agorafinancial.comAdChoicesAd covers the pageReport this adThanks for the feedback!InappropriateRepetitiveIrrelevantThanks for the feedback!But like any technology, the computers and the Internet, they do come with their own set of dangers, opening them up to abuse by less than conscientious individuals.Designer Keiichi Matsuda has and his vision, narrated in the video "Hyper-Reality", is rather frightening.You see neon colored text and images everywhere, floating like ghosts loosely attached to surfaces and people's heads.The video ends in a sort of comedy-tragedy duality, depending on your interpretation of the events.
Sunburns, loud music, and giant art installations: This year's Google I/O felt like a mixture of a developer's conference and a music festival.This year, Google did something entirely different with Google I/O than it has in years past.The result—for me, at least—was a hoard of sunburned developers slogging through 90-degree heat.But regardless of the weather, the massive venue afforded Google plenty of space to set up tents for sessions and art installations.Its other products were also on display, like Project Loon and the self-driving car, and there were even tents devoted to some of the smaller, lesser-known programs, like Google.org s Impact Challenge.After hours, the Shoreline transformed into a very mild rave of sorts, with neon lights galore and delicious food trucks on standby to feed hungry developers.
My left arm was bent at the elbow, ensuring my glowing blue shield was ready to protect me against my opponent s onslaught.In the 80s, I would have done anything to be transported into the world of Tron, a neon-drenched techno world where I could battle it out against other programs in a cyber sports arena, and perhaps rub shoulders with the titular hero.If you haven t heard of Project Arena, it s the work of games studio CCP, best known for Eve Online, and on the surface it s a love letter to sci-fi fans like me.A sports game that s not based on a real sport shouldn t be this immersive, because we have no basis for actual comparison, but it gets the adrenaline pumping immediately due to its intense, singular focus.However, CCP producer Morgan Godat told Digital Trends, I don t see how we can t make this a real game after all the positive feedback.Most games played in competitive eSports today are complex, and require a degree of knowledge from observers to follow and understand progress.
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Slide: 1 / of 7 .Caption: In this image from ESO s Very Large Telescope VLT , light from blazing blue stars energizes the gas left over from the stars recent formation.The result is a strikingly colorful emission nebula, called LHA 120-N55, in which the stars are adorned with a mantle of glowing gas.Astronomers study these beautiful displays to learn about the conditions in places where new stars develop.ESOAdvertisement
Laura MortonRelated GalleriesIkea's Clever Kit Makes Indoor Farming as Easy as It'll GetProject Ara Lives: Google's Modular Phone Is Ready for You NowApple's New SF Store Showcases Jony Ive's Design VisionHaunting Photos of Life 20 Years After the Bosnian WarSpace Photos of the Week: A Neon Nebula Struts Its StuffThe fact that nine out of every 10 startups fails doesn t keep people from descending on the San Francisco Bay Area with dreams of getting rich while changing the world.Everyone wants to be the Uber of something, convinced that the world needs an app to help people express their emotions or an online store selling party favors that glow in the dark.Her ongoing series takes you into the networking parties, hackathons and grubby crash pads where techies tap tap tap away at their laptops.Morton moved to San Francisco from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, a decade ago, drawn by its diversity and the idea that you could be whoever you wanted to be.Watching people type code or crunch data for hours on end is pretty boring.Her patience allowed her to capture moments others might miss, like the woman so engrossed in her VR headset she didn t realize everyone had left the room.
When spring finally, well, springs, its brilliance can feel unreal.To capture the surreality of springtime in New York City, 24-year-old photographer Paolo Pettigiani photoshopped images he snapped of Central Park to give them an infrared-filtered appearance.He describes the inspiration of the project on his personal site: The purpose is highlight the majesty and the contrast of nature included in the famous Big Apple s skyscrapers.Of note are Richard Mosse s infrared snaps of the Congo, which juxtapose the violent weaponry wielded by its subjects with the playfulness of neon pinks and brilliant blues.The effect is especially powerful when you add to it the consideration that infrared is a type of light on a wavelength that s not visible to the human eye.So, the message communicated by the image s vibrant rosiness and clear cerulean hues could be that the subject is beyond comprehension by the viewer; it s too picturesque.
