Groups like Tok the Vote believe viral clips are the best way to get young people to cast their ballots.
5
Former first lady Michelle Obama tore into Donald Trump’s handling of the coronavirus crisis in a live video Tuesday, calling Trump’s pandemic leadership “willful mismanagement” and “negligence.”“We simply cannot trust this president to tell us the truth about anything,” Obama said in her “Closing Argument,” a nearly 25-minute appeal to Americans to vote for Democratic nominee Joe Biden over Trump in next month’s presidential election.“The worst part is it didn’t have to be like this,” Obama said of the more than 210,000 coronavirus-linked deaths in the United States. “So many other countries aren’t experiencing this level of extended suffering and uncertainty.”She continued:These countries were hit by the same virus as we were. They had the same kind of resources to contain it as we did. But what they didn’t have to contend with was this president ... A man who knew how deadly this virus is but who lied to us and told us it would just disappear. Who, in the greatest crisis of our lifetimes, doubled down on division and resentment, railed against measures that could have mitigated the damage and continues to hold massive events without requiring masks or social distancing, knowingly exposing his own supporters to a dangerous virus.Obama pointed out that the number of Americans who have died from the coronavirus is roughly double the U.S. toll from wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, Vietnam and Korea combined.“That is roughly the scale of this tragedy,” Obama said. “And our commander-in-chief sadly has been missing in action. And his wilful mismanagement of the Covid crisis is just one example of his negligence.”After months of downplaying Covid-19 and mocking Biden for wearing a face mask, Trump revealed on Friday that he had tested positive for the virus. He was hospitalised later that day.On Sunday, Trump left the hospital for a brief joyride in his presidential limousine, sparking outrage from medical experts and former Secret Service agents who condemned him for putting the lives of his protective service members at risk.Trump returned to the White House on Monday to continue his treatment. Hours before leaving, he tweeted that he was feeling “really good” and encouraged Americans not to fear the virus.“Don’t be afraid of Covid,” the president wrote. “Don’t let it dominate your life.”Trump, of course, received special VIP care at a top hospital and had access to treatments the average coronavirus patient likely doesn’t have.Upon returning to the White House, Trump removed his face mask for a photo opportunity, drawing backlash for potentially endangering his staff and members of the media.“My heart goes out to everyone touched by this virus, from those at the White House, especially the Secret Service and residence staff whose service ought never be taken for granted, to all those names and stories most of us will unfortunately never know,” Obama wrote in a tweet sharing her “Closing Argument” speech.Watch Michelle Obama’s full speech below:Related... Opinion: Trump And Johnson Are Wrong – It's Vital That We're Afraid Of Coronavirus 'Gasping For Air. And Credibility': Furious Stars Tear Into Donald Trump Following Hospital Discharge Covid-Infected Trump Takes Off Mask As He Returns To White House
7
"Joe Biden was attacking President Trump as he was preparing to head to the hospital," the Trump campaign said on Twitter.
9
Spotify has announced alongside of the Obamas’ Higher Ground that Michelle Obama’s podcast — the first season, at least — has expanded to other podcast platforms. This follows the content’s exclusive availability on Spotify, which has heavily focused on growing its podcast platform. The expansion will come only a few months after The Michelle Obama Podcast‘s debut on Spotify, earning … Continue reading
9
Spotify Spotify made major headlines last year when it announced an exclusive podcast deal with the Obamas’ production studio Higher Ground. Today, the company made a perplexing about-face. The company says it’ll be releasing the first season of The Michelle Obama Podcast on “a number” of other podcast listening platforms starting tomorrow, September 30th — two weeks after the show’s season 1 finale. The company hasn’t detailed which platforms will have the show, but it’s in conversations with several, including Stitcher, Google, Apple, and iHeart. A Spotify spokesperson says future seasons, if the show’s renewed, will “debut exclusively” on Spotify, but didn’t say whether the show will be windowed or fully exclusive to the service. Obama’s... Continue reading…
7
Obama made $400,000 a year while in office — but he and Michelle reportedly signed a book deal worth at least $60 million a year after leaving.
