Summary - A new market study, Global Luxury E-tailing Market Analysis 2015-2019 and Forecast 2020-2025 ” has been featured on WiseGuyReports.The global Luxury E-tailing market size is estimated at xxx million USD with a CAGR xx% from 2015-2019 and is expected to reach xxx Million USD in 2020 with a CAGR xx% from 2020 to 2025.The report begins from overview of Industry Chain structure, and describes industry environment, then analyses market size and forecast of Luxury E-tailing by product, region and application, in addition, this report introduces market competition situation among the vendors and company profile, besides, market price analysis and value chain features are covered in this report.ALSO READ: https://www.einpresswire.com/article/521301606/luxury-e-tailing-market-global-industry-analysis-size-share-growth-trends-and-forecast-2020-2025Product Type Coverage (Market Size & Forecast, Major Company of Product Type etc.): Shoes Handbags & Wallets Clothing Jewelry Watches Company Coverage (Company Profile, Sales Revenue, Price, Gross Margin, Main Products etc.): Neiman Marcus Net-A-Porter Nordstrom Ralph Lauren Saks Fifth Avenue Amara Barneys Charms and Chain DellOglio Exclusively.com Harrods Hudson Bay Luisa-Via-Roma Montaigne Market Yoox Application Coverage (Market Size & Forecast, Different Demand Market by Region, Main Consumer Profile etc.): < 25 yrs 25-40 yrs 41-60 yrs >60 yrs Region Coverage (Regional Production, Demand & Forecast by Countries etc.Asia-Pacific (China, India, Japan, Southeast Asia etc.)
Summary - A new market study, titled “Global Luxury E-tailing Market Analysis 2015-2019 and Forecast 2020-2025 ” has been featured on WiseGuyReports.The global Luxury E-tailing market size is estimated at xxx million USD with a CAGR xx% from 2015-2019 and is expected to reach xxx Million USD in 2020 with a CAGR xx% from 2020 to 2025.The report begins from overview of Industry Chain structure, and describes industry environment, then analyses market size and forecast of Luxury E-tailing by product, region and application, in addition, this report introduces market competition situation among the vendors and company profile, besides, market price analysis and value chain features are covered in this report.ALSO READ: https://www.einpresswire.com/article/521301606/luxury-e-tailing-market-global-industry-analysis-size-share-growth-trends-and-forecast-2020-2025Product Type Coverage (Market Size & Forecast, Major Company of Product Type etc.): Shoes Handbags & Wallets Clothing Jewelry Watches Company Coverage (Company Profile, Sales Revenue, Price, Gross Margin, Main Products etc.): Neiman Marcus Net-A-Porter Nordstrom Ralph Lauren Saks Fifth Avenue Amara Barneys Charms and Chain DellOglio Exclusively.com Harrods Hudson Bay Luisa-Via-Roma Montaigne Market Yoox Application Coverage (Market Size & Forecast, Different Demand Market by Region, Main Consumer Profile etc.): < 25 yrs 25-40 yrs 41-60 yrs >60 yrs Region Coverage (Regional Production, Demand & Forecast by Countries etc.
Summary - A new market study, titled “Global Luxury E-tailing Market Analysis 2015-2019 and Forecast 2020-2025 ” has been featured on WiseGuyReports.The global Luxury E-tailing market size is estimated at xxx million USD with a CAGR xx% from 2015-2019 and is expected to reach xxx Million USD in 2020 with a CAGR xx% from 2020 to 2025.The report begins from overview of Industry Chain structure, and describes industry environment, then analyses market size and forecast of Luxury E-tailing by product, region and application, in addition, this report introduces market competition situation among the vendors and company profile, besides, market price analysis and value chain features are covered in this report.ALSO READ: https://www.einpresswire.com/article/521301606/luxury-e-tailing-market-global-industry-analysis-size-share-growth-trends-and-forecast-2020-2025Product Type Coverage (Market Size & Forecast, Major Company of Product Type etc.): Shoes Handbags & Wallets Clothing Jewelry Watches Company Coverage (Company Profile, Sales Revenue, Price, Gross Margin, Main Products etc.): Neiman Marcus Net-A-Porter Nordstrom Ralph Lauren Saks Fifth Avenue Amara Barneys Charms and Chain DellOglio Exclusively.com Harrods Hudson Bay Luisa-Via-Roma Montaigne Market Yoox Application Coverage (Market Size & Forecast, Different Demand Market by Region, Main Consumer Profile etc.): < 25 yrs 25-40 yrs 41-60 yrs >60 yrs Region Coverage (Regional Production, Demand & Forecast by Countries etc.
Summary - A new market study, titled “ Global Luxury E-tailing Market Size, Status and Forecast 2020-2026” has been featured on WiseGuyReports.Luxury E-tailing market is segmented by Type, and by Application.Players, stakeholders, and other participants in the global Luxury E-tailing market will be able to gain the upper hand as they use the report as a powerful resource.The segmental analysis focuses on revenue and forecast by Type and by Application in terms of revenue and forecast for the period 2015-2026.Also Read:http://www.marketwatch.com/story/luxury-e-tailing-market-2020-global-industry-share-size-key-growth-drivers-trends-segments-emerging-technologies-opportunity-and-forecast-2020-to-2026-2020-08-06The key players covered in this studyNeiman MarcusNet-A-PorterNordstromRalph LaurenSaks Fifth AvenueAmaraBarneysCharms And ChainDellOglioExclusivelyHarrodsMarket segment by Type, the product can be split intoPersonal Luxury GoodsLuxury Food And WineLuxury Home AccessoriesMarket segment by Application, split intoResidentialCommercialMarket segment by Regions/Countries, this report coversNorth AmericaEuropeChinaJapanSoutheast AsiaIndiaCentral & South AmericaFOR MORE DETAILS: https://www.wiseguyreports.com/reports/5659559-global-luxury-e-tailing-market-size-status-and-forecast-2020-2026About Us:Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Research Consultants Pvt.Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe.Contact Us: NORAH TRENT                                                      [email protected]: +162-825-80070 (US)                          Ph: +44 2035002763 (UK)      
Get physical, social, and digital. It's time to integrate.
