation confers resistance to hypoxia, otherwise known as altitude sickness.
In 2010, archaeologists found evidence of a previously unknown hominin, the Denisovans, in a Siberian cave.This Denisovan mandible was discovered nearly 40 years ago by a monk who was wandering through Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe, China.We suspected this day would come, and it’s finally happened—the first fossil evidence of this species outside of Denisova cave, which is located in the Siberian Altai Mountains.Today, bits of Denisovan DNA linger on in present day Asian, Australian, and Melanesian populations.Indeed, a remarkable and puzzling aspect of Denisovan DNA is the presence of an allele known as EPAS1.This genetic mutation confers resistance to hypoxia, otherwise known as altitude sickness.
Scientists have discovered a 160,000-year-old jawbone from an ancient human ancestor in a cave in Tibet.Denisovans were an enigmatic offshoot of Neanderthals whose fossilized remains had previously been found only in Siberia.The new finding shows that these human ancestors adapted to a high-altitude, low-oxygen environment about 120,000 years before modern humans in the region did.Modern-day Tibetans may have inherited some of those genetic adaptations.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.He stumbled upon a broken jawbone with two large teeth.
that were around at 66 million years ago are around at 65 million years ago.No Tyrannosaurus rex living today; no Triceratops prorsus, no Edmontosaurus annectens.In our world herbivorous mammals begin to adapt to these conditions, evolving grinding grazing teeth and broad snouts to deal with the drier, grittier fodder.Rodents and rabbits, anteaters and armadillos, bats and weasels, moles and shrews, possums and koalas, could all probably arise.And as in our time line, these Alternate humans might have started as lower on the food chain, but evolution of greater intelligence, tool use, coordination, and so forth, means that they can survive and thrive in this world.They would all have vanished millions upon millions of years ago.”
A funny thing is happening in the land o' Googley matters right now.The trend, in short, revolves around getting down to business — specifically, the business of making money off of you and me and everyone else who uses Google services.For a while now, y'see, Google has been focusing on new areas that don't directly fit in with the company's long-standing main business model.Well, gang, that's precisely the transformation that appears to be picking up pace as we speak.And it's happening on several overlapping fronts.Grab the nearest glass of milk, and let's dive in.
Scientists are reporting the discovery of a previously unknown species of ancient human that lived in the Philippines over 50,000 years ago.At the same time, however, the fossils found in Callao Cave exhibit features unlike anything ever seen before, thus warranting the declaration of a completely new human species, Homo luzonensis.The discovery of Homo luzonensis, with its curious set of physical characteristics, is telling us some surprising new things about human evolution and what happened to the pioneering hominins who left Africa so long ago.A butchered animal bone found at the Kalinga site in Luzon, Philippines, showed hominins were active on the island as far back as 709,000 years ago.Incredibly, this dispersal happened long before our species, Homo sapiens, emerged; we finally entered onto the scene 300,000 years ago, spilling into Eurasia about 100,000 years later.The scientists who found the human foot bone in the Philippines, a team led by Florent Détroit from the National Museum of Natural History in France and Armand Mijares from the University of the Philippines, kept working at Callao Cave in an effort to find more clues.
the fossil Record in the Philippines points to the discovery of a new human species.It is about the remnants of at least three individuals who lived for at least 50,000 years ago.In a cave at the foot of the Sierra Madre mountains on the island of Luzon has 13 fossils of bones and teeth found, but no skallfragment.Researchers call the extinct människoarten of H. luzonensis.It is the second time since the turn of the millennium, as a former branch of the människofamiljen have been found in south-east Asia.In a cave on the indonesian island of Flores was excavated in 2003 fossils of dvärgmänniskan Homo sapiens.
Bones from this ancient creature were dated to around 50,000 years, and depict a combination of features not found together in any other Homo species.They’re also quite similar to the hobbit-like bones discovered in 2016 on an Indonesian island to the south.The so-called hobbits (Homo floresiensis) were discovered on the island of Flores, Indonesia back in 2004.Skeletons found were on average around 1.1 m (3 ft 7 in) tall, and dated to around 50,000 years, possibly overlapping the timeframe Homo luzonensis lived on Earth.Excavations were done in 2007, 2011, and 2015 at Callao Cave in Luzon, in the municipality of Peñablanca, Cagayan province, in the Philippines.During these excavations, a collection of H. luzonensis fossils were found.
