Given the rate of turnover in the smartphone market, it is almost expected that consumers change phones every two to three years. It’s definitely unheard of for people to hold on to five-year-old phones that may not even be able to run the latest versions of Android, for example. In that case, very few people might be affected by T-Mobile’s … Continue reading
Ever since my first actual Android smartphone (no, the first Galaxy Tab doesn’t count), my main driver has always been a Galaxy Note user, only skipping the Galaxy Note 4 (not much of a differentiator) and the Galaxy Note 7 (fire hazard).That meant it was designed for use cases like writing and drawing, otherwise why bother with the cost of having a pressure-sensitive stylus.And like any digital artist or note taker will tell, every bit of space on the paper counts.And it’s a problem that won’t be exclusive to the Galaxy Note.It’s not just content thet gets affected by this curved design.They’re touch sensitive as well and they don’t always differentiate your fingers from parts of your palm.
*Just to clarify, there is no such mode called ‘beast mode’ in the new Galaxy Note 4. Galaxy Note 4 has been labeled a “beast”. Well, the so-called ‘beast’ is finally out of the box and people will have plenty of time get to know it. Only then will they be able to judge if the nickname is actually appropriate or not. Until then, let’s go with the flow. 
Here at IFA 2014 in Berlin, the Galaxy Alpha is on display front and center at the Samsung booth. As many people seem to agree, it is hard not to notice the shiny Galaxy Alpha, even next to the new Galaxy Note 4. From what we’ve seen, when you see it, you’ve got to check it out. 
The Galaxy Note 4 features a bigger screen with multi-screen functionality that offers real benefits to users that want a mobile device that can power them through their working day. 
Samsung Introduces the Latest in its Iconic Note Series – The Galaxy Note 4, and Showcases Next Generation Display with Galaxy Note Edge Offering a new dimension to Samsung’s unique Note culture, the Galaxy Note 4 and Note Edge strengthen Samsung’s category leadership with the most progressive mobile devices on the market Samsung Electronics announced the expansion of its flagship Galaxy Note series with the new Galaxy Note 4 and Galaxy Note Edge. 
Samsung Galaxy Note 4 SM N910F 4G 32GB (Unlocked)The 5.7″ Quad HD Super AMOLED display has an incredible range of precise colours and high contrast to give you a vivid picture that is like looking with the naked eye.It’s an amazing high-resolution viewing experience that lets you make the most of web browsing and eBooks.A 3.7MP front-facing F1.9 lens camera and 16MP Smart OIS back camera give you the best results for capturing every moment – even in dark surroundings.Thanks to a faster charging speed, the Galaxy Note 4 doesn’t keep you waiting.Go from zero to 50% in around 30 minutes, instead of almost an hour.
In nearly a decade and a half covering the tech industry, I've had the privilege of witnessing companies go all out when showing off their new products.One of the more awkward is the image of Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin on Rollerblades gliding up to the stage to talk about the T-Mobile G1, the original Android phone.From the over-the-top Samsung Galaxy Note 4 presentation at Radio City Music Hall in New York to David Blaine performing at the launch of the dual-screen Kyocera Echo (the magician's tricks were far more memorable than the phone), companies have pulled stunts to nab your attention.Given its success today, it's easy to forget that Android faced a heavy dose of skepticism at the start."It certainly seemed like there was an uphill battle," said Ross Rubin, an analyst at Reticle Research, who was also at the event."It was clear we were on the cusp of something major," said Avi Greengart, an analyst at Global Data who attended the event.
In nearly a decade and a half covering the tech industry, I've had the privilege of witnessing companies go all out when showing off their new products.From the over-the-top Samsung Galaxy Note 4 presentation at Radio City Music Hall in New York to David Blaine performing at the launch of the dual-screen Kyocera Echo (the magician's tricks were far more memorable than the phone), the moments are seared into my brain.I certainly can't unsee the image of two guys skating onto a stage in Rollerblades at an event space in Manhattan and bantering before discussing a new phone.Those two guys: Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin.Given its success today, it's easy to forget that Android faced a heavy dose of skepticism at the start.When Google finally took the wraps off Android on Sept. 23, 2008, it partnered with HTC, a little-known company that made smartphones carrying the brand names of other companies.
In nearly a decade and a half covering the tech industry, I've had the privilege of witnessing companies go all out when showing off their new products.From the over-the-top Samsung Galaxy Note 4 presentation at Radio City Music Hall in New York to David Blaine performing at the launch of the dual-screen Kyocera Echo (the magician's tricks were far more memorable than the phone), the moments are seared into my brain.Those two guys: Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin.Given its success today, it's easy to forget that Android faced a heavy dose of skepticism at the start.When Google finally took the wraps off Android, it partnered with HTC, a little-known company that made smartphones carrying the brand names of other companies."It certainly seemed like there was an uphill battle," said Ross Rubin, an analyst at Reticle Research, who was also at the event.
We’ve been talking about smartphone industrial design over the last week or so, and a big point raised over and over is that the last of the major plastic backed devices, the Samsung Galaxy S5, remains “the best phone Samsung ever made.”The Leading Attorneys in Mountain View.It’s time to talk aesthetics versus functionality, and how flashy phones don’t always follow trends for the right reasons.Just look at the automotive industry.Just because an old Jeep looks ugly to some, doesn’t mean it’s not everything you need.Some people want that kind of practicality in their cars, and in their smartphones too.