Summary - A new market study, titled “Global Luxury E-tailing Market Insights and Forecast to 2026”has been featured on WiseGuyReports.Luxury E-tailing market is segmented by Type, and by Application.Players, stakeholders, and other participants in the global Luxury E-tailing market will be able to gain the upper hand as they use the report as a powerful resource.The segmental analysis focuses on revenue and forecast by Type and by Application in terms of revenue and forecast for the period 2015-2026.Also Read: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/luxury-e-tailing-market-2020-global-industry-share-size-key-growth-drivers-trends-segments-emerging-technologies-opportunity-and-forecast-2020-to-2026-2020-08-06 The key players covered in this studyNeiman MarcusNet-A-PorterNordstromRalph LaurenSaks Fifth AvenueAmaraBarneysCharms And ChainDellOglioExclusivelyHarrods Market segment by Type, the product can be split intoPersonal Luxury GoodsLuxury Food And WineLuxury Home AccessoriesMarket segment by Application, split intoResidentialCommercial Market segment by Regions/Countries, this report coversNorth AmericaEuropeChinaJapanSoutheast AsiaIndiaCentral & South AmericaFOR MORE DETAILS:  https://www.wiseguyreports.com/reports/5659559-global-luxury-e-tailing-market-size-status-and-forecast-2020-2026About Us: Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Research Consultants Pvt.Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe.Contact Us: NORAH TRENT                                                     [email protected]      Ph: +162-825-80070 (US)                         Ph: +44 203 500 2763 (UK)      
Mass closings of popular stores like Zara and Victoria's Secret mean you'll see less of these brands in the future.
Don't hold onto a gift card for a retailer that has filed for bankruptcy. It's impossible to know what the future holds.
Neiman Marcus, JCPenney, and California Pizza Kitchen are among those that have filed for bankruptcy so far this year.
Amazon, Walmart, and Target are thriving while dozens of other retailers are closing stores and filing for bankruptcy. All three companies have benefitted from the closures of "non-essential" stores, as well as spikes in consumer spending on groceries and household goods.  Amazon, Walmart, and Target have also been well positioned to capture a surge in spending online, following years of massive investments in their e-commerce operations. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The pandemic is fueling record growth at Amazon, Walmart, and Target, and solidifying their reign over America's retail landscape for years to come. All three retailers reported blowout sales in the second quarter. Walmart's digital sales nearly doubled from a year earlier and Target's nearly tripled. The companies' same-store sales climbed 9% and 10.9%, respectively. Amazon's overall sales grew 40% in the quarter. The companies' strong performance comes against a backdrop of widespread pain and unprecedented upheaval in the US retail industry. More than a dozen major retailers have filed for bankruptcy so far in 2020, including J. Crew, Neiman Marcus, JCPenney, Brooks Brothers, and Tailored Brands, which owns Men's Wearhouse and Jos. A. Bank. Retailers have also announced plans to close more than 6,300 stores this year. Many of the retailers that are feeling the most pain right now were already struggling before the pandemic. The virus has only quickened their demise by carrying forward years of projected declines. Meanwhile, America's big-box titans are thriving amid the global health crisis. As thousands of stores shut down across the country at the start of the pandemic, Amazon, Walmart, and Target were among the retailers deemed "essential" and therefore able to continue operating. This means they benefitted from several weeks of big stock-up trips, as consumers stockpiled paper goods, food, cleaning products, and more. Even as "non-essential" stores reopened, big-box retailers continued to dominate.  At this point, shoppers continued to stock up on food because they were still eating more meals at home. They also started spending on goods for entertaining and working at home, such as bicycles, puzzles, home-office supplies, patio furniture, and other household items. A record share of consumer spending shifted online, as well, as people tried to avoid going into stores at all. Moody's Analytics REIS, a commercial real estate-focused arm of Moody's Analytics, estimates that the share of e-commerce spending relative to total retail sales increased from 11.4% at the end of 2019 to a historic 16.4% in the months of March and April alone. Amazon, Walmart, and Target were all best positioned to reap the benefits of this shift. These companies have been focused for years on building out massive e-commerce networks capable of shipping hundreds of thousands of products to consumers quickly, cheaply, and efficiently.  All three companies also had established curbside pickup from stores, which has become massively popular during the pandemic.  Target, for example, said in-store pickup of online orders grew 60% in the second quarter, and drive-up pickup — in which Target employees deliver orders to customers' cars in a store parking lot — surged more than 700%.  When consumers have chosen to visit stores, they appear to be consolidating their trips to reduce risk of exposure to the virus. This has made big-box stores — which carry groceries along with a huge selection of general merchandise — highly convenient. Amid all this, many consumers recently received government stimulus funds and some had extra money from canceled vacations, which boosted retail spending overall, according to the chief executives of Walmart and Target.  Taken together, these factors have helped make America's biggest retailers more powerful than ever, and poised to win the future of retail in the US.SEE ALSO: Demand for warehouse space is surging as historic online spending exposes a major weakness Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
IBM is pushing forward with its search for a huge new Manhattan office where it would consolidate several locations, sources told Business Insider.  The firm has narrowed its search to about a half dozen buildings. The progress shows that not all tenants have soured on the workplace, even as the coronavirus has prompted some occupiers to question whether they will need as much space going forward. The tech sector has been a robust taker of office space through the pandemic.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. IBM is forging ahead with its search for a huge Manhattan office where it will consolidate several locations it occupies in the city, five sources with direct knowledge of the computing giant's plans said. The $110 billion public company has narrowed its options to roughly half a dozen buildings, these sources said. Among the spaces IBM is said to be considering is a deal to anchor a potential redevelopment of the office property One Madison Avenue. IBM is seeking between 450,000 and 500,000 square feet and has hired the real estate services firm Cushman & Wakefield to help it evaluate and procure the space. "IBM continually looks at our real estate to ensure it services the needs of IBMers and how we serve our clients," a spokesman for IBM said in a statement, declining to provide further information about the status of the firm's plans.  