2
When my first ultrasound scan revealed I was expecting twins, I burst into tears.Sadly, these weren’t tears of joy but tears of the realisation that I was at a pivotal crossroads in my life. I was a scared 21-year-old student, in many ways still a child, still trying to find myself and what I wanted to do with my life. And now I was going to have to figure life out while raising twins on my own?The narrative I told myself of what single motherhood was going to be like came from my own upbringing by my mum, a single mother of five. I saw a Black matriarch struggle, and I assured myself I wouldn’t end up in similar circumstances; yet unbeknownst to me, fate and poor choices in men somehow made it so.I had also inherited the deep-seated social stigmas that paint single mothers as unstable, shameful and poverty-stricken. As a woman, I am forced to make choices in life that are more costly than those of men; such as choosing children over a career. As a Black woman, these weighty choices feel even more stark knowing the old adage that, because I am Black, I have to work twice as hard to get half as far.There is too the stereotype that Afro-Caribbean women like me disproportionately have children outside of marriage and from multiple fathers. This stems from racist perceptions of Black families that neglect to consider the effects of historical racism, relationships within Black families, and even slavery as victims of sexual abuse from slaveholders. Throughout modern history Black families have been portrayed as dysfunctional ,with the archetype of the mature and stern Black women as the head of the family, and the young, sexually immoral black women dismissing stable relationships.Somehow I felt more judged for deciding to keep my twins because, in society’s eyes I was 'just another' single Black mum.These racist and sexist interactions shaped how I was to perceive myself as a young, Black woman and as a mother. Somehow I felt more judged for deciding to keep my twins, because in society’s eyes I was ‘just another’ single Black mum adding to the phenomenon of Black and other ethnic minority mothers being more likely to be single parents. This depleted my self-esteem in my early motherhood – I felt as though I had resigned myself to a life of obscurity, and fell into postpartum depression. What got me through those dark days was holding tightly onto the glimmer of hope that things would get better for me somehow, and my connection with God. Through these, I came to better understand who I was, and what I wanted out of life.The turning point was acknowledging that I had my final year at university waiting to be finished. I did not want to live with the regret of having started something and not see it through – becoming a mother was the driving force I needed to complete my degree in psychology. Yet, this transition wouldn’t have been possible without the much-needed support system: my mum, their grandma, and my extended family, thanks to the tradition of kinship within Caribbean families.At times, I overburdened them with childcare, but nevertheless their help made it possible for me to sustain myself. I travelled to and from university 125 miles away twice a week, interned throughout my final year, and put blood, sweat and (many) tears into my dissertation, all the while visualising myself in a graduation gown with my babies beside me.Graduating gifted me the confidence and reassurance in myself I had so desired and needed.  It allowed me to break away from the internalised stigmatisation and negative thought patterns I had accepted.Graduating gifted me the confidence and reassurance in myself I had so desired and needed.  It allowed me to break away from the internalised stigmatisation and negative thought patterns I had accepted. I learned to take back control of my life. And not only did graduating gave me an opportunity to help create a better future for my children in the absence of their father, it also imparted in me a sense of freedom, growth and pride that allows me to have the professional identity and future I had always sought.As Malcolm X said, “education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today”. With that zeal behind me, I realised that in order for me to be the best mum I could be, I needed to continue to follow and fulfil my life goals and dreams. For me, that meant going back to university again and begin postgraduate study, with the aspiration of a career in child psychotherapy.I saw how important education was for me. It has allowed me to have my own identity separate from the title of ‘mum’. It allowed me to recreate myself, and defy society’s perception of what it means to be a young, Black single parent.It was Michelle Obama who spoke of the significance of investing not just in your children, but investing in yourself too, to show your kids it’s okay to ‘put yourself a little higher on your priority list’. The secret to a happy child is a happy mum, after all.Rochelle Rodney is a mum and postgraduate student Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal I’m Hosting #BlackVoicesHPUK, A New HuffPost Series About Being Black In Britain. Here’s Why I’m A Black Police Officer. This Is What I Know About Racism And Inequality I Look White To Many. I’m Black. This Is What White People Say To Me
8
Jean-Raymond, of the Pyer Moss label, will combine fashion, music, philanthropy, and art in the platform, which will include an incubator program.
2
Here are the top media and advertising stories from Business Insider for September 10.
