All that is going to be the job of a new entity, HMD Global Oy, run by present and past Nokians.The fund is managed by Jean-Francois Baril, a former Nokia executive, as well as by HMD management.Nokia s strategy was outlined 18 months ago, when Nokia Technologies President Ramzi Haidamus vowed that We will go beyond tablets for sure.Satya Nadella wanted it even less.HMD reminds us it has exclusive access to the pre-eminent global sales and distribution network to be acquired by FIH from Microsoft, as well as access to FIH s world-leading device manufacturing and engineering capabilities, and its growing suite of proprietary mobile technologies and components .There s money in brand licensing when the technology brand retains trust and an emotional appeal.
Microsoft Lumia 435 Microsoft's mantra was for many years a large volume, low costs, and the company announced plans to acquire Nokia's puhelinbisnekset, Microsoft seemed old to continue their line, writes ZDNet. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella announced last July that the company will cut the number of new phones to be launched and focuses instead on a certain market areas, with emphasis on high-quality devices. Three Nadellan key markets were business users, pioneering / fan-customers, as well as the value of phone buyers. No, of course not certain whether Nadellan and his team objectives are still exactly the same as at that time. ZDNet According to market increasingly moving speeches that Panos Panay of Microsoft's team has puskenut forward the creation of new phones and new types of devices. In the meantime, Microsoft's telephone system has largely been passed on only to support the existing Lumia handsets, as well as to root out the Nokia losses.
To learn more and subscribe, please click here.Microsoft has announced that is selling its entry-level phone business to FIH Mobile and HMD global Oy for $350 million as the tech giant continues to distance itself from mobile hardware.The move was not a surprise given how Microsoft has been reducing its feature phone business since CEO Satya Nadella took over.But what is noteworthy is that the press release indicated that Microsoft might never release another Lumia phone ever again, reports The Verge.Nowhere does the press release mention the development of any new Lumia devices or any future hardware.Furthermore, the announcement came just after the leak of an internal memo that reiterated Microsoft's commitment to mobile software, which also did not mention Lumia devices.The likely course of action for Microsoft is to build a Surface phone that targets the company's business customers, with a focus on device security and privacy.The pool of first-time buyers in these countries is shrinking rapidly, and sales are now primarily coming from phone upgrades.Meanwhile, emerging markets will continue to see robust shipment growth.India and Indonesia, in particular, will help fuel a large share of the shipments growth within the global smartphone market over the next few years.Will McKitterick, senior research analyst at BI Intelligence, Business Insider's premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on smartphones by country that forecasts the market through 2021 to reflect slower, stabilizing growth in the long term.Here are some key points from the report:The global smartphone market is still growing at a steady pace due to more widespread adoption in emerging markets.Still, the vendor saw a slight decline in YoY growth of its share of the market in the face of stiff competition from Samsung and Chinese vendors such as Huawei.In full, the report:Forecasts global smartphone shipments through 2021.Explores why India is the next high-growth smartphone market.Breaks down the global smartphone platform wars.Discusses smartphone vendor performance market share.To get your copy of this invaluable guide, choose one of these options:Subscribe to an ALL-ACCESS Membership with BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report AND over 100 other expertly researched deep-dive reports, subscriptions to all of our daily newsletters, and much more.
Microsoft is building a Bing Concierge Bot — a new bot for messaging apps like WhatsApp or Facebook Messenger which "does what a human assistant would do," according to a job posting for a software engineer.Much like the just-announced Google Assistant, and Facebook's still-in-testing M, it sounds like Bing Concierge will let you get stuff done straight from your chat app.Tell Bing Concierge to book you a table at your favorite restaurant, for example, and it will ask how many and then go out to the web and do it for you.Under the hood, Bing Concierge will likely be powered by the same technology that lets Microsoft's existing Cortana assistant help you with your day-to-day tasks and answer questions.But where Cortana "lives" inside Windows 10 and a pair of Android and iPhone apps, Bing Concierge can help you in the apps you already use, like Skype or WhatsApp or Messenger — just start a conversation.That's also an edge over Google Assistant and Facebook M, which are limited to the Google Allo and Facebook Messenger services, respectively.Microsoft wants to infiltrate Facebook Messenger with a new concierge botThe existence of Bing Concierge doesn't come as a huge surprise.Earlier this year, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella announced a series of new tools to help developers build their own chatbots, calling the concept "conversations as a platform."Nadella has even gone so far as to say that the idea of talking to a bot to get stuff done could be as revolutionary as the touchscreen or the web itself.So, given the company's existing investment into the technology, with Cortana and with its chatbot framework, it makes perfect sense to buy into its own hype and build a bot based on Bing.
