It s been a while since Samsung has been in the news for its exploding Galaxy Note7 batteries—and we sincerely hope any of our readers who bought has returned it to the company for a refund—but a team of enterprising engineers and developers who solve problems for a living may have discovered the root cause of the disaster.Samsung has been mostly mum about the issue since it announced in October that it was suspending production of the popular phablet more than a month after the first cases were reported , but all the while Instrumental has been researching the battery boondoggle behind the scenes.What it found is that the batteries themselves weren t faulty; rather, Samsung s push to make the case as thin as possible likely comprised them: The Note7 s lithium-polymer battery is a flattened jelly-roll consisting of a positive layer made of lithium cobalt oxide, a negative layer made of graphite, and two electrolyte-soaked separator layers made of polymer.The separator layers allow ions and energy to flow between the positive and negative layers, without allowing those layers to touch.If the positive and negative layers ever do touch, the energy flowing goes directly into the electrolyte, heating it, which causes more energy to flow and more heat—it typically results in an explosion.
the Three European country's capital, Paris, Madrid and Athens are planning to ban diesel cars in 2025.With the front is also one of Europe outside the capital, in the Mexican capital Mexico City.the Promise was made in mexico in the city of the mayor to the meeting.the World health organisation says air pollution causes annually three million premature deaths.diesel engines are the problem of the nitrogen oxide and particulate matter emissions.the capital of the mayor also pledged to do everything possible to promote electric, hydrogen and hybrid cars become more common, as well as public transport, told the BBC.
In a reversal similar to doctors no longer appearing in tobacco advertisements in the 1950s, some of the same international cities that extolled the virtues of small diesel-powered cars to its citizens 20 years ago are now planning to ban the oil burners, as reported by Ars Technica.The big push over air quality in the 1990s was for reducing carbon dioxide CO2 emissions.Diesel engines emit lower CO2 than gas engines, so the argument seemed a no-brainer.Diesel s higher nitrogen oxide and particulate outputs escaped notice at the time.So manufacturers and governments began to promote diesel power for cities with great success.In Europe, for example, diesel-powered cars grew from a 10 percent market share in the mid-1990s to 55 percent by 2012.
The carsharing service will now cover all of Zone 3Uber is doubling the area in which customers will be able to travel in its carsharing service in London.UberPool, which launched a year ago, is expanding in the capital to service riders in Zone 3.From 4pm on Friday, passengers will be able to catch an UberPool from or take it to anywhere within Zone 3, including Streatham, Wimbledon and City Airport.The service, which transports passengers going in a similar direction together, has saved more than 30kg of Nitrogen Oxide emissions."We are really pleased so many Londoners have chosen to share their Uber journeys over the last year," said Tom Elvidge, general manager of Uber in London.
So before you hit the sky this travel season, check out this history of gadgets and food hacks that made inflight feasting easier, cheaper, safer, and—yes—tastier.Before the age of commercial airliners, giant hot air balloons carried Europe s one percenters aloft.Lighting a match, let alone a stove, was verboten in these cramped balloons, but that didn t stop crews from cooking up a mess of fancy foods.1937: The Kitchen Takes OffIn the early days of American air service, the go-to meal was cold fried chicken.Thankfully, United Airlines eventually switched over to the new DC-3, which came with kitchen galleys that offered countertop prep spaces and interlocking thermoses for coffee and tea, according to Foss.
The Volkswagen diesel scandal has put increased scrutiny on carmakers, leading to accusations that VW wasn t the only company to cheat on emissions tests.Fiat Chrysler Automobiles FCA and engine supplier Cummins are now being sued over alleged attempts to hide excess emissions in Dodge and Ram heavy-duty pickup trucks, according to Bloomberg.Plaintiffs in the class-action suit are being represented by Seattle law firm Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro, which was involved with the Volkswagen 2.0-liter diesel settlement, and also filed a suit against General Motors alleging the Detroit automaker installed illegal defeat device software on Chevrolet Cruze Diesel models.The suit, which includes 500,000 owners, alleges that Chrysler and Cummins concealed the true nitrogen-oxide emissions of certain pickup trucks produced between 2007 and 2012.The pollutants were supposed to be captured and broken down in a process called regeneration in the trucks NOx Absorption Catalyst NAC , an emissions-control system that has since been superseded by Selective Catalytic Reduction SCR .The lawsuit claims the affected trucks actually let a significant amount of pollutants escape, sometimes nearly doubling emissions, increasing fuel consumption by up to 4 percent, and wearing out catalytic converters.