There many Chinese smartphone brands in the market.But there are also even more Chinese smartphone manufacturers you are not aware of.Vice versa, they are new in the niche and it requires some time to find their place under the sun.Recently, the manufacturer came in with a couple of large-battery handsets that are priced quite affordable.At this moment, we are going to take a quick look at the Infinix Note 4, which has got a 14% price off at GearBest and is offered for only $138.99.The selling point of the Infinix Note 4 is its 4300mAh battery.
Looking back at dozens of Fortune 500 companies' advertising campaigns last quarter, Taykey’s Real-Time Trend Report revealed that tech trends clearly dominated the most successful ads.When I say “trends,” I mean any topic that drives attention and engagement across any number of online sources.So the Samsung Galaxy Note 4, for instance, is a trend that may have emerged out of news articles announcing its release date, tweets from tech leaders and gadgeteers, blog comments on a review or replays on a promo video.The trends about tech produced one out of five real-time advertising impressions last quarter, and drove outstanding engagement with ad content.What’s interesting about these trends is they have very broad-reaching impacts beyond the tech industry.For instance, ads about food and beverage goods, consumer products and retail items enjoyed the very same boosts in ad performance that tech gadgets did.
Samsung is recalling thousands of batteries from its Galaxy Note 4 smartphone, raising concerns about the launch of the next generation of the device next week.The Korean electronics giant is recalling 10,000 batteries fitted in the 2014 model of the Note phone that were fixed as part of a US insurance programme.Unlike the Note 7 debacle, which led to a global recall of millions of phones because of a manufacturing fault in the batteries, the Note 4 problem only affects devices that were repaired by FedEx Supply Chain through AT's insurance programme.Some of the devices in the scheme, distributed between December 2016 and April 2017, were fitted with "counterfeit" batteries, which caused them to overheat, according to Samsung.The US consumer watchdog advised owners who are concerned their device could be affected to stop using the battery immediately.The incident comes at a crucial time for Samsung, which is hoping to regain consumer confidence in the Note brand when it unveils the Galaxy Note 8 next week.
Phablets sent to AT customers with batteries from FedEx are at riskSamsung's got another combustible phablets SNAFU on its hands, after the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission recalled the batteries used in its Galaxy Note 4.This time there's smoke but the fire's someone else's fault: the problem this time applies to “batteries placed into refurbished AT Samsung Galaxy Note 4 cellphones by FedEx Supply Chain and distributed as replacement phones through AT’s Insurance program only.”Also good news for Samsung is that the Commission estimates just 10,200 batteries might be dangerous, and only one's been reported to have overheated, with “no reports of injuries or property damage.” So this doesn't look like a mess to match the global recall of the Galaxy Note 7, which burned a hole in Samsung's profits and reputation.Owners of the affected devices will soon receive mail from FedEx Suply chain, with a replacement battery and return envelope for the potentially-dangerous unit enclosed.Until that arrives, owners are advised to “immediately stop using the recalled battery and power down their smartphone.”
On Wednesday the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a recall on certain Galaxy Note 4 batteries.These batteries have a tendency to overheat, according to the CPSC, which poses risk of burns and fire hazards.Since then, Samsung has vowed to make safer batteries and has even instilled an eight-point battery check.This is crucial because Samsung is set to unveil the Galaxy Note 7 successor, the Galaxy Note 8, on August 23.Our first question is how this could have happened just now, when the Galaxy Note 4 is a three-year-old phone?Well, it's actually not Samsung's fault.
Finnish consumers do not need to be concerned about.the United states the most influential consumer product safety committee (CPSC) urges all Samsung Galaxy Note 4 -phone users to immediately stop device to be operated.CPSC:according to the certain phone the battery can overheat, cause burns and a fire hazard.This is already the second Samsung Galaxy devices the setback in less than a year.Last September, the Galaxy Note 7 phone was pulled from the market the same type of problems.even Then the battery will overheat, explode and cause fires.
This is probably the last bit of news Samsung wanted to pop up in headlines in the weeks leading up to the Note 8 launch.Though, to be fair, this latest battery recall isn’t actually on Samsung.The US Consumer Product Safety Commission has issued a recall for refurbished Galaxy Note 4 batteries.While the news has undeniable echoes of last year’s massive Note 7 disaster, this time out, the fault appears to fall at the feet of potentially counterfeited batteries supplied by FedEx.As the company noted in a statement to TechCrunch, “FedEx Supply Chain handles more than the transportation of these devices.We deliver technology-based solutions for customers that include repair, refurbishment and testing.”
Talk about deja vu: batteries for the Galaxy Note 4, of all phones, are being recalled.While it may seem like we’re heading for a repeat of last fall at first blush, it seems that this recall is vastly different from the Note 7 fiasco that happened last year.For starters, Samsung isn’t even the one responsible for these battery problems.Instead, the issue lies with Galaxy Note 4 batteries that were supplied by FedEx Supply Chain.According to the official recall on the US Consumer Product Safety Commission’s website, these batteries have the potential to overheat, causing fires and burn hazards.There are about 10,200 batteries included in this recall, so while that number is significant, it doesn’t come close to the number of Galaxy Note 4 handsets out in the wild.
It seems that there is some more trouble with Samsung's Galaxy Note line of phones.Today the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) issued a recall on batteries used in the Galaxy Note 4.The power supplies are being recalled due to the potential to “overheat, posing burn and fire hazards.” The CPSC urges anyone with an affected device to immediately stop using it and power it down.If this sounds familiar, it’s because it was only last September that Samsung issued a recall of all Galaxy Note 7s due to a similar problem.Over a million phones were recalled with more than 90 confirmed incidents of batteries either overheating, exploding, or catching fire.The voluntary recall was initiated by FedEx Supply Chain and only pertains to 10,000 affected devices.
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