The company's search highlights how some tenants, especially in relatively robust sectors of the economy such as technology, have persevered in making real-estate decisions despite the coronavirus crisis, which has caused commercial real-estate sales and leasing to otherwise plummet. Read More: WeWork is embracing big brokerage firms to help it fill space it gobbled up in NYC and Los Angeles. It's a key pivot for the coworking giant as leasing demand slows. Some tech firms are still seen pushing ahead with leases Facebook is said to be nearing an agreement to lease over 700,000 square feet at the Farley Building on Manhattan's West Side. Those negotiations have captivated the city's real estate industry, which views the transaction as a measure of health for the office market and a signal whether large companies remain committed to maintaining a physical footprint as the pandemic has thrust the future utility of the workplace into question. The video sharing site TikTok meanwhile, recently signed on to lease over 200,000 square feet at 151 West 42nd Street in Times Square. "Years go into the decision-making process of where to locate a company, lease space, and grow," said Nelson Mils, the president and CEO of Columbia Property Trust, which owns and operates nearly 3 million square feet of space in the city and also owns buildings in other major markets such as San Francisco, Boston, and Washington DC. "Successful companies spend a lot of time and energy making these decisions and Covid is just one more aspect of the process." Mills pointed out that Columbia recently signed a roughly 35,000 square foot lease with Twitch Prime, a streaming video gaming service owned by Amazon, which is taking two floors at 315 Park Avenue South. "These tech and media businesses are doing quite well," Mills said. "I don't think anyone we're talking to right now is devaluing the importance of the office to their future and the success of their culture and business." The coronavirus has dealt a considerable blow to the office market both in the city and nationally. Just 1.3 million square feet of space was leased in Manhattan in May and June, almost half of the 2.5 million square feet that was leased in June 2019 alone, according to data from CBRE. So far, about 8.3 million square feet has been leased in Manhattan this year, down from almost 15 million square feet at the same point a year ago, CBRE reported. The large office provider WeWork is awash in so much space, it revealed to Business Insider that it is tapping large real-estate brokerage companies such as CBRE and JLL for the first time to help it fill large holes in its portfolio. IBM, itself, seemed to pull back on its office presence, dropping a 70,000 square foot space it occupied in Manhattan with WeWork. Columbia releases its earnings on Thursday, but peers in the business have been bruised by the crisis. Last week, SL Green released second-quarter financial information that showed its earnings per share dropped to 74 cents, down 60% from the same period a year ago. Read more: IBM is ditching a big WeWork office in NYC, revealing the risks of the popular flex-space model as the pandemic prompts Blue Chip companies to rethink real estate Long-term remote work plans have loomed over office markets Large tenants have uncoupled their operations from the workplace, raising anxieties among landlords when tenants will return and if the pandemic could lead to a long term downsizing and deprioritization of physical office space. Google, for instance, announced Monday that it would allow employees to work from home until next summer. Twitter, which has its NYC headquarters in a building owned by Columbia on West 17th Street, told its workers earlier in the virus crisis that they are free to work from home indefinitely. Mills said he believes that despite that edict from Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, the company has conveyed it will maintain an office presence. "We had conversations with them and there is no suggestion that they will reduce their footprint," Mills said. "Will working from home be a lasting thing? It could happen. But we have talked about it many times that the drivers that made office space a necessary for creativity and culture for firms like Google, Facebook, Apple and Twitter all still exist." Read more: Neiman Marcus' shocking exit from glitzy Hudson Yards strikes a huge blow to the $25 billion project. The departure could unravel one of the most expensive mega-malls in US history. Co-living is the real-estate industry's big bet on dorm-like housing for young professionals. Here's why players like Nuveen and Cushman & Wakefield remain bullish even during the pandemic. Real estate developers are building costly cold storage space before they even have tenants. They're betting the risky move could be a winning investment as grocery delivery booms. Have a tip? Contact Daniel Geiger at [email protected] or via encrypted messaging app Signal at +1 (646) 352-2884, or Twitter DM at @dangeiger79. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. SEE ALSO: IBM is ditching a big WeWork office in NYC, revealing the risks of the popular flex-space model as the pandemic prompts Blue Chip companies to rethink real estate SEE ALSO: A quarter of NYC office leases went to tech firms in 2019. Now, the fate of a blockbuster Facebook deal is make-or-break for the city — and a case study for the future of commercial real estate. SEE ALSO: Major tenants are delaying big leases in NYC as they re-think their office space needs for the post-coronavirus world Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
Hello everyone! Welcome to this weekly roundup of Business Insider stories from executive editor Matt Turner. Please subscribe to Business Insider here to get this newsletter in your inbox every Sunday. Hello! The financial-services industry is changing at a rapid clip, with fintechs addressing people's needs among the big winners in the wake of the coronavirus, as Dan DeFrancesco and Shannen Balogh reported this week. For example:  Robinhood, which has seen massive growth as market volatility continues, is now valued at $8.3 billion after its most recent funding round in May. Meanwhile, other personal finance apps like Chime and Stash have also seen record sign-up numbers recently.  With that in mind, Dan and Shannen polled 27 investors to discover the fintechs that are on the cusp of breaking out. While investors could pitch companies both inside and out of their portfolio, the caveat was that none could have surpassed a Series B raise. The response was impressive, with 60 fintechs nominated. Overall, investors seem more bullish on the future of startups catering to businesses, not consumers, as more than 63% of the selections were B2B. You can read both lists here: Investors say these 38 fintechs are the next generation of breakout B2B stars, following in the footsteps of Stripe and Plaid 22 fintechs that VCs and big investors say are on the brink of becoming household names Speaking of fintech investors, Megan Hernbroth profiled 25 young investors in the space, highlighting what drew them to fintech and what they think are the biggest opportunities.  