If the substance can be sprayed, the coating is suitable vaiikkapa-icing aircraft.American Houston university researchers have developed a new kind of slippery coating, which is, inter alia, a thin layer of a magnetic material and a magnetic iron oxide prepared liquid.When the surface gets wet from the water, the magnetic fluid to form a barrier, to which water droplets can not grasp.according to the researchers, the method outperforms by far the conventional antifreeze technologies, as it operates in temperatures as low as 34 degrees below zero.the Current best materials start to collect ice to 25 degrees.from the Substance will be developed sprayed, in which case it can be obtained from the ice-repellent surface of the aircraft wing and, say, electricity grids.
On Tuesday morning, US District Judge Charles Breyer gave final approval on a $14.7 billion settlement in the Volkswagen Group diesel emissions scandal that broke last September.The German automaker outfitted many of its diesel VWs and Audis with illegal software that reduced the cars emissions in the lab, but spewed up to 40 times the legal limit of nitrogen oxide NOx on the road.The automaker said that with the judge s approval, it would begin buying back affected diesels by mid-November.According to the terms of the settlement, VW Group has set aside $10.033 billion to buy back 475,474 2.0L diesel TDI vehicles at the value the car was worth in September 2015 before the EPA made public VW Group s misdeeds.Consumers and lessees will also get an additional payout of between $5,100 and $10,000 depending on the model and year of their car.The settlement does not include some 80,000 3.0L diesel VWs, Audis, and Porsches that were also equipped with illegal software—lawyers for VW Group, the Department of Justice DOJ , the Environmental Protection Agency EPA , the California Air Resources Board CARB , and consumers are still hashing that out.
If you re still wondering what Apple plans to reveal during its Hello Again media event this Thursday, three new portable Macs running MacOS 10.12 Sierra reportedly just passed Russian registration.As seen in a screenshot of the Russian listing, the country passed new portable personal computers by Apple using MacOS version 10.12.Over the weekend, KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo released a new research report forecasting what Apple will reveal during its event on Thursday.The company is expected to showcase products packing Intel s sixth-generation Skylake processors, and not the more recent Kaby Lake seventh-generation chips that are now cropping up in new laptops provided by Asus, Lenovo, Acer, and more.Of course, that info could be wrong, as the use of Skylake or Kaby Lake processors will depend on when Apple actually began production of its new Macs.Kuo s report also indicated that new MacBook Pros will have the same resolution as the previous generation, but the display itself will have better quality and energy efficiency due to its Oxide Thin Film Transistor LCD panel.
The NASA MAVEN space probe has captured some stunning images of Mars in the ultraviolet spectrum.The images give us an unprecedented view of the Martian atmosphere revealing how wind patterns occur at high altitude while also giving us a rare glimpse of how clouds form around some of Mars largest volcanoes.NASA then compiled the images from a period of seven hours and stitched them together to form this tantalising video see above .What we re seeing in these images in an effect called nightglow .It s caused by emissions of nitric oxide and is a planetary phenomenon which means that the night sky can sometimes glow, even in the absence of any external light.NASA MAVEN s Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph obtained these images of rapid cloud formation on Mars on July 9-10, 2016.
This morning, Stardock founder Brad Wardell announced the official name of the company s upcoming Star Control prequel: Star Control: Origins.For $35 £30 , players can join the studio s Founder s Program and get access to the closed beta and some additional developer goodies.Since then, Stardock has formed a new studio arm in Maryland and is producing the game in partnership with Oxide Games and Mohawk Games.Stardock s press release explains a bit more of the game s opening:The game starts in the year 2086 with the unaware humans receiving a distress call from an alien ship that has crashed on the moon of Triton leading to the formation of Star Control, an international space agency dedicated to protecting the Earth.The player takes on the role of The Captain of Earth s first interstellar ship whose first mission is to investigate the distress signal.
Electric cars like the BMW i3 could get priority at junctions over petrol and diesel vehiclesTo continue providing news and award winning journalism, we rely on advertising revenue.To continue reading, please turn off your ad blocker or whitelist us.Government proposals for five UK cities to adjust their road layouts to benefit electric cars, including giving the vehicles priority at traffic lights, has been branded as "baffling" by the president of the AA.The proposals have been put forward to try and reduce emissions in Birmingham, Leeds, Nottingham, Derby and Southampton by 2020.The so-called "clean air zones" will aim to reduce petrol and diesel traffic, and therefore the harmful nitrogen oxide those vehciles produce.
