No, we're not talking about skulking off to the shady corners of the interwebs and dabbling in illicit downloads.Based on extensive interviews with the late Joe Strummer and his gang, it runs at 40 minutes in five sections: perfect commuting fodder.This Valve-funded doc follows the lives of three pro Dota 2 players, all of them hungry for the grand US$1million prize at a tournament, making for a very enticing watch.Its classic movies are even neatly arranged into genres for themed film nights.As the name suggests, it gathers copyright-free documentaries, from the likes of Louis Theroux and Stephen Hawking.Internet Archive: Better known for the Wayback Machine a digital DeLorean for looking at how sites have changed over the years , the Internet Archive also has over 20,000 free films in its vaults.
The controversial subpoenas, which allow the feds to obtain customer records and transaction data from internet service providers and other companies without a court order, come with a perpetual gag order that prevents recipients from disclosing that they ve received an NSL.We believe this is an important step toward enriching a more open and transparent discussion about the legal authorities law enforcement can leverage to access user data, Chris Madsen, Yahoo s head of global law enforcement, security and safety, wrote in a blog post about the disclosure.The FBI has issued more than 300,000 NSLs since 2000.Only four other NSL recipients since 9/11 have publicly disclosed that they received letters, following legal battles.These included the Internet Archive, a group of librarians in Connecticut, a university in North Carolina, and Nicholas Merrill, the founder of Calyx Internet Access, who won a six-year battle to be released from the gag order he received in 2004.Last month that court ruled that the gag order challenge was no longer relevant because the USA Freedom Act had successfully addressed the issue of gag orders.
Although the internet has created millions of new opportunities for people around the world and made the sum of human knowledge available to anyone with a connection, it s also created problems that seem impossible to solve.Edward Snowden showed we ve inadvertently built the world s largest surveillance network with the web, said Brewster Kahle, who heads up Internet Archive.Along with luminaries like TCP/IP protcol co-creator Vint Cerf, Mozilla Project leader Mitchell Baker and Electronic Frontier Foundation special advisor Cory Doctorow, they ve gathered at the Decentralized Web Summit in San Francisco to discuss how this new kind of internet can be created and sustained.Participants and speakers also mulled over the use of increased encryption and methods to bring more accountability, as well as to reduce content creators and publishers dependence on ad revenue by developing secure, direct cryptocurrency-based payment methods for subscribers.But while it s comforting to know that such great minds are coming together to address these issues that affect every Web user, it s scary to think that it was us humans that polluted the internet and turned it into what it is today – and in all probability, we ll ruin the next great network too.The Decentralized Web Summit is on from June 8-9 and you can catch the livestream on the event s ZeroNet site.
But what if we could create a decentralized web, with more privacy, less government control, and less corporate influence?Sir Tim recently gathered some top computer scientists in a San Francisco church at an event called the Decentralized Web Summit, where attendees brainstormed ways to make the internet more broadly distributed.The smartest technologists on the planet showed up to join the discussions including early internet architect Vint Cerf and Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive.Every discussion was focused on how to distribute, process, and host data with no centralized control.Instead, they are looking at ways web pages are created, named, and managed.Tim Berners-Lee has actually been beating this drum for years.
But what if we could create a decentralised web, with more privacy, less government control, and less corporate influence?Sir Tim recently gathered some top computer scientists in a San Francisco church at an event called the Decentralized Web Summit, where attendees brainstormed ways to make the internet more broadly distributed.The smartest technologists on the planet showed up to join the discussions including early internet architect Vint Cerf and Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive.During the summit, dozens of sessions were held about creating an internet with no central control.Instead, they are looking at ways web pages are created, named, and managed.Berners-Lee has actually been beating this drum for years.
In the same way, the web browsers of the future might not be able to open today s webpages and images–if future historians are lucky enough to have copies of today s websites at all.But if Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle, Cerf, and their allies who recently came together at what they called the Decentralized Web Summit have their way, the world will one day have a web that archives itself and backs itself up automatically.The IPFS team is already hard at work on a feature that would allow a web app to keep trucking along even if the original server disappears, and it s already built a chat app to demonstrate the concept.Today s web isn t just a collection of static HTML files; it s dynamic apps like Facebook, Twitter, and Slack.Does anyone in the future really need to see old drunken college photos or inadvisable Facebook rants?Still, those blacklists themselves become a reminder of the things we re trying to forget.