The investors also shared some tips on how to snag a role in their competitive field. You can read both stories here: These 25 investors are hunting for the next big fintech unicorn. Here's what founders should know before pitching them. The latest class of successful young fintech investors reveals how to land a job in the notoriously exclusive field Trump's most important 2016 donor is sitting out 2020 Dave Levinthal reports: Hedge fund billionaire Robert Mercer and his daughter Rebekah ranked among President Donald Trump's most influential backers in 2016. But they've all but abandoned the embattled president and aren't likely to help him in the home stretch for 2020, five people who know the media-averse Mercers tell Insider. "They're 100, 100, 100% out," an associate of Rebekah Mercer said. You can read that story in full here: Trump's most important 2016 donor is sitting out 2020 In other politics news: Tom LoBianco had the inside story on Jared Kushner's call to the CEOs of AT&T, Verizon, & T-Mobile after the Trump campaign was blocked from sending text messages to people who hadn't signed up for them. Dave reported that Republican Party officials hid COVID-19 mask purchases by labeling them "building maintenance" in federal disclosures. And Elvina Nawaguna reported that Presidential inaugurations are prime time for DC schmoozing. But the coronavirus pandemic might mean no fancy balls, parades or big swampy parties come January 2021. The transformation of the real estate business We've written at length in recent months about the future of the office, as the coronavirus pandemic forces employers to rethink their needs and landlords to reimagine their model. This week: Dan Geiger reported that 20% of WeWork's New York space is sitting empty. He took a look at key vacancies the city's biggest office tenant is trying to fill. Alex Nicoll and Rebecca Ungarino reported that Wells Fargo is ditching a 750-person WeWork space, while Citi inked a deal with the flex-office giant far from a big city. They took a look at how financial firms are retooling their real estate. Reed Alexander reported that while Wall Street is starting to return to the office, not everyone is heading back. He took a look at which finance jobs are the most likely to remain virtual. In related news, the rapid shift to ecommerce that's been accelerated by COVID 19 is putting severe pressure on malls and placing fresh emphasis on warehouse space.  Dan reported that Neiman Marcus' shocking exit from glitzy Hudson Yards strikes a huge blow to the $25 billion project. The departure could unravel one of the most expensive mega-malls in US history. Meanwhile, the $98 billion cold-storage sector is at a tipping point, per Dan and Alex. Investors are piling in as online grocery deliveries surge. And logistics startup Bond has teamed up with SoftBank-backed REEF Technology to bring nano-warehouses to parking lots across the US. Alex reported on how they're building the distribution hubs of the future. Separately, I want to highlight a couple of things before I go: We're seeking nominations for the 2020 edition of our annual list of Rising Stars of Wall Street. Here's how to apply. We're speaking with YouTube and Instagram influencers with millions of followers about how they're adapting their businesses during the pandemic and earning 6-figure incomes. Sign up for the digital live event on August 5 here.  Below are headlines on some of the stories you might have missed from the past week. — Matt Inside the rise of Ram Sundaram, the leader of a secretive Goldman Sachs desk that's minting billions by designing some of the bank's most imaginative — and controversial — trades Top management-consulting salaries, revealed: How much Bain, BCG, and McKinsey consultants make, from entry level through partner roles Bernstein says buy these 13 dividend-rich stocks built to capitalize on a trend not seen in 65 years 19 media startups that top VCs say are poised to take off in 2020, as the pandemic reshapes the industry Insiders at Complex Networks said the company was built on Black culture but that the sales team 'whitewashed' advertising deals for brands, replacing Black people with white people in pitch decks In March, Trump announced Google would build a coronavirus testing tool. Some employees working on it describe exhausting conditions, stress, and tears as they work around-the-clock to pull it off. Leaked documents reveal Exxon changed its employee-ranking system amid the coronavirus pandemic, putting more workers at risk of getting cut POWER LIST: Here are the 18 most outstanding women transforming the sneaker industry today, from designers to influencers Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What it's like inside North Korea's controversial restaurant chain
  Welcome to Wall Street Insider, where we take you behind the scenes of the finance team's biggest scoops and deep dives from the past week.  If you aren't yet a subscriber to Wall Street Insider, you can sign up here. Goldman Sachs exec Ram Sundaram has solidified his position as a senior leader in the firm's mighty markets division. Sundaram, named sole head of the currencies and emerging-markets team last month, is also responsible for a structured credit group known for much of its history as Principal Funding and Investments. Dakin Campbell took a look at why the elevation of Sundaram — and what some see as his eat-what-you-kill Wall Street mentality — came as somewhat of a surprise to insiders who see Goldman marketing itself as a kinder, gentler investment bank.  You can read the full story here:  Inside the rise of Ram Sundaram, the leader of a secretive Goldman Sachs desk that's minting billions by designing some of the bank's most imaginative — and controversial — trades.  Alex Morrell was breaking news left and right on trader moves this week. A senior credit-trading exec Wells Fargo hired just one year ago is out. And Bank of America shook up its global equities division — twice. As part of a slew of changes, the firm elevated Soofian Zuberi to cohead the group alongside Fabrizio Gallo, the division's sole leader since 2011. Take a look at our latest org chart for Bank of America's equities division. Over at Deutsche Bank, plenty of traders have been saying their goodbyes. That includes the bank's head of investment-grade credit trading, who left just this week. The departure adds to a long list of exits in the firm's credit-trading unit this year. Here's what's been driving a broader exodus at Deutsche Bank's vaunted credit desk, where even rock stars are feeling a pay squeeze.  Buy now, pay later startup Affirm announced this week that it will power Shopify's Shop Pay Installments, which is set to launch later this year. The deal brings together two of the hottest e-commerce players, and Shannen Balogh explained why it's a big win for both sides. She also mapped out Shopify's power players, and you can see the full list here: Meet 12 key execs driving Shopify, an investor darling that's seen its stock price triple since March. More below on the hottest B2B and B2C fintechs, Neiman Marcus' exit from Hudson Yards, the empty space WeWork is marketing in New York, and a roundup of top credit execs and new hires at Apollo.  Enjoy the weekend, Meredith  We're seeking nominations for the 2020 Rising Stars of Wall Street  Business Insider is putting together a power list of young talent on Wall Street in 2020. We want to hear from you on the people who have been rising the ranks and standing out in the worlds of investment banking, investing, and sales and trading.  You can submit your ideas through this form by August 13.  