By accounting for inertial forces, the new design can reduce the metabolic energy required by the user
Several genetic and structural analyses have identified a key feature of this virus—a protein on the surface—which may explain why it is so susceptible to infect human cells.Stinging intruder To infect cells, coronaviruses use a "spike" protein (S protein) to bind to the cell membrane, and the process is activated by specific cellular enzymes.Li Hua, a structural biologist at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, said it was significant because Flynn proteases are present in a large number of human tissues, including the lung, liver, and small intestine, which means that the virus has the potential to attack multiple organs.He said SARS and other coronaviruses, which belong to the same family as the new virus, do not have Flynn protease activation sites.Gary Whittaker, a virologist at Cornell University in New York, said the Flynn protease activation site makes the virus enter cells in a very different way than SARS and may affect the stability of the virus and thus affect transmission.They point out that these sites are also present in other viruses that are easily transmitted from person to person, including severe influenza virus strains.
Semiconductors represent the cornerstone technology of the information age.These tiny devices power the world’s modern economies by serving as the data-processing brains in a wide range of products, from personal computers and smartphones to cars and spacecraft.Despite hefty investments in the semiconductor industry over the years, China remains dependent on the US for high-end integrated circuits.Zhou Zhiping, a Peking University professor of microelectronics, spoke to the South China Morning Post on the sidelines of the Smart China Expo held last month in the southwestern city of Chongqing.Zhou was a founder and vice president of production of the Hengnan Transistor Factory in China from 1971 to 1978 and a guest scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the US from 1987 to 1989.He is now a Changjiang professor at Peking University and guest chief scientist of Chongqing-based semiconductor firm United Microelectronics Center.
A collaborative investigation has revealed new insight into how room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) conduct electricity, which may have a great potential impact for the future of energy storage.The research focuses on the debate surrounding the physical mechanism of the electrical conductivity of RTILs.Their charged positive and negative organic ions lead them to be good conductors, but the conductivity seems paradoxical.Their high conductivity arises from their high density of charged ions within the liquid, but this density should also mean that the positive and negative ions are close enough to neutralise one another, creating new, neutral particles which cannot support an electrical current.The modelling attempts to identify how conductivity is maintained in RTILs in light of these contradictory factors.The research involved an international group of researchers, including Professor Nikolai Brilliantov of the University of Leicester and led by Professor Alexei Kornyshev of Imperial College London and Professor Guang Feng of the Huazhong University of Science and Technology.
Spider silk is incredible stuff.It is one the strongest materials in the world for its weight, and its potential uses are hugely diverse, from building armor to creating artificial skin and helping people with injuries and disabilities by treating spinal cord damage or improving the microphones in hearing aids.Now researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have discovered a new property of this remarkable natural material that could make it the robotic muscle of the future.When the air around the fibers reaches a certain level of relative humidity, they suddenly twist and contract.This contraction is strong enough that it could potentially be used as an actuator, for example to open a valve.This was tested by suspending a weight from a silk strand and enclosing it within a chamber.
The resilient fibers, the team discovered, respond very strongly to changes in humidity.Above a certain level of relative humidity in the air, they suddenly contract and twist, exerting enough force to potentially be competitive with other materials being explored as actuators -- devices that move to perform some activity such as controlling a valve.The findings are being reported today in the journal Science Advances, in a paper by MIT Professor Markus Buehler, head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, along with former postdoc Anna Tarakanova and undergraduate student Claire Hsu at MIT; Dabiao Liu, an associate professor at Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China; and six others."It's a new phenomenon," Buehler says.The team tested a number of other materials, including human hair, but found no such twisting motions in the others they tried."It's very precise in how you can control these motions by controlling the humidity."
Founded in 2001, Hikvision has morphed from a former Chinese government research institute into a US$39 billion business specializing in professional video surveillance cameras.Headquartered in Hangzhou in eastern China and listed on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange, Hikvision has been a supplier to hundreds of government-led surveillance projects in major cities including Shanghai, Hangzhou, and Urumqi, where its cameras can take clear shots of vehicles and passengers even in poor visibility conditions.Hikvision expanded into the consumer space in 2013 with Ezviz, a brand that makes surveillance equipment for the home and office.Around 42 percent of the company is controlled by state-owned enterprises, with China Electronics Technology HIK Group owning 39.6 percent of the company as the biggest shareholder.Along with two alumni from Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Hikvision chairman Chen Zongnian, 54, started the company while he was working in a research division of China Electronics Technology Group Corporation.The global video surveillance equipment market was expected to grow 10.2 percent to US$18.5 billion in 2018, thanks to increasing demand for security cameras, according to a report by London-based market research firm IHS Markit last July.