Internet ArchiveAn angry group of former customers has sued a collapsed Bitcoin mining company, GAW Miners, in a proposed class-action lawsuit.Carlos Garza: "I want to help, but l'd have to have an attorney present."According to the suit, which was filed last week, GAW founders Joshua Homero Garza and Stuart Fraser who at the time was a vice president at the investment firm Cantor Fitzgerald scammed those that paid money, believing they were getting something for that payment.The four named plaintiffs, who seek unspecified damages, hope to represent the approximately 10,000 customers that they say were taken for a ride by Garza and Fraser.Because defendants sold far more computing power than they owned and dedicated to virtual currency mining with respect to hosted mining services and Hashlets , they owed investors a return that was larger than any actual return they were making on their limited mining operations.Neither Garza, nor Fraser, nor Garza s attorneys have responded to Ars request for comment.
You may have seen some chatter here and there about the decentralized web — it s something passionately pursued by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, for instance.But there isn t a really clear definition of what the term means — and really, considering its nature, it would be surprising if there were.There are, therefore, a variety of opinions, as Syracuse University s School of Information found out when they pinged two dozen tech experts and leaders.Brewster Kahle of the Internet Archive takes a literal but admirably concise approach: Websites served from many locations; locations that are not coordinated.Arizona State s Eric Newton took to metaphor: It is to communication what local farming is to food.With it people can grow their own information.
When David Filo and Jerry Yang created Yahoo in 1995, it was nothing more than a simple list of links, a guide to the open web that new websites clamored to be featured on.Now, fast-forward more than ten years, and Verizon is acquiring it for $4.8 billion.Thanks to The Internet Archive, we can revisit the early days and see exactly what Yahoo used to look like.Take a trip down memory lane...  View As:
Nintendo is continuing to give back to the gaming community — or at least the nostalgic members.As we get ready for the mini NES to drop this Fall, Nintendo has made the first 13 years of Nintendo Power available online for free.Via Internet Archive, we get a page-by-page digital recreation of all the original magazines.Each is just as you left them, too.Starting with a huge walkthrough of Super Mario 2 my favorite in the series; come at me , the magazines quickly get into Castlevania and Ninja Gaiden !before wrapping it up in 2001 with a spread on the Game Boy Advanced.
Looking for the hottest gaming news of 1988?Or a guide to Bionic Commando?The Internet Archive now plays host to 143 issues of the American title, which ran from 1988 to 2012.Originally published by Nintendo of America itself, it later went independent but retained its reputation to a generation of gamers as the place to go for news, reviews, and player guides to the toughest titles on Nintendo's consoles.The collection offers complete issues from 1988 through to 2001 – a journey that takes readers from the heyday of the original NES through to the then-imminent launch of the original Game Boy Advance.The magazine would run for another 142 issues, ending on December 11, 2012 with issue 285, though at present there's no sign of those later volumes.
Mozilla is trying out a new feature in Firefox that lets you smash through annoying 404 dead-ends.The "404 No More" feature uses copies of webpages from the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine to replace 404 "not found" error pages with something more useful.If you visit a link to a page that's disappeared, Firefox will fetch from archive.org a version of the page before it vanished.We have no doubt the feature will be useful on most occasions, although on certain websites the 404 page can end up being more amusing than the page you were actually trying to load.For the record, this is what happens when you encounter a 404 error on El Reg.To try "404 No More", Firefox users will have to install Firefox Test Pilot, a browser plugin for English-language Windows, OS X and Linux Firefox builds that lets you experiment with in-development features.