When elements combust, they create some wild-looking compounds.After watching this video, you re going to want to torch the entire periodic table.Sodium, which starts out as a silver-white metal, first turns into sodium oxide, which is like a white powder, then turns into molten sodium, which is hot metal goo, and then turns into this purple egg-ish thing before finally bursting into flames and ending as sodium peroxide, which is totally gnarly.The video, Elemental Burning by Yan Liang, also features carbon, phosphorus, magnesium, and sulphur... on fire.
When elements combust, they create some wild-looking compounds.After watching this video, you re going to want to torch the entire periodic table.Sodium, which starts out as a silver-white metal, first turns into sodium oxide, which is like a white powder, then turns into molten sodium, which is hot metal goo, and then turns into this purple egg-ish thing before finally bursting into flames and ending as sodium peroxide, which is totally gnarly.The video, Elemental Burning by Yan Liang, also features carbon, phosphorus, magnesium, and sulphur... on fire.
View photosMoreA Dodge Ram 2014 pickup truck on the assembly line in a file photo.WASHINGTON Reuters - Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV and engine manufacturer Cummins Inc are fighting over the $200 million estimated cost for a recall of 130,000 Ram pickup trucks equipped with Cummins diesel engines that could exceed U.S. pollution limits.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board have demanded a recall of 2013 through 2015 model year Ram 2500 pickup trucks with 6.7L Cummins diesel engines because moisture can lead to the deactivation of the selective catalyst reduction system, causing excess nitrogen oxide emissions, Cummins said in court documents that have not been previously reported.A lawyer for Fiat Chrysler, John Berg, said at a Sept. 23 court hearing in Detroit the recall could cost $200 million, according to a transcript.The auto maker is willing to cooperate in the recall, Berg said."What we are not willing to do is bear the cost of it," he said.
Late last Friday, Volkswagen Group agreed to pay 652 Volkswagen dealers a total of $1.21 billion in a settlement that was proposed earlier this summer.Each dealer would receive approximately $1.85 million.The settlement is related to the emissions scandal that broke over a year ago—VW Group was producing diesel Jettas, Beetles, Golfs, and Passats, as well as Audis and Porsches, that were giving off significantly more nitrogen oxide NO than the company claimed to the Environmental Protection Agency EPA .To goose the numbers, the cars were outfitted with illegal software that engaged the emissions control systems on the cars when they were being tested in the lab but relaxed emissions controls while the cars were on the road.When the EPA announced that it discovered VW Group s defeat devices, Volkswagen dealers across the US were suddenly left with cars they couldn t sell sitting on their lots.Lawyers for the dealers also argued that they should be compensated for VW s tarnished image, which hurt their sales.
PARIS Reuters - Toyota has decided to drop diesel engines from its new C-HR compact in the wake of Volkswagen's emissions scandal and will probably do the same for future model renewals, the carmaker's second-ranking global executive said on Thursday.The Japanese automaker decided "within the last six to 12 months" not to offer a diesel version of the car, unveiled at the Paris auto show, because demand for the powertrain technology is falling sharply, Executive Vice President Didier Leroy told Reuters in an interview.If faced with a renewal decision today for other models up to and including the larger Auris compact, a Toyota staple, "we would probably do the same thing", Leroy added.Toyota's decision is the latest example of how the so-called "dieselgate" scandal is forcing carmakers to rewrite strategic plans that will shape their futures for years to come.Reuters reported this month that Renault expects diesel engines to disappear from most of its European cars after the French automaker reviewed the costs of meeting tighter emissions standards following Volkswagen's scandal.While the scandal centered on the German carmaker's cheat software, it also focused public attention on an industry-wide disparity between nitrogen oxide NOx emissions on the road and those recorded in regulatory tests.
The new Toyota C-HR crossover won't come with a diesel option signalling the end for future models.The chugging sound of a diesel Toyota engine may become a distant memory as the manufacturer has decided to not include diesel options for its latest C-HR crossover model signalling that it could be taken off the road forever in the future.Dropping the diesel variant has arisen following a falling demand for the powertrain and after the dieselgate emissions scandal that hit rival manufacturer Volkswagen earlier in 2016.Toyota's executive vice president, Didier Leroy, told Reuters that the decision to ditch diesel was made "within the last six to 12 months" and that they "would probably do the same thing" when it comes to making decisions on other cars in its fleet.Diesel has faced a rocky road ahead ever since the huge revelation that VW had been purposely modifying its diesel-engined cars to pass emissions tests, before it was then discovered they were actually emitting between 10 and 40 times more nitrogen oxide than allowed by US law.As a result tighter emissions standards have been brought in to effect, making it harder and more expensive for manufacturers to meet.