Condensation heat transfer plays an essential role in the efficiency of various energy-intensive industrial technologies including power generation, energy utilization, water desalination and harvesting, air-conditioning, and thermal management of electronics.It is well known that dropwise condensation on the hydrophobic surface (Fig.Promoting dropwise condensation by surface modification has thus been of great interest since its discovery.Metallic micro-networks with interweaving liquid channels, such as copper micro-meshes and micro-foams, have been widely exploited in various industrial applications including oil-water separation and catalyst support medium due to their low cost and good scalability.These copper meshes and foams have also been used to improve liquid wicking capability for high-heat-flux boiling and evaporation heat transfer.However, the systematic study on the fundamental mechanism of vapor condensation on the woven meshes is still lacking.
A non-invasive approach for creating an optical window in the skull to enable the brains of living mice to be imaged has been demonstrated.Prof. Dan Zhu and coworkers from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, tested the use of optical clearing agents (OCAs) that they applied to the bare skulls (hair and skin removed) of living mice.Combined with two-photon microscopy, this technique allows imaging of the fine structures of neurons, glia and the microvasculature in the mouse brain.Given its easy handling, safety, repeatability and excellent performance, this method has promise in neuroscience research.The research has been published in journal Light: Science and Applications on February 23rd, an open access journal from Nature Publishing Group.However, the strong scattering caused by the skull over the cortex limits the penetration depth of light in tissues, and thus hinders the observation of fluorescently labeled neuronal structures and microvasculature.
It gives a visual representation of physical pain, similar to what humans feel on the skin say researchers.Researchers at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China have taken inspiration from a jellyfish to develop a type of artificial skin that reacts to "pain" by glowing.Their research paper also mentions that artificial skins usually work "based on single response mode for pressure sensing".What that means is that artificial skins, while good at sensing if there is pressure, do not do well beyond a certain pressure threshold.They are like switches that register pressure, but cannot really feel how much of it is being applied.Artificial skins easily get damaged because of the lack of sensitivity beyond a certain point.
WASHINGTON -- An estimated 5.5 million Americans live with Alzheimer's disease, a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior.Qingming Luo's Visible Brain-wide Networks team at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China developed a system called cryo-micro-optical sectioning tomography (cryo-MOST) that improves the ability to image these senile plaques in the whole mouse brain."Studying the brain-wide distribution of senile plaques in mice will facilitate an understanding of how brain functions deteriorate during Alzheimer's disease progression," said Jing Yuan, a key member of the research team.In The Optical Society (OSA) journal Optics Letters, the researchers detail their cryo-MOST system and report results from using it to create 3D, micron-resolution maps of senile plaques throughout the brain of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.The new system is simple and efficient compared with conventional approaches, requires no external dyes or labels, and because it is optical, offers more detailed information than other imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or Positron Emission Tomography (PET).Chilling tissue to enhance imaging
Our current solution to apples that start to soften just bake them into a pie has been working well for hundreds of years.But a new method could give us apples that stay crisp for several weeks.A team of researchers used a specially designed plasma tool, based on one that had been used in hospitals to disinfect wounds, to wipe out the bacteria on the surface of the apple.They found that, when given a blast with this tool, the apples stayed fresh for considerably longer.Their results are published in a paper in Physics of Plasmas.Fruits or vegetables turn bad mainly due to the bacteria, co-author Xinpei Lu of China s Huazhong University of Science and Technology told Gizmodo.
Our current solution to apples that start to soften just bake them into a pie has been working darn well.But a new method could give us apples that stay crisp for several weeks.A team of researchers used a specially designed plasma tool, based on one that had been used in hospitals to disinfect wounds, to wipe out the bacteria on the surface of the apple.They found that, when given a blast with this tool, the apples stayed fresh for considerably longer.Their results are published today in a paper in Physics of Plasmas.Fruits or vegetables turn bad mainly due to the bacteria, co-author Xinpei Lu of China s Huazhong University of Science and Technology told Gizmodo.
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