WeWork's long list of empty space WeWork is awash in vacancy in its biggest city, Dan Geiger reported. And the coworking giant's availability rate in New York, which includes spaces that are empty or will be in the coming months, far exceeds that of the overall market. Read the full story here:  20% of WeWork's New York space is sitting empty. Here's a look at key vacancies the city's biggest office tenant is trying to fill. Apollo power players Apollo Global Management has been quietly building out its credit team as the pandemic rages on and investors await a flurry of deal activity. Recent hires have come from Bank of America and PointState Capital, and Casey Sullivan also learned about several others in the works. He took a look at Apollo's credit lineup, including senior execs who will be pulling the strings behind lending deals, and those who Apollo has tapped to help bring its credit investments to the next level.  Read the full story here:  13 Apollo execs, rising stars, and new hires who are propelling the firm's massive push into credit investments 60 fintechs set to take off in 2020 The world of fintech moves fast, with no-name startups turning into fintech darlings with billion-dollar valuations seemingly overnight. Dan DeFrancesco and Shannen Balogh polled 27 fintech investors to find out which startups are on the cusp of breaking out. The submissions were wide-ranging, touching on everything from personal finance to bill pay to data management. You can see the list of B2Bs here:  Investors say these 38 fintechs are the next generation of breakout B2B stars, following in the footsteps of Stripe and Plaid And a roundup of hot consumer-facing fintechs here: 22 fintechs that VCs and big investors say are on the brink of becoming household names Everybody's a macro trader now At the beginning of the pandemic, the market fell with each new update on infection numbers — and alternative data firms were quick to roll out new indices and markers to track the fallout.  But with the S&P 500 almost back at its February highs, hedge funds trying to make sense of it all have had to reimagine the way they use their alt data. And as Bradley Saacks explains, just about every money manager is thinking big picture and looking more like a macro investor. Read the full story here:  Hedge funds are overhauling the way they use alt data as even quants are being forced to think like macro investors Neiman Marcus exits Hudson Yards in Manhattan Neiman Marcus' surprise exit from the one-million-square-foot mall at the Hudson Yards not only knocks out the glitzy retail project's headline tenant — it could also unravel profits for the remainder of the space. As Dan Geiger reports, developers The Related Companies and Oxford Properties had used Neiman's presence to attract other retailers to the 7-level property known as The Shops at Hudson Yards — and many of those tenants have co-tenancy clauses in their leases.  Read the full story here:  Neiman Marcus' exit from the Hudson Yards strikes a blow to the $25 billion mega-project. Here's how the departure could unravel the 1-million-square-foot mall. Real-estate earnings preview Analysts are predicting one of the most bruising quarters in recent memory for major real-estate firms such as CBRE, Cushman & Wakefield, and JLL, which are scheduled to report earnings in the coming weeks. The companies depend heavily on transactions such as sales and leasing that evaporated as the pandemic stalled the economy. But while it could take years for their earnings to rebound, real-estate services companies have also diversified their revenue since the last recession, which could help guard their bottom lines. Read the full story here:  Wall Street analysts say this earnings season could be a bloodbath for big real-estate firms like CBRE and Cushman & Wakefield, with a Great Recession-sized hit packed into just a few months Careers How to use cold emails to land a gig working on Wall Street, according to a JPMorgan banking analyst turned VC who did it herself Top management-consulting salaries, revealed: How much Bain, BCG, and McKinsey consultants make, from entry level through partner roles Wall Street is starting to return to the office — but not everyone is heading back. Here's which finance jobs are the most likely to remain virtual. Charles Schwab will offer half of its virtual interns full-time jobs in the coming weeks. From what to wear to how to stay organized, a talent exec at the brokerage giant shares ways to impress remotely. One of the most powerful women at Bank of America explained how to defeat racial inequality at work: 'It's one thing to say Lives Matter. It's another thing to say, with clarity, Black Lives Matter.' Law firms like Kirkland & Ellis and Jones Day are delaying their first-year associate classes. Here's everything you need to know. New York's bar exam is cancelled. Here's why calls are mounting for the test to be canned completely. Wealth Management Greg Fleming's $43 billion Rockefeller Capital has aggressively poached advisers from the biggest wealth firms. Here's what execs are planning next. Deals 4 charts map out why private-equity dealmaking and fundraising is poised for a rebound, with more firms on the hunt for deals and execs embracing virtual meetings WeWork rival Knotel just told staff it's looking to raise $100 million as it faces a turbulent office market and a host of unpaid bills Real Estate Logistics startup Bond has teamed up with SoftBank-backed REEF Technology to bring nano-warehouses to parking lots across the US. Here's how they're building the distribution hubs of the future. Wells Fargo is ditching a 750-person WeWork space, while Citi inked a deal with the flex-office giant far from a big city. Here's a look at how financial firms are retooling their real estate. The $98 billion cold-storage sector is at a tipping point, and investors are piling in as online grocery deliveries surge Hedge funds  These 5 slides from a small hedge fund's pitchdeck were at the center of a legal battle with Ray Dalio's Bridgewater — and it shows the lengths the billionaire will go to protect his firm's trade secrets A $400 million activist investor returned 44% in the 2nd quarter — and now it's urging one of the drivers of its performance, airport WiFi provider Boingo, to sell itself Payments The CFO of Visa maps out 2 areas it's investing in beyond cards to keep up with fintechs that are transforming the payments game eBay will manage its own payments now that its 5-year agreement with PayPal has expired, and its head of payments is eyeing $2 billion in new revenue Inside JPMorgan's $500 million bet on healthcare payments: the CEO of InstaMed says it's seeing record sales since being acquired by the Wall Street giant Startups SoftBank-backed fintech Kabbage is making a grab at small businesses disillusioned by big banks' PPP rollout by launching its own checking accounts Compass and Latch investor Corigin Ventures just pledged 15% of its portfolio to Black and LatinX founders in a bid to bring diversity to tech and old-school industries like real estate Read the 24-slide pitch deck that 'data janitor' startup Trifacta used to land $100 million from backers including Google and BMW SEE ALSO: We've been tracking big hires and exits across Wall Street. Here's a look at this year's must-know people moves. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What makes 'Parasite' so shocking is the twist that happens in a 10-minute sequence