Samantha Lee/Business Insider Celebrity chef Alton Brown offers a laundry list of useful high-tech kitchen gadgets at the beginning of his newThere's the electronic food scale, the propane torch, and of course the nitrous oxide foamer — to name just a few.But the "Cutthroat Kitchen" host says there's one item no kitchen should be without: a sturdy pair of
In the phablet, the silent phablet, the LiOn sleeps tonightExplainer It has been a bad month for Samsung.Following the release of the dual-curved, 5.7 inch-screen, water-resistant Galaxy Note 7 phablet, the number of fires have increased thanks to its reportedly explosive battery.The Korean tech giant reacted by halting sales, recalling units and launching an investigation.The disaster led to share prices plummeting on 12 September by 6.98 per cent.What causes a series of batteries to become faulty?
This technology isn't limited to big devices like photovoltaic panels and wind turbines; recently, a team of researchers has developed a textile capable of harnessing energy from both sunlight and wind.The team developed a fabrication strategy that merged two different lightweight, low-cost polymer fibers to create energy-producing textiles.The second is a nanogenerator capable of converting mechanical energy into electricity.The photovoltaic portion of the textile was composed of a copper-coated polymer fiber that was then further coated with concentric layers of manganese, zinc-oxide/dye, and copper iodide—the zinc oxide is a photovoltaic material, while the copper helps harvest the charges.The second energy-generating material was based on triboelectric generation, where certain materials generate electricity when they experience friction.This was done using an industrial weaving machine, so no specialized equipment is needed.
Then earlier this month it revealed the specs of its two new devices - the Cadenza and Monolith Chaconne - to almost overwhelming skepticism and derision.The Cadenza boasts two unannounced Qualcomm Snapdragon 830 chipsets, 12GB of RAM, 1TB of storage and a 60 megapixel camera, while the Monolith Chaconne goes one better by including three 830 chipsets, 18GB of RAM and a slide-out keyboard.Both are constructed from a Graphene Oxide composite and include Hydrogen fuel cells as part of their hybrid power system.Despite the dismissive response from the tech media, TRI CEO and Chief Architect Steve Chao remains unfazed.The scant consolation to those who handed over more than $600 a year ago is the fact that their orders have been upgraded to the Turing Phone Dark Wyvern model and the company is currently shipping out free-of-charge "evaluation" units before the final production edition arrives - which will include an improved Snapdragon 821 chipset."I'm not very concerned about the glitches we've encountered," says Chao when quizzed on whether or not such problems will impact the firm's future projects.
Audio is one of the hot battlegrounds in mobile technology, but no matter how good speakers have become they still operate on the century-old concept of making sound by moving a diaphragm to push air molecules around.Manufacturers have been searching for ways to make a truly solid-state speaker good enough to power the next generation of devices, and they may have just found it with a mash-up of graphene and aerogel science.Graphene is formed of sheets of pure carbon with a thickness of just one atom; it is the thinnest material in the known universe and holds much promise for future tech from wearable electronics to nano-sized drug-delivery systems.Aerogels, in contrast, are the lowest density solid materials ever made, so tenuous they barely weigh anything, and are sometimes called 'frozen smoke'.Now scientists in Korea have cooked graphene sheets into an aerogel, and say they have solved the main problems in making thin, flat speakers that perform well and can be mass produced.Their N-doped reduced graphene oxide aerogel, or N-rGOA, loudspeakers are tiny, less than a millimetre thick, and produce 'outstanding acoustic performance' with a much higher sound pressure level SPL, or volume to you and me for the power than any conventional speaker.
Audio is one of the hot battlegrounds in mobile technology, but no matter how good speakers have become they still operate on the century-old concept of making sound by moving a diaphragm to push air molecules around.Manufacturers have been searching for ways to make a truly solid-state speaker good enough to power the next generation of devices, and they may have just found it with a mash-up of graphene and aerogel science.Graphene is formed of sheets of pure carbon with a thickness of just one atom; it is the thinnest material in the known universe and holds much promise for future tech from wearable electronics to nano-sized drug-delivery systems.Aerogels, in contrast, are the lowest density solid materials ever made, so tenuous they barely weigh anything, and are sometimes called 'frozen smoke'.Now scientists in Korea have cooked graphene sheets into an aerogel, and say they have solved the main problems in making thin, flat speakers that perform well and can be mass produced.Their N-doped reduced graphene oxide aerogel, or N-rGOA, loudspeakers are tiny, less than a millimetre thick, and produce 'outstanding acoustic performance' with a much higher sound pressure level SPL, or volume to you and me for the power than any conventional speaker.