View photosMoreA neon Google logo is seen at the new Google office in Toronto, November 13, 2012.The probe reflects an intensifying air of European indignation looming over Google and other U.S. tech companies as they amass huge amounts of cash while reducing their tax bills through complex maneuvers that shield their profits.At the end of last year, the U.S. technology sector had stockpiled $777 billion in cash, accounting for nearly half of the $1.68 trillion held by non-financial companies in the country, according to a study by Moody's Investors Service.European regulators increasingly are pressing companies to pay taxes in the jurisdictions in which they do business.The French government hasn't disclosed how much it believes Google might owe in back taxes, but it made an elaborate show of force in Tuesday's raid.With all signs indicating more cash will be pouring into the technology industry, the sector seems likely to remain in the crosshairs of financially strapped governments seeking more tax revenue.
Caption: The only surviving prototype of VVA14, a vertical takeoff aircraft, at the Russian Air Force Museum outside Moscow.Danila TkachenkoRelated GalleriesHack, Hustle, Nap, Repeat: Life as a Young Techie in San FranciscoSpace Photos of the Week: A Neon Nebula Struts Its StuffIkea's Clever Kit Makes Indoor Farming as Easy as It'll GetProject Ara Lives: Google's Modular Phone Is Ready for You NowThe New Underwater Olympus Is the Platypus of CamerasIn the early 1970s, the Soviet Union built an amphibious airplane designed to skim the sea, searching for US nuclear submarines.Tkachenko visited her in 2012, and started thinking about the tension between the promise of technology and the havoc it often wreaks.He worked on the project each winter for three years, traveling more than 15,000 miles through Russia, Kazakhstan and Bulgaria.I wanted to show the other side of progress and technology, Tkachenko says.It s not always leading us to better future, but can also be a failure or bring destruction.
Related GalleriesPlayboy Wouldn t Be Playboy Without Groovy Bachelor PadsThe New Underwater Olympus Is the Platypus of CamerasHack, Hustle, Nap, Repeat: Life as a Young Techie in San FranciscoSpace Photos of the Week: A Neon Nebula Struts Its StuffThe Snowy Graveyards Where Soviet Subs and Planes Go to DiePebble, which made the first smartwatch worth mentioning, is developing two new models, the Pebble 2 and the Pebble Time 2.The Core has a headphone jack, but also works with Bluetooth headphones if you hate wires.It also has GPS, so it plays nicely with Strava, Runkeeper, and Under Armour Record, and you can program one of its buttons to send an emergency text with your location just in case you pull a hammy.The two watches, which you ll find on Kickstarter next to the Core, feature a new software quirk called actions.Pressing the top button on the right side of the watch opens a list of one-tap options shows up: Text Anna, Call an Uber, whatever.The Pebble Time 2 is stainless steel and comes in gold, replacing both Pebble Time and Pebble Time Steel in a single device.
Honestly, it looks a bit weird at first glance, particularly when coupled with the leather string that hangs off the side like a bolo tie.It s a bit like the UE Roll, in that you can hang it on the wall, tie it to a backpack or throw it in a bag to take with you as I have been doing to and from the office for the past few days .That s not to say the speaker is fragile — it s scratch and dust resistant and strong enough to take a few knocks, should you decide to take it camping, but don t expect to, say, take a shower with the thing.That said, the Beoplay looks a heck of a lot better sitting on a desk or bookcase than the sporty, neon UE Roll, which is the energy drink of the Bluetooth speaker world making the A1 something more along the lines of a dry martini .The speakers deliver a nice mix of highs and lows in a full and surprisingly powerful sound from a small circumference.The speaker also gets plenty loud, capable of volumes higher than some larger speakers, without risking distortion.