Offices, hotels, and malls were emptied by the coronavirus. While some are reopening, the disruption has created a new normal.  Big firms are rethinking office needs — and some commercial real-estate deals are being put on ice as financing dries up.  A surge in e-commerce, meanwhile, is fueling demand for warehouse space from companies like Amazon.  For more stories like this, sign up here for our Wall Street Insider newsletter. The coronavirus threw the real-estate world into disarray, as people emptied out of offices, hotels, and malls and worked from their homes. The disruption is transforming how people and companies finance, operate, and occupy real estate.  Big firms are rethinking office needs — and some commercial real-estate deals are being put on ice as financing dries up. Coworking and flex-office firms are struggling under big rent obligations after years of rapid growth. A surge in e-commerce, meanwhile, is fueling demand for warehouse space as companies look for new ways to reach customers. Here's the latest news on how commercial and residential real estate is being upended, and how experts think these markets will play out in the long run.  Have a tip about layoffs or major changes in this space? Contact this reporter through the secure messaging app Signal at +1 (646) 768-4772 using a non-work phone, email at [email protected], or Twitter DM at @AlexONicoll. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Here's everything we know right now:  Latest news and deals WeWork is looking to fill 2 million square feet of vacancies in New York City, its biggest market. Here's what's sitting empty. Top management consulting salaries, revealed: how much Bain, BCG, and McKinsey consultants make, from entry-level through partner roles WeWork rival Knotel just told staff it's looking to raise $100 million as it faces a turbulent office market and a host of unpaid bills How commercial real-estate giant JLL is revamping its trainee program to help early-career brokers land deals virtually and navigate big disruptions in the market Office-rental startup Knotel bragged it was a nearly profitable anti-WeWork. Now lawsuits are stacking up. 12 insiders reveal what happened to the $400 million Knotel said it raised last year. WeWork is leasing a big new office in Jersey City to house the headquarters of a planned spin-off from pharma giant Merck. Here's how the deal will work, and why it's a big win for the struggling coworking giant. Co-living is the real-estate industry's big bet on dorm-like housing for young professionals. Here's why players like Nuveen and Cushman & Wakefield remain bullish even during the pandemic. Women-focused coworking startup The Wing is almost $270,000 behind on rent and other charges at its Bryant Park location in New York, according to lawsuit The short-term rental market is consolidating in big cities as demand surges in rural areas. Here's how startups like Sonder are taking advantage of the shakeout. A growing group of lenders are looking to unload hundreds of millions of dollars of souring hotel loans. Teams hired to sell the portfolios say it's just the beginning of a surge in activity. A top Americas exec at commercial real-estate giant Cushman & Wakefield is out Billions of dollars of Las Vegas development hang in the balance right now, but the owner of Caesars Palace sees the city's crisis as an opportunity to imagine its next mega-project. Warehouse space is heating up Amazon just signed its largest-ever warehouse lease in NYC. Here's how it's been making deals left and right to grow its massive storage and distribution network. Amazon just signed a lease on a huge NYC warehouse used by one-time rival Jet.com. The e-commerce giant has been gobbling up industrial space as demand for deliveries surges. Warehouses are the new darling of commercial real-estate thanks to a surge in e-commerce, with firms like Macy's and Boeing selling while Amazon snaps space up A surge in grocery deliveries is creating a huge opportunity for industrial real-estate developers. Here's how the coronavirus is transforming retail and warehousing. Office sublease deals adding supply to the market Companies from banks to tech giants are looking to shed huge chunks of office space. Here's a look at 8 key sublease offers — and what they mean for rents in big-city markets. Macy's is slashing the size of its brand-new global headquarters by nearly 40% in another drastic step to cut costs How retail is faring  Commercial real-estate hiring is heating back up. From strategy-focused exec jobs to the red-hot industrial space, 4 recruiters lay out roles they're trying to fill. Brookfield CEO Bruce Flatt lays out how retail and office space can still thrive and why private infrastructure is the next big opportunity Bankrupt Neiman Marcus's $80 million flagship store in the glitzy Hudson Yards mega-mall is now being marketed as office space. It's another black eye for the city's retail market. Burning through cash and nothing coming in: We talked to 7 VC investors about what's keeping them up at night in their proptech portfolios Inside a 'big short' bet against malls: Investors are claiming wins, and a research analyst who said the wagers were misguided is out Lease obligations are 'suffocating' retailers — and a potential court fight over a Victoria's Secret flagship NYC store highlights a wider battle between tenants and landlords State of the commercial real-estate market Lenders are balking at financing mega commercial real-estate deals — and that's leaving buyers for buildings like the Transamerica Pyramid in limbo Big investors poured billions into student housing — thinking it was a recession-proof bet. Then the pandemic emptied campuses and turned that thesis on its head. Facebook is eyeing offices in cities like Dallas, Atlanta, and Denver to act as 'hubs' to support 50% of its workers staying remote — and it's a move that could upend Silicon Valley and NYC real estate Global firms are cutting down on their real-estate footprint as CEOs across industries are considering a permanent switch to remote work Meet the 4 dealmakers driving Blackstone's $325 billion commercial real estate portfolio. They walked us through how they're thinking about opportunities in the downturn. A blockbuster Facebook office deal is a make-or-break moment for the future of commercial real estate. 3 leasing experts lay out the stakes. Neiman Marcus just filed for bankruptcy, and it could mark a major blow to NYC's glitzy Hudson Yards — one of the most expensive mega-malls in US history. Here's why. Inside the drama over control of the iconic Chrysler Building: A real-estate tycoon and a prestigious college are renegotiating a critical $150 million deal The CEO of real estate heavy-hitter Eastdil explains the types of deals that are must-do right now — and warns that a 'de-retailing' trend is set to accelerate The lender to a trendy Brooklyn hotel is looking to offload an $80 million mortgage as the hospitality sector craters — and it's the type of deal distressed-debt investors have been waiting for Real-estate tycoon Aby Rosen is abandoning $600 million worth of acquisitions as the coronavirus slams New York City's multibillion-dollar sales market Major tenants are delaying big leases in NYC as they re-think their office space needs for the post-coronavirus world Blackstone bet big on 4 huge Las Vegas casinos. Then the coronavirus brought Sin City to a halt, right as the PE giant was trying to unload one of its multi-billion-dollar jewels. 