HELSINKI/SAN FRANCISCO Reuters - Microsoft Corp announced more big cuts to its smartphone business on Wednesday, just two years after it bought handset maker Nokia in an ill-fated attempt to take on market leaders Apple Inc and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd.In a move that clearly puts the stamp of two-year chief executive Satya Nadella on the U.S. company, Microsoft said it would shed up to 1,850 jobs, most of them in Finland, and write down $950 million from the business.Remaking Microsoft, known primarily for its software, into a more device-focused company was a hallmark of previous chief executive Steve Ballmer.Since then, Nadella has shaved away at the phone business, starting with a 2015 restructuring that put the devices group, previously a stand-alone unit under former Nokia chief Stephen Elop, under the Windows group."My understanding is that Windows 10 will go on as an operating system, but there will be no more phones made by Microsoft," said Kalle Kiili, a shop steward.Nokia, now focused on telecom network equipment, just last week said it was cutting around 1,000 jobs in Finland following its acquisition of Franco-American rival Alcatel-Lucent.
That's bad news for a company whose stated strategy is to see Windows 10 running on all form factors, and a billion total devices by 2018.In fact, having a mobile component is a key part of Microsoft's developer pitch: Universal Windows Apps aren't much good if there aren't any phones to run them on."Two-in-ones have become one of the hottest segments in IT," says Tim Bajarin, president of analyst firm Creative Strategies.But if you look at the new Surfaces and Lenovos, they're sleek."That product finally got the right mix of portability and power, and today the Surface line is the poster child for the adaptability of the Windows 10 platform.The real value proposition is they are now selling complete solutions, and their enterprise stuff is more and more focused around the Surface branding."
Microsoft has announced plans to lay off up to 1,850 employees, a move that will largely impact its mobile hardware division in Finland.The news is the latest in a long line of setbacks to emerge from Microsoft s doomed $8 billion Nokia acquisition.Three months after the deal was closed back in April 2014, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella revealed that the company would be cutting up to 18,000 jobs, almost three-quarters of which belonged to former Nokia staff.A year later, in July 2015, Microsoft announced a major restructuring plan for its mobile business, with up to 7,800 job cuts.The company revealed that 4,500 employees would have the opportunity to join one of the two firms — a move that also heralded the return of Nokia to the mobile phone hardware realm.Microsoft hasn t entirely pulled the plug on its mobile phone business — it recently confirmed it will continue working on Lumia-branded phones, and it is also rumored to be working on its own Surface Phone under the stewardship of Nadella.But the company has announced its mission to reinvent productivity and business processes, build the intelligent cloud platform, and create more personal computing.We are focusing our phone efforts where we have differentiation — with enterprises that value security, manageability and our Continuum capability, and consumers who value the same, said Nadella in a statement today.
A week after selling off its feature phone division, Microsoft has announced that it s also streamlining its smartphone hardware business, cutting 1,850 jobs in the process.In a statement, Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, explained that: We are focusing our phone efforts where we have differentiation — with enterprises that value security, manageability and our Continuum capability, and consumers who value the same.We will continue to innovate across devices and on our cloud services across all mobile platforms.The move will see 1,350 jobs lost at Microsoft Mobile Oy in Finland—formerly part of Nokia—as well as a 500 more lost globally.It seems that Microsoft is bringing an end to its flirtation with phone hardware, which started when it purchased Nokia s phone division three years ago for $7.1 billion.Recode has published a leaked internal memo from Microsoft, in which Terry Myerson—Executive Vice President of the Windows and Devices Group—explains that it will continue to work on mobile.