Users of the new feature-testing version of Mozilla's Firefox are now being treated to an extra bit of help when trying to track down incriminating things that have been deleted from the web -- links to automatically trawled copies of broken pages from the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine.Try to visit a missing page when using the Test Pilot version of Firefox and it'll pop up a message saying it can't find it alongside the actual 404 error message, then ask the user if he or she would instead like to see an old version pulled out from the Wayback Machine, should one exist.So nothing can ever be deleted ever again.Hooray, or oh dear, depending on if you're the hunter or the hunted.Firefox says it should only pop up the message when there is a saved version of the specific page in the database, so hopefully it wouldn't batter Archive.org's servers too hard should it ever hit the mainstream version of Firefox and do so well that Chrome and Microsoft inevitably nick the idea for their browsers too.Test Pilot via The Register
Users of the new feature-testing version of Mozilla's Firefox are now being treated to an extra bit of help when trying to track down incriminating things that have been deleted from the web -- links to automatically trawled copies of broken pages from the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine.Try to visit a missing page when using the Test Pilot version of Firefox and it'll pop up a message saying it can't find it alongside the actual 404 error message, then ask the user if he or she would instead like to see an old version pulled out from the Wayback Machine, should one exist.So nothing can ever be deleted ever again.Hooray, or oh dear, depending on if you're the hunter or the hunted.Firefox says it should only pop up the message when there is a saved version of the specific page in the database, so hopefully it wouldn't batter Archive.org's servers too hard should it ever hit the mainstream version of Firefox and do so well that Chrome and Microsoft inevitably nick the idea for their browsers too.Test Pilot via The Register
Nostalgia fans, strap yourselves in – if you still fondly remember playing games on the Commodore Amiga, the good news is you can relive those days, and get a slice of retro gaming action directly in your web browser.Yes, forget about messing around with emulators, ROMs and the like, because the Internet Archive has fired up a new section: a software library for the Amiga, as spotted by Ghacks.This contains a whole host of games and other software to boot that you can play simply by clicking on the title, which will load it in your browser.Do note, however, that it might take a little while for the game in question to load or a fairly long while in some cases .And further note that some games may not be functional, or may have sketchy controls.There are over 10,000 pieces of software in total, including games such as Wizball although that was originally a C64 game , Bubble Bobble, various versions of Lemmings, Bard's Tale, Marble Madness, Indianapolis 500 pictured – the first true 'racing sim', though sadly Formula One Grand Prix which followed a couple of years later isn't here and Frontier: Elite II.
We ll still be here when you get back.It s bound to be a long week.The world is coming apart at the seams.Your boss won t notice if you play a round or two of Bubble Bobble from the comfort of your own browser Firefox seems to work best on my end .We can t vouch for the quality of all of the Amiga titles that were recently posted up on Archive.org, but there sure as heck are a lot of them – 10,000 , by the site s count, including favorites as Where in the World is Carmen San Diego, King s Quest and Double Dragon, along with what looks to be a fair amount of redundancy.I m not really sure what the difference is between Deluxe Pac Man v1.1 and Deluxe Pac Man v1.7a, but I suspect it s fairly minor, even for completists.
The Internet Archive just posted what appears to be over 10,000 Amiga games online.That s a whole lot of retro.You ve got titles like Double Dragon, Batman: The Movie and Lemmings among others in the seemingly endless list.Still, if that number seems a little high, that s because it probably is.Hall of Light, a website dedicated specifically to cataloging every game released for the system, lists 5,698 games total games, so chances are there are some duplicates on the internet archive list.Not to mention we can t seem to find classics like Sid Meier s Civilization or Dune 2 .
The Internet Archive is full of surprises.The group recently added a huge trove of Amiga games and programs to its collection, bringing the total to more than 10,000.Even better: It s all available to you for playback and use in your browser.The non-profit library of digital culture first added Amiga software to its catalog in 2013.The size and scope of the new collection compared to what was added in 2013 isn't quite clear, but there s a lot of new stuff that was only recently added—4and an overwhelming amount of games.Archivist Jason Scott unofficially announced the new Amiga collection late last week on Twitter.
It might be 2016, but that doesn't mean you can't re-live the days when your parents wouldn't buy you a Megadrive, as the Internet Archive has added a library of 10,000 Amiga titles to its collection.As reported by Engadget, all of the games can be played for free online in your web browser.The site uses a Javascript based emulator to play the titles from their original code.Your mileage may vary, with some games emulating better than others.but if you get stuck you can download the original disc images and either dig out the Amiga from the attic, or play on WinUAE.Featuring everything from Pacmania to Simon the Sorcerer, the collection is a treasure trove for retro enthusiasts.
The Internet Archive is the home of our digital past, and now it s offering the greatest gift to any kid who grew up in the 80s and 90s: thousands of playable Amiga games.If you re unfamiliar with Amiga, the computer system was the technological successor of the Commodore 64, one of the most popular computers ever made.The Amiga 1000 ran on its own operating system Amiga OS , could display up to 4,096 colors, and was Commodore s heavyweight contender against Apple s Macintosh.It s still a much-loved machine to this day.As The Next Web notes, the Amiga system didn t even have 10,000 games, so the archive could probably use a little housekeeping to get rid of some duplicates.But there is some Double Dragon and Batman: The Movie along with some other titles I ve never heard of but sound A .
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