Anthropologists may have discovered a new human relative in the Philippines.A new study discusses how H. luzonensis shares traits with both older human ancestors like Australopithecus and Homo erectus, and also modern-day humans.Not all anthropologists are convinced it is a new species, but the discovery indicates this time period in our evolutionary history was far more complicated that scientists thought.That includes everything from stone tool-wielding Homo erectus to our Neanderthal cousins.The new study describes the discovery of additional fossils — several other foot and hand bones, a partial thigh bone, and seven teeth — in Callao Cave, which helped anthropologists determine that a previously undiscovered ancient hominin once lived on Luzon tens of thousands of years ago."Overall these teeth and bones have a striking combination of characteristics never before reported together in a hominin species," Matthew Tocheri, an anthropologist from Lakehead University in Ontario who was not involved in the study, wrote in a follow-up article for Nature.
With new genome analysis tools, scientists have made significant advances in our understanding of modern humans' origins and ancient migrations.But trying to find ancient DNA, let alone prove that the ancient DNA is ancestral to a population living today is extremely challenging.A new study in Molecular Biology and Evolution (MBE) adds to this understanding by reconstructing artificial genomes with the analyses of the genome of 565 contemporary South Asian individuals to extract ancient signals that recapitulate the long history of human migration and admixture in the region."All in all, our results provide a proof-of-principle for the feasibility of retrieving ancient genetic signals from contemporary human subjects, as if they were genomes from the past embedded in amber," said Luca Pagani, the research coordinator of the study.The study was led by Burak Yelmen and Mayukh Mondal from the Institute of Genomics of the University of Tartu, Estonia and coordinated by Luca Pagani from the same institution and from the University of Padova, Italy."The genetic components we managed to extract from modern genomes are invaluable, given the shortage of ancient DNA available from South Asian human remains, and allow us to elucidate the genetic composition of the ancient populations that inhabited the area," said Burak Yelmen, co-first author of the study.
'New technology baffles pissed old hack' ( Private Eye)My birthday is still eight months away but time waits for no homo sapiens bearing the DNA stamp of either/both X and/or Y-chromosomed gender fascism.If you were affected by the issues raised, etc.)The first hint of accelerated decrepitude, as Pris famously put it, was laid bare when the invitation arrived: "Come and join us for a celebratory dinner to mark 30 years of CorelDraw!"If you're interested in such things, Adobe InDesign will be 20 years old this August, and both Illustrator and QuarkXPress are already 32.From its fast and furious early versions, it embarked on a relentless acquisition drive, swallowing utility programs, ultra-crappo fonts and cheesy clip art with the appetite of Val Kilmer in an all-you-can-eat doughnut store, rapidly swelling into the very epitome of bloatware.
Bones recently found in a Siberian cave have given researchers a new glimpse into the timeline of an extinct human species.The species – known as Denisovans – at one time lived alongside Neanderthals in the same cave, the evidence showed.“Denisovans are a sister group to Neanderthals – that is, they are closer in terms of shared ancestry to Neanderthals than they are to modern humans,” study leader and geochronologist Dr. Richard Roberts of Australia’s University of Wollongong told Fox News.“We know almost nothing about the physical appearance of the Denisovans, as we only have a few teeth (which are quite chunky) and even fewer scraps of bone.”2.1-BILLION-YEAR-OLD FOSSIL MAY BE EVIDENCE OF EARLIEST MOVING LIFE-FORMA new study revealed that the Denisovans lived in the cave from at least 200,000 to less than 50,000 years ago.
Two papers published yesterday in Nature present an updated timeline for the occupation of Denisova cave by Neanderthals and Denisovans.The new research suggests the Denisovans—a sister species to the Neanderthals—made this cave their home for a longer period than Neanderthals, first venturing into the cave as far back as 287,000 years ago.It’s further evidence that Neanderthals and Denisovans interbred—and that this co-mingling happened at or near Denisova.(Image: Sergey Zelinski, Russian Academy of Sciences)Archaeologists and palaeontologists have carefully sifted through Denisova cave for the past 40 years, pulling out various animal and Neanderthal bones.Compiling a timeline of events, such as when the cave was first occupied and by whom, has proven tough, in part due to the large size of the cave and its complex layers of sediment; the cave’s stratigraphy encompasses both the Siberian Middle Paleolithic period (between 340,000 and 45,000 years ago) and the Initial Upper Paleolithic period (roughly 45,000 to 40,000 years ago).
Two papers published yesterday in Nature present an updated timeline for the occupation of Denisova cave by Neanderthals and Denisovans.The new research suggests the Denisovans—a sister species to the Neanderthals—made this cave their home for a longer period than Neanderthals, first venturing into the cave as far back as 287,000 years ago.It’s further evidence that Neanderthals and Denisovans interbred—and that this co-mingling happened at or near Denisova.(Image: Sergey Zelinski, Russian Academy of Sciences)Archaeologists and palaeontologists have carefully sifted through Denisova cave for the past 40 years, pulling out various animal and Neanderthal bones.Compiling a timeline of events, such as when the cave was first occupied and by whom, has proven tough, in part due to the large size of the cave and its complex layers of sediment; the cave’s stratigraphy encompasses both the Siberian Middle Paleolithic period (between 340,000 and 45,000 years ago) and the Initial Upper Paleolithic period (roughly 45,000 to 40,000 years ago).