Microsoft Corp. will cut as many as 1,850 jobs and take a new impairment charge as Chief Executive Officer Satya Nadella pares back the company s ambitions in smartphones.The company will take a $950 million impairment and restructuring charge, including $200 million for severance payments, Microsoft said in an e-mailed statement.Last July, the company said it planned to cut as many as 7,800 jobs and write down the handset business by $7.6 billion while earlier this month it agreed to sell its feature phone unit.Redmond, Washington-based Microsoft expects to complete most of the announced actions by the end of 2016 with further details to be released with fourth-quarter earnings in July.Microsoft sold its feature phone business to FIH Mobile Ltd. and HMD global for $350 million.Windows phones had less than 1 percent of the global smartphone market in the first quarter, according to Gartner Inc. That compares with Android s 84 percent and 15 percent for Apple s iOS.The cuts are a further blow to Finland, which is struggling to reduce unemployment and revive an economy hurt by Nokia s mobile-phone demise.Nadella has been trying to revitalize the company that was once known mainly for personal-computer software by focusing on Web-based services and productivity applications.The company is slashing costs and concentrating on Windows 10 to restore growth in PCs.While Microsoft s push into smartphones hasn t worked out as planned, the company continues to develop hardware such as its Surface tablet computers.
Following last week s news of Microsoft selling off its feature phone business for $350 million, today Microsoft turned its attention to smartphones: the company announced it would lay off 1,850 staff and take a charge of $950 million, including $200 million in severance payments, as it streamlines the business to focus on enterprises and niche areas where it feels it can better differentiate.We are focusing our phone efforts where we have differentiation — with enterprises that value security, manageability and our Continuum capability, and consumers who value the same, said Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft, in a statement.The feature phone business that it sold to a Foxconn-led consortium last week was never the primary interest for Microsoft, so it seemed like a very obvious move to finally pass it on to a group that was more interested in developing it and getting out what it could from the lower end of the market that is still buying these devices which, interestingly, is still a pretty sizeable volume, if much lower value overall .It was partly because it was too late to enter the market with something that was effectively not a big enough iteration on what was already on offer.Remember all those missing apps that Microsoft had to work so hard to bring to its Windows mobile operating system?There was also an internal memo from devices EVP Terry Myerson that it looks like Microsoft has been sharing with symphathetic journalists, reiterating the news and trying to shore up staff morale around it.
The last remaining vestiges of Nokia at Microsoft are being closed down as the company "streamlines" its smartphone hardware business.CEO Satya Nadella insists that the company is still working in the phone space, but in a much narrower way, saying "We are focusing our phone efforts where we have differentiation—with enterprises that value security, manageability and our Continuum capability, and consumers who value the same."But last year's layoffs and drastic scaling back of smartphone ambitions, coming just weeks before Windows 10's consumer release, undermined the entire value proposition.That viability seemed within reach, too, with Windows Phone 8 breaking 10 percent market share in a number of European countries.The ability to use a Windows phone with a screen, mouse, and keyboard for enhanced productivity, a tantalizing glimpse of a possible future, is also appealing to enterprises.Yet our phone success has been limited to companies valuing our commitment to security, manageability, and Continuum, and with consumers who value the same.
The American tech company is cutting nearly 2,000 jobs, it announced on Wednesday — 1,350 from Finland as it ceases phone design and production in the country.The Finland layoffs were reported earlier by the Finnish press.After years of partnership, Microsoft acquired Nokia's smartphone business in 2014, giving it a presence in the country.Then-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said ahead of the acquisition that Finland would become the "hub and the centre for our phone R"But Microsoft's phone business has struggled to eat into the market share of the major players Google and Apple, and it has since moved away from the Nokia brand — selling off its feature phone business earlier this month.According to research from Gartner, Microsoft now accounts for less than 1% of the global smartphone business — down markedly on last year.Microsoft exec Terry Myerson informed employees of the layoffs in an email seen by The New York Times, saying the company needs "to be more focused in our phone hardware efforts."There will be up to 1,850 layoffs in total.In a statement, CEO Satya Nadella said: "We are focusing our phone efforts where we have differentiation — with enterprises that value security, manageability and our Continuum capability, and consumers who value the same ... We will continue to innovate across devices and on our cloud services across all mobile platforms."As The New York Times, points out, this is just the latest in a line of cuts targetting its smartphone business.In 2014, it laid off 18,000 people, followed by another 7,800 the following year.