James Liang worked for Volkswagen's Wolfsburg plant while he developed diesel engines.In a Detroit District Court today, 62-year-old engineer James Robert Liang pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud the government, commit wire fraud, and violate the Clean Air Act.Liang, currently a California resident, worked for Volkswagen s diesel development department in Wolfsburg, Germany from 1983 to 2008.Volkswagen Group has been beset by scandal since last September, when the Environmental Protection Agency EPA made public that VW had been including illegal software in diesel Volkswagens and Audis.The software detected when the cars were being tested in a lab so that they could pass emissions tests, but once the cars hit real-world conditions, the software circumvented the emissions control system to spew large amounts of nitrogen oxide NOx into the atmosphere.According to the plea agreement PDF , in 2006 Liang and others began building the EA 189 diesel engine that has been the center of the controversy.
Russian officials are looking into a phenomenon that's been documented by a flurry of pictures on social media: one of the country's northernmost rivers turning a bloodlike bright red.CNN reports that the Daldykan River shifted to a rouge hue on Tuesday, and while some are saying the cause could be iron ore in the ground, Russia's environmental ministry says it's investigating the Norilsk Nickel factory located nearby, citing in a press release a possible "break in a Norilsk Nickel slurry pipe" that may have dumped a chemical into the water, the Guardian notes.A mining expert explains to the Verge that certain oxidation processes or those that use high heat—like ones that may be used in the nickel plant—can convert sulfide minerals into iron oxide, which can turn water red if they mix together.Residents in the area tell a local newspaper they've seen this happen before, though they're not elaborating.Norilsk Nickel, which says it's the world's "largest producer of nickel and palladium," is trying to deflect the finger-pointing, though it says it will tamp down production during the probe.Upper management there may also need to call the eye doctor.
Anyone who s lived in a smoggy city would likely welcome the idea of using widely dispersed air filters to soak up all those toxic tidbits floating around—unless, of course, those filters were functioning human brains.Our noggins naturally catch and collect the toxic, magnetic nanoparticles that we inadvertently inhale from polluted air, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Those wee particles, made of the strongly magnetic iron oxide compound, magnetite, have been found in human brains before and were thought to be normal and harmless byproducts of biological processes.But according to the new study, a closer examination of minuscule metal balls in 37 human brains revealed that they re actually from smog, formed during combustion or friction-derived heating, such as slamming on the brakes of a car.Whether the particles are harmful is hazy, but the authors note that the nanomagnets have two troubling features: they can interact with misfolded proteins associated with Alzheimer s disease to produce reactive oxygen species, which can severely damage cells; and large amounts of them in the brain correlated with Alzheimer s disease in earlier studies.Given these potential risks, the authors—a team of researchers from the UK and Mexico—suggest that exposure to them might need to be examined as a possible hazard to human health.
the Content of the lithium-ion batteries to anävndas in the manufacture of new products.Photo: K. Selsam-Geißler, Fraunhofer ISCNew-Bat is a startup project to develop a safe and inexpensive method to recover valuable materials from old lithium-ion batteries, and use them in the manufacture of new products.It is German ministry of research BMBF which is investing € 1.6 million to find recycling technologies which makes it possible to reuse as much material as possible from the end-of-life lithium-ion batteries.With the traditional metallurgical recycling methods extracted from the batteries today are nickel, cobalt and manganese.But it would be more valuable if the lithium-metal oxide and different carbon compounds could also be recycled.
Germany blames Fiats diesel engines, the manipulation of states and the emission of gold plating.the German transport ministry has insisted the Italian ministry and Fiat Chrysler automobiles from the FCA unsuccessfully to report suspected diesel manipulation of states.to Accelerate clearance the germans have approached the issue in the EU-the commission, by letter, told German financial magazine Wirtschaftswoche.the Dispute began in may, when the German transport office KBA doubt of their investigations on the basis of Fiat used 500X-model diesel engine in unauthorized technology nitrogen oxide emissions to embellish.after The list of suspects has expanded to at least the Fiat Doblo and Jeep Renegadeen.KBA's tests of automotive exhaust gas purifiers stopped working on 22 minutes after.
Note: Our sand to silicon chips feature has been fully updated.This article was first published in May 2009.Strange things happen in forests – especially Silicon Forest, as Hillsboro in Oregon has come to be known.That's where D1X, Intel's largest operational fabrication plant, is based – and it's where what would have once seemed like a miracle of engineering is performed all day every day.D1X is where processors measuring just 14 millionths of a millimetre across are made, ready to be shipped to motherboard and PC manufacturers all over the world.Step one: Get some sand
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