Otis Johnson was released from prison in 2014 after being locked away for 44 years.He was 25 when his sentence started, and 69 when he was released.On the outside, he quickly realized the world was a very different place — downright futuristic compared to the world he left behind back in the late 1960s.In an interview and video for Al Jazeera, Johnson visited Times Square in New York City, where he was surprised and confused by the modern technology surrounding him: People "with wires in their ears" listening to music who looked like CIA agents, pedestrians "talking to themselves" on their iPhones, and neon video billboards illuminating storefront windows.Johnson offers a fascinating perspective on our world today and the modern technology that many shrug off and take for granted.You can watch the entire video below, or read Al Jazeera's original, in-depth interview with him here.
My eyes are bleeding with joyIf you love the bright lights and pulsing soundtracks found in the neon-soaked crop of 80's inspired games recently, Neon Drive, released last month but handily unearthed by Rock Paper Shotgun this morning, is probably your jam.It looks like it owes a significant debt to Audiosurf, but this seems to have a whole lot more to it, a collection of different modes where you can use your car or plane to avoid obstacles in time to music.It looks tougher than a very tough thing, too, with the Dev's offering to hand out Certificates of Superhuman Abilities to whoever manages to collect all the achievements.Some of the different game modes look fun too, there's your normal Audiosurf-esque mode and then there's some bits where you're barreling through flying traffic, escaping evil lasers and what appears to be Super Hexagon, but with 3d graphics and a plane.The soundtrack is pretty neat, although you can listen to that free here on SoundCloud.If you want to try the game that comes with it, you can get that for £6.99 on Windows and Mac.
But with the release of the iPhone and iPad, Apple went one step further and introduced an iOS version of iMovie to enable you to edit on the go.Apple's iMovie is now available as a free download on the latest iPhones.Movies use a range of different templates such as News, Travel or Neon good for creating pop videos ; trailers are like mini-movies packed with text overlays.One big tip: you can record video in both portrait and landscape orientation, but we strongly recommend you use landscape if possible, even if you shot your video in portrait mode.Landscape enables you to see longer video clips, editing is easier overall, and the icons feature accompanying text in case you forget which one does what.Here's how to put together a cinematic masterpiece on the move with the iMovie app…
With a length of 57 km 35 miles crossing the Alps, the Gotthard Base tunnel is the world's longest train tunnel.More than 2,200 years after the commander from the ancient North African civilization of Carthage led his army of elephants and troops over Europe's highest mountain chain, Swiss leaders have completed another gargantuan task — and on time: Burrowing the world's longest railway tunnel under the Swiss Alps to ease trade and congestion in European trade and travel.The thoroughfare aims to cut travel times, ease roadway traffic and draw cargo from pollution-spewing lorries trucking between Europe's north and south.German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Francois Hollande and Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi came for a flashy celebration featuring musical bands, dancers and even a tunnel theme song.In a glitzy show under purple neon lights, performers dressed up in orange miners' suits and protective helmets danced atop a moving rail car, while others in skimpy outfits feigned wrestling.Split-screen TV images showed two trains in opposition directions entering and leaving the tunnel entrances nearly simultaneously on both ends.
Vanity Fair got its hands on a kind of insane first-hand account of working at Facebook, adapted from a book by a former employee.After comparing Mark Zuckerberg to Thomas Jefferson, Napoleon and...uh... L.Ron Hubbard, former Facebook product manager Antonio Garcia Martinez explains the effect Zuck has on his employees:By imprinting this vision on his disciples, Zuckerberg founded the church of a new religion.Garcia also hones in on The Social Network s singular obsession with the threat of Google Plus, which... hit Facebook like a bomb.As was duly explained to the more recent employees, Lockdown was a state of war that dated to Facebook s earliest days, when no one could leave the building while the company confronted some threat, either competitive or technical.At 1:45 pm on the day Google Plus launched, he called a meeting around an illuminated neon Lockdown sign and Garcia likens the scene to a general addressing his troops in the field.Garcia s book, Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley, comes out June 28.