Now, in another twist, PC World discovered that trying to close the newly redesigned pop-up for the programme – by clicking on the red cross icon on the upper right hand side of the box - is considered as consent for the Windows 10 upgrade.The download is now categorised as a "recommended update" by Microsoft which means that PCs configured to accept recommended updates by default will have it installed even if the box is closed.This has understandably caused frustration and confusion amongst Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 users with even the staunchest Windows fans finding it hard to defend Microsoft's latest move.Its CEO, Satya Nadella, has committed to get one billion devices running the OS by April 2018 and given the current state of Windows 10 Mobile, such tactics may help Microsoft achieve that target.The scheduling UI that customers are seeing began on February 1st 2016, and has evolved over time based on customer feedback.Once a customer's upgrade is scheduled, they will receive a notification that states the time their upgrade is scheduled for, with options to reschedule or cancel if they wish.
Photograph: Alamy The US IT giant Microsoft to streamline the already fierce stripped-down mobile phone business, which the company bought from the Nokia 2014. Total affected 1850 employees of the cutbacks, according to a press release from Microsoft expected to result in one-time costs of approximately $ 950 million, equivalent to almost eight billion. According to Microsoft boss Satya Nadella Nokia will not leave the mobile phone market altogether. Previously, the Finnish newspaper Aaumulehti reported that Microsoft has called its employees in the mobile phone business in Finland to an information meeting in Espoo at lunchtime. And last week told Microsoft that the company sells its activities in simpler handsets, so-called feature phones, to Taiwanese Foxconn and the newly established Finnish company HMD. HMD get exclusive rights to manufacture mobile phones and tablets with the Nokia mark the next ten years and plans to invest more than $ 500 million, over four billion, over three years.
The move all but signaled Microsoft s departure from the mobile device business and now, the final blow – at least with regard to Microsoft s disastrous purchase of Nokia – has been dealt.Satya Nadella, chief executive officer of Microsoft, said in a statement that they are focusing their phone efforts where they have differentiation — with enterprises that value security, manageability and their Continuum capability and consumers who value the same.The writing has been on the wall for quite a while now.Microsoft, then under the leadership of Steve Ballmer, purchased Nokia s mobile division for roughly $7.2 billion in late 2013 but has been unable to generate any respectable market share with its Lumia brand.It s not so much that Lumia phones were bad – Microsoft, like Blackberry, was simply too late to the game.By the time these companies got serious about smartphones, companies like Apple, Samsung, HTC and LG had already established solid roots within the industry and with consumers.
New York AP -- Microsoft said Wednesday it will cut up to 1,850 jobs and take a $950 million hit to its books as it attempts to salvage its rocky entrance into the smartphone market.The company acquired Nokia's phone business in 2014 for $7.3 billion, hoping to expand its share of the fast-growing mobile tech industry.But by last summer it had slashed the value of that business severely and eliminated 26,000 jobs.Under former CEO Steve Ballmer, Microsoft struggled to compete in a mobile sector dominated by rivals Apple, Google and Samsung.But after it failed to gain traction with the Nokia venture, new CEO Satya Nadella has pursued a different strategy.Nadella has been pushing Microsoft to make its flagship Windows operating system and other popular software programs work on a variety of devices.The company is still producing a limited line of smartphones, aimed at consumers and businesses whose employees already use Microsoft programs on their work computers.But that phone business is drastically pared back from two years ago.Microsoft last week sold its lower-end mobile phone business to a Chinese company.It said the bulk of the job cuts announced Wednesday, up to 1,350 positions, will affect a mobile technology division in Finland, where Nokia is based.There will also be up to 500 additional jobs trimmed worldwide.Microsoft had 117,354 employees globally at the end of its last fiscal year.Microsoft Corp., based in Redmond, Washington, said it hopes to complete most of the "streamlining" by year's end.The company's stock was up more than 1.5 percent after the announcement Wednesday.