Buried deep within the DNA of Asian individuals is a genetic clue pointing to the existence of an unknown human ancestor.Remarkably, it wasn’t a human who reached this startling conjecture, but rather an artificially intelligent algorithm.Welcome to archaeology in the 21st century.New research published last week in Nature Communications suggests a yet-to-be discovered hominid interbred with modern humans tens of thousands of years ago.This mystery species eventually went extinct, but an AI developed by researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE) and several other European institutions found traces of its existence in the DNA of present-day people with Asian ancestry.A press release issued by the Centre for Genomic Regulation said it’s the first time deep learning has been used to explain human history, “paving the way for this technology to be applied in other questions in biology, genomics and evolution.”
Well, computers programmed by AI-wielding bio-boffinsThe human genome is hiding secrets that point to a mystery ancestor alongside our hominid cousins the Neanderthals and Denisovans, according to AI software.Homo sapiens, the only surviving species in the homo genus, once bred with its extinct relatives homo neanderthalensis and denisova hominins hundreds of thousands of years ago.The evidence is in our genes todya, and from fossil records unearthed in caves across the world.It is estimated that people of European and Asian descent have about two per cent Neanderthal DNA, while people from the Pacific Islanders are more likely to have inherited some Denisovan DNA.But there are gaps in our knowledge, for example, some fragments of our genetic blueprint don’t match up to any known homonid species, and these have left scientists scratching their heads.
Some of the big events included some major fossil finds, a new understanding of our reptile ancestors and a major controversy whose outcome could rewrite human history.In January Roberto Macchiarelli, a professor of human paleontology, accused his colleague Michel Brunet of totally misrepresenting an important piece of evidence in the story of human evolution.But if it turns out not to be a hominin, evolutionary history shifts once more.Asians originated from the Asian Homo erectus, Europeans from the neanderthal man, and Africans from the African Homo heidelbergensis.Genetic analysis showed that this trait of the incisors was merely a side effect of adaptation to a cold environment.The gene that controls for the shovel-like incisors also coincidentally decreases the number of sweat glands and enriches mothers’ milk with fat.
The ad will star an Alexa-like personal digital assistant that is heartbroken over the fact that it cannot taste Pringles.Like last year’s effort (Pringles’ first commercial foray into the game), this year’s spot will be themed around “Flavor Stacking,” the practice of combining two or more varieties of Pringles to create whatever flavor the consumer desires.Introducing the concept in 2018 was comedian Bill Hader who, with the help of two daffy assistants, created “Jalapeno Barbecue Pizza” by sandwiching three chips with those respective flavors.Speculation over what celebrity may star in this year’s ad may have been laid to rest with the appearance of an Alexa-like device that volunteers its lament over the fact that Pringles are a delight that only homo sapiens can enjoy.“This year’s ad imagines the extreme sadness one would feel if they couldn’t enjoy the taste of Pringles,” Pringles vice president of marking AnneMarie Suarez-Davis explained in a statement.Of course, a digital assistant can’t really feel true sadness either, but suspension of disbelief seems key to enjoying this effort.
Entrepreneurs all know that Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning are hot topics of focus among startups.Recently, Founder Institute CEO Adeo Ressi sat down to discuss the future of AI and Robotics Startups and Venture Capital with a panel of renowned machine learning experts from Philips Health, Uber ATC, Carnegie Mellon University, and the Robotics Hub.You can also view the complete Future of Artificial Intelligence Startups and Venture Capital webinar video here, or listen to the conversation in full on the Founder Insights Podcast.When an investor sees artificial intelligence or machine learning referenced in a pitch deck, the first question they will always ask is,What kind of algorithm is your solution actually using here?According to featured panelist Jeff Schneider (Engineering Lead at Uber ATC & Professor at Carnegie Mellon), entrepreneurs should be driven by results and not simply driven to employ any particular technology,
(Philipp Gunz (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0))The shape of your brain may say a lot about the Neanderthal in you.New research has found that modern humans carrying certain genetic fragments from our closest extinct relatives may have more oblong brains and skulls than other people.Modern humans possess unique, relatively globular skulls and brains.Previous research had suggested these contrasting skull shapes might reflect differences in the size of various brain regions in modern humans and Neanderthals, and how these brain areas were wired together."However, brain tissue doesn't fossilize, so the underlying biology has remained elusive," co-lead study author Philipp Gunz, a paleoanthropologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, told Live Science.
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