7 charts show how the coronavirus could clobber real estate, from retail vacancies of nearly 15% to plunging office rents in Texas cities Coworking and short-term rentals WeWork is ditching a major Manhattan office it hasn't even moved into yet — and it's the first big step in a turnaround that's put its entire real-estate portfolio under review Vacancy rates are soaring above 15% in Washington DC's normally recession-proof office market. Here's how industry players think this downturn will shape up — and why some are still optimistic. Leaked financials from WeWork rival Knotel show huge pre-pandemic losses and a shrinking cash pile. It's a grim sign for the flex-office space. After 2 layoff rounds, a valuation nosedive, and chaotic landlord negotiations, Airbnb-backed Zeus Living is shifting its business model. Here's how the corporate-housing startup is moving forward. WeWork's US head of real estate is leaving the coworking giant as the firm works through a major turnaround attempt WeWork is rolling out global layoffs over Zoom and has kicked off talks to slash jobs in the UK as the coworking giant struggles to cope with coronavirus fallout IBM is ditching a big WeWork office it has been renting in NYC — showing risks for the flex-space model as the pandemic prompts big companies to rethink real-estate needs Knotel and insurance startup Rhino didn't disclose its CEOs were brothers when it struck a complex financial deal. Now a key partner could be on the hook as Knotel scrambles to pay bills, slashes staff, and plans to shed portions of its portfolio. WeWork's revenue growth rate was cut in half in Q1, as the company burned through nearly $500 million in 'free cash outflow' As WeWork and flex-space rivals stumble, 18 million square feet of space in NYC is at risk. Here's what that means for the real-estate market. Airbnb and RXR Realty are scrapping a partnership at Rockefeller Center that the home-sharing giant had touted as a '21st-century hospitality model' Airbnb-backed corporate housing startup Zeus Living is asking landlords to renegotiate their leases and withholding April and May rent until they sign Knotel is scrambling to pay millions in bills that started stacking up before the coronavirus hit, and hasn't paid April rent at some locations Leaked documents from Knotel show the WeWork competitor struggled to hit financial targets well before the coronavirus hit 'This is the day of reckoning' for companies like WeWork. 10 real-estate insiders lay out the future of flex-offices, and how employers are preparing now. Hospitality startup Sonder is pushing ahead with plans to open its largest NYC apartment hotel yet as coronavirus cripples the travel industry The future of real estate WeWork is bringing corporate staff back to New York offices in 3 waves as the city enters the next stage of reopening. Here are the details the coworking giant just gave workers. Home-financing startup EasyKnock just raised $20 million. Its CEO lays out plans for new launches including a marketplace to match investors with homeowners looking for equity. Construction firms that get tech right could see Silicon Valley-like valuations. Here's how an old-school industry can transform itself. Silver Lake just added to a string of recent travel bets by leading a $108 million investment in vacation property startup Vacasa Companies need to add contactless-entry tech to safely reopen offices. Here are 7 firms ranging from startups to huge conglomerates that are set for a surge in business. Robots, remote hires, and insourcing: A top UBS exec lays out how the Swiss bank is tackling the future of work and thinking about real-estate needs A smart home startup that raised $41 million from Amazon and Bain just launched an app that lets landlords and residents give remote access for deliveries, guests, and self-guided tours Zillow tapped a former US surgeon general for advice as it restarts its iBuyer business. She laid out how the company will get home-flipping up and running safely. Here's which real-estate tech startups will soar and which will flop in the new normal of how we occupy space, according to 7 top proptech VCs 10 CEOs from Coldwell Banker, JLL, Cushman Wakefield, and more lay out a post-pandemic future of how we'll buy, build, and use real estate The office as we knew it is dead Mandatory temperature-taking is largely seen as a critical way to return workers to offices. But some big NYC landlords are worried about its effectiveness. The future of real estate could be virtual open houses on Facebook. Coldwell Banker's CEO explains why the in-person industry needs to embrace going digital. 'We should be prepared for a new normal': 3 real estate experts on how the coronavirus is transforming offices and accelerating the rise of industrial property What to expect when you're back in the office: 7 real-estate experts break down what the transition will look like, and why the workplace may never be the same Virtual tours are being hyped as a way for commercial real estate giants like CBRE and JLL to keep deals flowing. Here's a look at how they work — and what factors they can't replace. Real-estate services giant JLL explains how the coronavirus could usher in a permanent 'paradigm shift' towards more remote work SEE ALSO: The ultimate guide to Wall Street's summer internships: Here's how they'll go virtual, and how to impress remotely SEE ALSO: POWER PLAYERS: Meet the bankers, traders, investors, and lawyers seeing huge opportunities in a wave of corporate distress and bankruptcies Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
A new market study, titled “Global Luxury E-tailing Market - Growth Drivers, Opportunities and Forecast Analysis to 2025” has been featured on WiseGuyReports.Luxury e-tailing involves the sales of luxury items from a vendor or retailer to a customer using the online medium.According to the report, growth in the global luxury e-tailing market is mainly driven by the rise in Internet technologies.In 2018, the global Luxury E-tailing market size was xx million US$ and it is expected to reach xx million US$ by the end of 2025, with a CAGR of xx% during 2019-2025.This report focuses on the global Luxury E-tailing status, future forecast, growth opportunity, key market and key players.The study objectives are to present the Luxury E-tailing development in United States, Europe and China.Read also: https://www.einpresswire.com/article/476486829/global-luxury-e-tailing-market-2019-share-trend-segmentation-and-forecast-to-2025 The key players covered in this studyNeiman MarcusNet-A-PorterNordstromRalph LaurenSaks Fifth AvenueAmaraBarneysCharms And ChainDellOglioExclusivelyHarrods Market segment by Type, the product can be split intoPersonal Luxury GoodsLuxury Food And WineLuxury Home Accessories Market segment by Application, split intoResidentialCommercial Market segment by Regions/Countries, this report coversUnited StatesEuropeChinaJapanSoutheast AsiaIndiaCentral & South America The study objectives of this report are:To analyze global Luxury E-tailing status, future forecast, growth opportunity, key market and key players.To present the Luxury E-tailing development in United States, Europe and China.To strategically profile the key players and comprehensively analyze their development plan and strategies.To define, describe and forecast the market by product type, market and key regions.In this study, the years considered to estimate the market size of Luxury E-tailing are as follows:History Year: 2014-2018Base Year: 2018Estimated Year: 2019Forecast Year 2019 to 2025For the data information by region, company, type and application, 2018 is considered as the base year.Whenever data information was unavailable for the base year, the prior year has been considered.FOR MORE DETAILS: https://www.wiseguyreports.com/reports/3710684-global-luxury-e-tailing-market-size-status-and-forecast-2019-2025About Us:Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Research Consultants Pvt.