4
In 2014, a study found that three-quarters of white people don’t have any non-white friends.The study, reported by The Washington Post and conducted by the Public Religion Research Institute, found that for every 100 friends a white American had, 91 were white. On average they had one Black friend, one Asian friend, one Latino friend, one mixed-race friend and three friends of unknown race.By comparison, the average Black American had eight white friends and 83 Black friends, in a 100-friend scenario.The sad reality is that, as adults, we tend to be racially segregated in our friendships. While interracial friendships are fairly commonplace during our school years, studies have shown that children entering adolescence are less likely to maintain cross-racial friendships as they grow older. If a white child has a friend of colour, it’s likely that the friend is a minority in a mostly white community, said Beverly Daniel Tatum, a psychologist and author of “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? and Other Conversations About Race.”“Then, as those friends of colour approach adolescence, they start to become aware of experiences with racism, from name-calling and racial profiling in stores or by police, to social exclusion ― not being invited to teenage birthday parties, for instance,” she told HuffPost. If the child of colour is being teased or excluded, and the white friend doesn’t speak up, or worse, participates in the teasing or excluding, “the cross-racial friendship will eventually unravel,” Daniel Tatum said. Developing cross-racial friendships is even more difficult in adulthood. Outside of maybe bonding with a co-worker of a different race, we mostly adhere to our geographic segregation and stay socially segregated, too. The barrier to befriending someone is even higher when the person of colour thinks their otherwise friendly white co-worker or neighbour is closed off to learning about what it means to be white in a race-conscious society. “It’s possible to learn some of that in the context of a cross-racial friendship, but it’s easier to become friends with a person of colour if some of that work has already been done,” Daniel Tatum said. “If one friend is always in the role of teacher and the other is always in the role of learner, their friendship lacks reciprocity.”When it comes to friendship, it takes two to tango ― and two to understand the racial heaviness of this current moment. As anti-racism protests broke out in America this spring, many white people probably told their Black friends, “I had no idea this kind of stuff was still happening. Why didn’t you tell me?” It speaks to the superficiality of many cross-racial friendships. As mixed-race best friends Aminatou Sow and Ann Friedman write in their new book, “Big Friendship,” genuine friendship requires honest dialogue across colour lines. “There is no way to be intimately close with people if you refuse to engage in the truth of how the world is organised,” Sow said recently in an interview with The New York Times. “For a lot of people, conversations about race are new. Most of those people I would venture to guess are white.”Ketsia Gustave, a Haitian American writer in South Florida, has only two interracial friendships for that very reason: It’s hard to see someone as an emotionally supportive friend when they’re ill at ease talking about the racial micro-aggressions (and worse) you encounter regularly. How aggressive a police officer acted while pulling you over, for example, or the white woman at the store who cut in line as if you didn’t exist.“I think the real reason these friendships are hard to maintain is that in order to be truly authentic, I need to feel like I can share all the parts of myself with my friends,” she said. “If I can’t do that, our ‘friendship’ isn’t as close as the ones I have with my Black friends and other POC.” White people tend to think that the answer to racial injustice is to foster cross-racial friendships while POC are often, in my experience, looking for friends who will join the struggle for genuine equity.David W. Swanson, a Chicago pastorGustave has a white friend at work whom she’s close to, but she’s wary of bringing up her own subjective experiences with race because of how past conversations about politics played out. “She disagreed with Colin Kaepernick kneeling in peaceful protest duringthe national anthem a few years ago, so from then on, I steered clear of politics or anything that could lead to it,” she said. David W. Swanson is a pastor and the author of “Rediscipling the White Church: From Cheap Diversity to True Solidarity.” His closest and longest cross-racial friendship is with an African American man he met in graduate school. The two instantly bonded over church ministry experience and have remained close since.“We’ve been there for our children’s births and through many ups and downs,” Swanson said. “I simply cannot imagine my life without this friend.” The friendship itself is built on shared experiences and trust ― race certainly isn’t something that’s constantly discussed ― but that trust wouldn’t exist if Swanson hadn’t been interested in learning about his friend’s experiences, even at the expense of his own comfort. “You have to choose to prioritise racial justice, even when it’s outside of your comfort zone,” he said. Too often, according to Swanson, white people seem to struggle with cross-racial friendships because they don’t need to be cross-culturally competent in this society. “While POC have the skills to navigate diverse relationships, white people often lack the experience and empathy to do the same,” he said. “White people tend to think that the answer to racial injustice is to foster cross-racial friendships while POC are often, in my experience, looking for friends who will join the struggle for genuine equity.” How cross-racial friendships can make us better people, if we’re willing to get real about race. We all benefit from cross-racial friendships, but if we’re being honest, white people may benefit a little bit more ― at least currently, said Deborah L. Plummer, a psychologist and author of “Some of My Friends Are... : The Daunting Challenges and Untapped Benefits of Cross-Racial Friendships.”