When Google launched in 2011, many saw it as a potential anti-Facebook – an alternative for someone who s ready to try something different.This was a neon sign bolted to the upper reaches of the Aquarium, above the cube of glass, almost like the NO VACANCY sign on a highway motel.Martinez also called Zuckerberg s speech aloof, geek-speak, and borderline psychopathic.But the lockdown would lead Facebook to think twice on code changes, rushing a product to market, and shape up overall to defend against its alleged war.The full book, Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley, is expected to hit the bookshelves later this summer.Read next: Nest Chief Fadell stepping down after 'grueling' year
Vanity Fair got its hands on a kind of insane first-hand account of working at Facebook, adapted from a book by a former employee.After comparing Mark Zuckerberg to Thomas Jefferson, Napoleon and...uh... L.Ron Hubbard, former Facebook product manager Antonio Garcia Martinez explains the effect Zuck has on his employees:By imprinting this vision on his disciples, Zuckerberg founded the church of a new religion.Martinez also hones in on The Social Network s singular obsession with the threat of Google Plus, which... hit Facebook like a bomb.As was duly explained to the more recent employees, Lockdown was a state of war that dated to Facebook s earliest days, when no one could leave the building while the company confronted some threat, either competitive or technical.At 1:45 pm on the day Google Plus launched, he called a meeting around an illuminated neon Lockdown sign and Martinez likens the scene to a general addressing his troops in the field.Martinez s book, Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley, comes out June 28th.
From Monday, anyone who uses the hashtag EURefReady will find a neon tick emoji appear in their tweet.During that promotion, users in the UK saw a reminder in their timelines and on that day almost 30% of all applications came from 18-to-24-year-old voters.Rob Owers, from Twitter UK, said: "We're excited to give people a new, fun way to have their voices heard ahead of 23 June."The EURef is one of the biggest decisions UK voters have been asked to make in decades, so we're keen to ensure people make the most of the live, global conversation unfolding on Twitter to inform their decision."The Commission says that under-25s and 25-to-34-year-olds are the groups making the most applications to register online.The Electoral Commission said that they started really pushing the hashtag EURefReady from Monday, but that they are working with a "range of different partner organisations" to ensure that the hashtag is used more widely up to the registration deadline.
It has 1U hardware boxes and these appear to be limited in what capacity SSDs can be supported.This would create, using SolidFire's naming convention, SF76810 and SF153610 nodes with 76.8TB and 153.6TB raw capacity respectively.Such a hypothetical SF153610 would reach 460.8TB with three nodes, a great improvement on the twenty SF19210 nodes needed currently.There seems to be no reason why, from a product marketing point of view, SolidFire couldn't have starting systems with 960TB drives, or less, and then a ladder of bigger supported drives; 1.92TB, 3.84TB, 7.68TB, and 15.36TB, for those customers who need the extra capacity and are willing to pay for it.Wright mentions four things that impact on high-cap SSD support:Decreased costIncreased capacity demandNew form-factors that aren't 10 drives per nodeElement OS workEMC, HPE and SolidFire parent NetApp all support larger SSDs than SolidFire so we would suggest they don't find the bullet-pointed items above an obstacle.Will it be a point release on the Fluorine base or will a future Neon major release Element 10 be needed?
Caption: Sharon BlanceRelated GalleriesPepper, the Emotional Robot, Learns How to Feel Like an AmericanBose's Noise-Cancelling Wonder Headphones Go WirelessAdidas Spins Plastic from the Ocean into Awesome KicksInfrared Photos Transform NYC Into a Technicolor DreamlandFather's Day Gift Guide: 10 Perfect Presents for the New DadNeon is to Hong Kong as red phone booths are to London and fog is to San Francisco.When night falls, reds and blues and other hues cast a hazy glow over a city illuminated by tens of thousands of neon signs.To me, neon represents a sense of nostalgia, and my goal was to capture the atmosphere, the feeling of it, says photographer Sharon Blance, whose series Hong Kong Neon celebrates the city s iconic signage.Neon signs fell out of vogue in the US and elsewhere after World War II, and in time was associated with lurid places like casinos, liquor stores and strip clubs.That started to change about a decade ago as city building inspectors cracked down on unauthorized signs—shutting down nearly 3,000 annually, by some estimates—and business owners swiched to LEDs.I just went to some of the known neon-rich areas and wandered around at night, and reacted to it in the moment, she says.
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