Visual search uses real-world images (screenshots, Internet images, or photographs) as the stimuli for online searches.Modern visual search technology uses AI (artificial intelligence) to understand the content and context of these images and return a list of related results.It has a host of applications in the eCommerce industry, particularly for fashion and home decor retailers.Visual search allows retailers to suggest thematically or stylistically related items to shoppers in a way they would struggle to do using a text query alone.Pinterest, Google, and Amazon are the main visual search engines today.Microsoft has also developed impressive computer vision capabilities for its Bing search engine.A host of retailers including ASOS, Wayfair, Neiman Marcus, Argos, and IKEA have all built proprietary visual search tools.You can read in detail all about Visual Search here. 
Trước đây, khi nhắc đến những thương hiệu giày thể thao nổi tiếng, người ta sẽ nhanh chóng nêu bật các cái tên tiêu biểu như Adidas, Nike, Puma,... Tuy nhiên, vị thế của những ông lớn này đang bị lung lay khi có nhiều hãng thời trang cao cấp cũng lấn sân vào lĩnh vực này.Đơn cử đầu tiên phải nhắc đến chính là GUCCI.Không làm người tiêu dùng thất vọng, những đôi giày GUCCI đình đám với thiết kế cực kỳ tối giản, nhưng lại toát lên vẻ đẹp sang chảnh khó tìm ở bất kỳ dòng giày nào hiện nay.Được xem là một trong những thương hiệu thời trang đi đầu trên toàn cầu.giày gucci nam Gucci vinh dự khi xếp ở vị trí 46 “TOP 100 sản phẩm” trong bảng xếp hạng hàng năm.Ngoài những mẫu túi Dionysus và Sylvie đắt tiền thì hãng còn sản xuất ra nhiều mẫu giày Gucci nam và nữ cũng không kém phần sang trọng, hút mắt.Nếu như những chiếc túi và trang phục Gucci có khá “chát” thì ngược lại những mẫu giày của hãng lại có giá rất phải chăng, được người tiêu dùng săn đón nồng nhiệt.Bạn có thể bắt gặp rất nhiều ngôi sao lớn cho đến người bình thường diện “ẻm” ra đường.Giải mã lý do về “màn lấn sân” của GucciXu hướng thời trang luôn không ngừng thay đổi.
Abraham & Straus was consolidated with Macy's and Strawbridge & Clothier briefly took its place at The Court.Quickly right after, Could acquired Strawbridge & Clothier, rebranded it as basically Strawbridge's, and merged it with Hecht's Philadelphia operations.They are valid towards purchases in all food and beverage outlets on the property and the Valley Shop and toward resort membership rewards.Unused points expire following 12 months if the player remains active, but soon after just six months if there is no activity.The former Strawbridge's at The Court was converted into The Pavilion.The eastern portion of the mall (initially recognized as the Court) has two anchor stores, Macy's and Bloomingdale's.Shops in this section consist of a double-level Urban Outfitters, Old Navy, and The Cheesecake Factory.Nonetheless, the surrounding neighborhood has been largely supportive of the casino.
Uber these days printed it was once launching two new offerings for customers that in reality flip Uber‘s drivers into object couriers — and in each cases, it appears the intent is to assist drivers who are struggling thanks to the coronavirus.With Uber Direct, drivers can now supply gadgets from non-food shops — it’s in reality an enlargement of UberEat’s growth into groceries.Uber gives as an instance pet meals and over-the-counter pharmaceuticals, and I can imagine numerous different use instances of matters you choose however may no longer always reflect on consideration on well worth leaving the residence for.Direct may be recommended to sure companies that aren’t seeing a lot of foot visitors proper now due to the majority of clients selecting to remain at domestic — actually, the first aspect that springs to thinking is workplace supplies, in my case.Since I work from home, I purchase a lot of my very own workplace supplies, and given that Amazon is now awesome deliveries on non-essential goods, a Direct buy would likely get right here greater quickly.Also, a number of retail shops are projected to shut thanks to COVID-19 — Neiman Marcus is already submitting for financial ruin — so this may assist maintain some above water.Uber Connect is extra of a short-distance courier service, with which customers can ship applications to household and buddies with same-day delivery.Uber is aware of precisely who the target audience is for this too, announcing of it: “Whether it’s a care package, a board game, or an more roll of much-needed lavatory paper, you can ship it with the aid of inquiring for “Uber Connect” in the Uber app.” I don’t understand about you, however I’ve viewed a veritable black market spring up in my regional of pals leaving much-needed objects on every other’s porches, so I can definitely see this being useful.According to the press release, this is phase of Uber‘s efforts to locate new possibilities for drivers to have some thing to do whilst ride-hailing is on the decline, announcing it will “do our first-class to grant incomes possibilities for drivers and shipping people.Our intention is for Uber Connect and Uber Direct to assist drivers locate indispensable work today, whilst unlocking new possibilities in the future.”
For the past decades, the mantra of retailers and shopping malls has been experiencing will save us.Give shoppers something they can’t get online—in-person, hands-on, face-to-face.Then came the coronavirus crisis.The strategy of turning stores and malls into social gathering failed in the social distancing scenario when shoppers are told that the safest thing they can do is stay in the homes.Impact of COVID-19 on Brick-and-Mortar StoresThe resulting shocks from the crisis triggered a retail reset, as retailers pivot from planning giant flagships with in-store experiences, to invest in better online experiences to be prepared for the next pandemic.The risk in betting on experiences hit last Friday when the American Dream Mall in the New Jersey Meadowlands, the first U.S. mall designed with more square feet devoted to experiences than retail, announced it was shutting down for at least the rest of March.Apart from this, large department stores, such as Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s have shut down their New York City locations to avoid the large congregations of people usually inside their large spaces spreading the deadly coronavirus.
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