“When a white person travels through life with a friend of a different race, they get to understand and witness how the dynamics of privilege plays out,” Plummer said.“It allows them to really find a way to claim their white identity apart from that of a historical oppressor,” she explained. “They get to practice being anti-racists. They gain a positive white identity that is aligned with being a fully authentic human being.”So then, what do people of colour gain from befriending a white person?“I think many BIPOC have done the emotional work of racial identity resolution independent of having cross-racial friends,” Plummer said. “But it’s a far more nuanced, layered and conclusive resolution when we have cross-racial friends.”The psychologist believes that cross-racial friendships can reduce the widening racial divide that affects the quality of our lives ― but only if friends are mutually learning from each other and listening with humility. The white friend in particular has to learn to be OK discussing uncomfortable aspects of race, said Tabitha Purple, a pastor in London whose oldest friend is white. “We have a genuine friendship, one that’s full of honesty and love,” Purple said. “When we were younger, she was probably way more aware of the world than me, to be honest. This friend is comfortable talking about systemic racism and never writes off whole groups of people.” What’s more, Purple’s friend accepts that sometimes she might get things wrong. The pastor said she often hears white people say they fear they’ll say something that could be interpreted as racist in conversation with someone who’s Black. “White people need to accept that making a mistake is part of the process to learn and grow to be anti-racist,” she said. “Fear of saying the wrong thing props up the system. That fear shouldn’t be used as an excuse to not make real friends across the colour lines, so to speak.”That’s something Danny Richardson and Erin “Big Debo” Ridgeway have learned in their eight years of friendship. The pair host the podcast “My Black Friend,” where they discuss race-related issues in a lighthearted way.Over the years, Ridgeway has nudged Richardson to think beyond his own experiences as a white person.“I think the main thing I learned through our friendship is just listen,” Richardson said. “Stop trying to assume you know what everyone is going through. You may hear their experiences, but that doesn’t mean you know what it’s like to actually experience them.”Ridgeway says that many of his relationships with white people feel one-sided and inauthentic, but that’s not the case with Richardson. “That’s because we have had those tough conversations dealing with race and racial injustice. Danny is more aware,” Ridgeway said.Knowing what he knows now, Richardson tries to encourage others to recognise their privilege and understand the covert ways race works in our society. That’s the biggest benefit of truly listening to someone’s lived experiences and contrasting it with yours, he said.The bottom line, Ridgeway said, “is you can’t call yourself someone’s real friend if you’re OK or all right with them being mistreated.” Blissed Connections is an editorial series from HuffPost US that explores practical ways to strengthen and deepen the relationships you have — or want to have — with the people in your life.Related... The 'Work Staycation' Is On The Rise. Here's Why People Are Doing It How To Turn An Acquaintance Into A Good Friend 20 Things We've All Learned From Am I Making You Uncomfortable? Also on HuffPost
7
Media and advertising were grappling with disruption long before the global pandemic. Between the decline of TV and the rise of streaming, the death of cookies and the stress of ad agencies, transformation in these sectors is linked to its very survival.
2
Stephanie Winston Wolkoff published "Melania and Me: The Rise and Fall of my Friendship with the First Lady" on September 1.
2
Stephanie Winston Wolkoff made the claim to CNN on Wednesday. The First Lady's office said at the time there was no meaning behind the jacket.
1
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have announced they’ve signed a new deal with Netflix, which will see them producing new content for the streaming giant.The New York Times reported on Wednesday that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex will oversee new “documentaries, docu-series, feature films, scripted shows and children’s programming”, which will debut exclusively on Netflix.In a statement, the couple said: “Our focus will be on creating content that informs but also gives hope.“As new parents, making inspirational family programming is also important to us.”They also said that they were specifically hoping to help “share impactful content that unlocks action”, thanks to Netflix’s global platform.Netflix’s Ted Sarandos said: “We’re incredibly proud they have chosen Netflix as their creative home and are excited about telling stories with them that can help build resilience and increase understanding for audiences everywhere.”Barack and Michelle Obama previously landed a similar deal with Netflix in 2018. The Obamas’ production company, Higher Ground Production, has gone on to release the Oscar-nominated film American Factory, as well as documentaries Crip Camp and Becoming, the latter of which served as a companion piece to the former first lady’s autobiography.It was first reported that Netflix had been hoping to secure a deal with Harry and Meghan back in January, shortly after they announced their intention to take a step back from their royal duties.Earlier this year, Meghan lent her voice to the Disney+ original film Elephant, with reports claiming earlier this year that she narrated the nature documentary in exchange for a donation to the charity Elephants Without Borders.MORE NETFLIX NEWS: The Crown Series 4 Trailer Teases Arrivals Of Margaret Thatcher And Princess Diana The Crown Creator Clears Up Speculation About Meghan Markle And Prince Andrew Being Depicted In Final Series Michaela Coel Explains Why She Turned Down Netflix's $1 Million Offer For I May Destroy You
5
More

Top