Latest retreat from the mobile market will cost Microsoft around £650mMicrosoft is set to announce major job cuts across its troubled smartphone business as the company looks continues its reinvention following the departure of former CEO Steve Ballmer, who masterminded the Nokia acquistion.Around 1,850 jobs are set to be lost as Microsoft in a move that will cost the company around $950 million £648m , including $200 million £136.44 in severance payoffs.Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said that the move will allow the company to focus its phone efforts on where it has differentiation — with enterprises that value security, manageability and our Continuum capability, and consumers who value the same.All changeThe cuts will see up to 1,350 jobs will go at Microsoft Mobile in Finland, with another 500 jobs going at other locations across the world.The news is the latest story of a sorry saga that began with Microsoft s £4.6 billion takeover of Nokia s smartphone business back in 2014.According to Kantar Worldpanel, Windows accounts for 6.2 percent of the UK smartphone market and 4.9 percent of sales in Europe s five biggest countries.
Microsoft has revealed its latest attempt to sort out the internal mess of its mobile phone ecosystem, an effort it calls a "streamlining of smartphone hardware business" -- the sacking loads of people it doesn't need any more now the Nokia dream has all gone to pieces.Sadly for Nokia's historical ties with its home country, the majority of job losses are slated to hit within Finland.The company says that a staggering 1,350 jobs at Microsoft Mobile Oy in Finland are to go thanks to the lopping off of redundant heads, along with another 500 related workers across the world.In classic Microsoft style it's also announced a huge financial impairment alongside the job losses, with this one banking a offsettable loss of $950m; with a $200m chunk of that alone being used to pay off the sacked staff.Company boss Satya Nadella typed out a few words while working his way through a stack of "Not Really All That Sorry You're Leaving" cards, saying: "We are focusing our phone efforts where we have differentiation -- with enterprises that value security, manageability and our Continuum capability, and consumers who value the same."Make sure to check out our @GizmodoUK Twitter feed, and our Facebook page.
Nokia is now set to re-enter the phone and tablet markets, as Microsoft adds these layoffs to 7,800 jobs it cut from its phone division in 2015; the $950 which includes $200 in severance pay write-off comes a year after the company wrote off $7.6bn after its plans to capitalise on the Nokia name failed.This "streamlining" comes a week after Microsoft announced it will be selling its feature phone business to FIH Mobile, a subsidiary of Chinese company Foxconn, for $350m.Most of the latest cuts will affect jobs in Finland, including staff Microsoft inherited through its acquisition of Nokia.The buy-out saw 25,000 Nokia staffers switch to Microsoft, but once this latest round of cuts has taken effect, the majority will no longer work for the US company."We are focusing our phone efforts where we have differentiation — with enterprises that value security, manageability and our Continuum capability, and consumers who value the same," said Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella.Rumours that Microsoft is working on a 'Surface Phone' could still be true, but this latest news must surely reduce the hope that Microsoft can truly take on Apple and Samsung.
Microsoft has revealed its latest attempt to sort out the internal mess of its mobile phone ecosystem, an effort it calls a "streamlining of smartphone hardware business" -- the sacking loads of people it doesn't need any more now the Nokia dream has all gone to pieces.Sadly for Nokia's historical ties with its home country, the majority of job losses are slated to hit within Finland.The company says that a staggering 1,350 jobs at Microsoft Mobile Oy in Finland are to go thanks to the lopping off of redundant heads, along with another 500 related workers across the world.In classic Microsoft style it's also announced a huge financial impairment alongside the job losses, with this one banking a offsettable loss of $950m; with a $200m chunk of that alone being used to pay off the sacked staff.Company boss Satya Nadella typed out a few words while working his way through a stack of "Not Really All That Sorry You're Leaving" cards, saying: "We are focusing our phone efforts where we have differentiation -- with enterprises that value security, manageability and our Continuum capability, and consumers who value the same."Make sure to check out our @GizmodoUK Twitter feed, and our Facebook page.
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