In early 2016, Campbell Ewald became embroiled in controversy after a white staffer at the agency's San Antonio office sent an email in October 2015 inviting colleagues to participate in what was termed "Ghetto Day." The racist internal communication caught up to the agency with CEO Jim Palmer being terminated, handing the leadership reins to...
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The rapid exodus of clients from The Richards Group in recent days has created painful uncertainty about the agency's future and the fate of its 700 employees. But in the brutally competitive world of advertising, the fallout means there's also a number of sizable accounts suddenly up for grabs. This week, Motel 6 ended its...
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Welcome to First Things First, Adweek's daily resource for marketers. We'll be publishing the content to First Things First on Adweek.com each morning (like this post), but if you prefer that it come straight to your inbox, you can sign up for the email here. Stan Richards Departs the Agency He Founded After Fallout Over...
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Stan Richards, who founded The Richards Group 44 years ago in Dallas, is leaving the agency amid a cloud of controversy and multiple key client departures. Glenn Dady, who joined The Richards Group in 1980, will assume full responsibility for all agency operations, according to an announcement sent to Adweek by The Richards Group this...
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Keurig Dr Pepper, The Salvation Army and H-E-B, a grocery store chain in Texas, have ended their relationships with The Richards Group. Their decisions come days after Motel 6, one of the agency's longtime clients, fired The Richards Group upon learning that its founder, Stan Richards, called an ad concept for the hotel chain "too...
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Soap veteran Paula Tilbrook has died at the age of 89.The actor was best known for her portrayal of gossiping neighbour Betty Eagleton in Emmerdale, a role she held for more than 20 years.The news of Paula’s death was first reported by The Stage on Wednesday, although she actually died in December 2019.Digital Spy also shared a statement from “those close to [Paula]”, which noted that she “died of natural causes a few months ago at home with her loved ones beside her”.An Emmerdale spokesperson told HuffPost UK: ”’We are saddened to hear of the passing of our much loved colleague, Paula Tilbrook. Paula was at the heart of Emmerdale for many years and she will be greatly missed by all who worked with her and by the fans of her character, Betty.“We have lost a great talent and a wonderful friend but she will forever live in the memories of those lucky enough to have known her.”Paula first began playing her signature character in 1994, and bowed out of the soap in May 2015.However, she did briefly appear in one episode at the end of that year, addressing the Emmerdale villagers in a Christmas Day Skype message.As well as her popular Emmerdale character, Paula played multiple roles in Coronation Street in the late 1970s and early 1980s.In 1991, she returned to Corrie, playing Alf Roberts’ friend Vivian Barford, and made her final appearance in 1993, the year before she became a staple in Emmerdale.She also played Betty Hughes in Brookside between 1984 and 1985.Paula’s other acting credits included playing Mrs Tattersall in Open All Hours, Flo Capp in the sitcom based on the cartoon strip Andy Capp and three different roles in Last Of The Summer Wine.Her final on-screen appearance was in 2016, when she was a guest on a Coronation Street vs. Emmerdale special of the ITV game show The Big Quiz, which featured her former co-stars Mark Charnock, Charlotte Bellamy, Liam Fox and Samantha Giles.
You could pay Gwyneth Paltrow or Angelina Jolie millions of dollars to represent your company.But if you don't have the budget of Estee Lauder or St. John, some creativity and a four-legged friend could take your business far.Whether furry, scaly or feathered, animals can be particularly effective company icons."It's easier to involve yourself in the ads because most of us like animals," says Stan Richards, founder of Dallas-based The Richards Group, the agency that came up with the Chick-fil-A cows campaign.Just think of the number of Super Bowl ads every year featuring animals, all seeking to catch the attention of ad-weary viewers.Even for companies that don't advertise on TV, animals still hold plenty of marketing power.
Although many brands have tapped into the millennial generation - those that first 'came of age' around the time of the new century in the age range from 18 to 34 - researchers were surprised at the expectations amongst white, black, hispanic and asian millennials, finding minority segments more positive about their future and the American dream than the white majority.In a unique collaboration within the advertising industry, Richards/Lerma joined forces with The University of Texas at Austin, Stan Richards School of Advertising & Public Relations to decode the generation set to define the future of our nation and found their assumptions to be wrong.The report surprised researchers who noted that after interviewing, listening, and studying 1,000 millennials, their assumptions were counterintuitive.Minorities in the US are far more optimistic than the majority in this generation.Researchers expected to uncover hints of despair, apathy, and hopelessness amongst some black millennials, they found that to be completely untrue.Instead the study uncovered that young African Americans are the most optimistic segment with a heightened sense of control over their future.
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