The European Union, locked in a tax battle with the likes of Apple Inc. and McDonald s Corp., laid down the law in its bid to rein in governments that woo multinationals with special fiscal deals allowing them to reduce their fiscal liability by booking profits abroad.The European Commission, which can ban unfair tax advantages conferred to companies, outlined measures cutting member states ability to make rulings that lower the tax burden of foreign businesses.Thursday s publication, which sets out how the regulator will police state aid, sends a warning shot to corporations shifting profits, insisting that such transactions between subsidiaries should be based on market prices.Any deviation from the best estimate of a market-based outcome must be limited and proportionate, the document states.This applies to situations where there aren t any good comparable transactions in the real world given that profit-shifting can involve remunerating hard-to-quantify intellectual property rights held in a low-taxation country.The EU already showed its resolve last year when it ordered Starbucks Corp. to pay as much as 30 million euros $33 million in back taxes.The commission said a Dutch unit paid millions of euros to a U.K.-based arm of the company that isn t taxed in Britain in exchange for a technique to roast coffee beans.Exaggerated tax-deductible royalty payments for this technique allowed Seattle-based Starbucks to unfairly lower its Dutch taxes, it said.The new rules beef up the regulator s powers to limit the type of deals it s probing in Ireland concerning Apple and Luxembourg s arrangements with companies such as Amazon.com Inc. and McDonald s.The iPhone maker s tax agreements with Ireland were criticized as unfair by EU regulators who said the deals were improperly designed to give Apple a financial boost in exchange for jobs in the country.The methods used to determine profit allocation to two Irish units result from a negotiation rather than a pricing methodology, the EU regulator said at the time.All the companies and countries targeted by the EU have denied they broke any rules, raising the prospect of protracted legal challenges.Multinationals should stick with the guidance provided by the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development on the arm s length principle in order to determine how to allocate profits, according to the EU rules.The OECD s guidelines on the matter capture the international consensus on a principle which is meant to ensure that, for tax purposes, transactions between subsidiaries are based on prices an unrelated company would pay, according to the rules.The OECD says such profit shifting costs the world as much as $240 billion a year in lost revenue.
Many minerals can be recovered from old dumps on landfill tax designed more sustainably, according to the debaters. EPA counteracts the remediation of old landfills, which would provide substantial environmental gains. The extraction of natural resources from landfills is a way to save the earth's resources and while taking care of the environmental debt that all of these contaminated sites means. Research shows that integrated recycling and remediation of landfills would have major environmental and social benefits, from global to local level. Tax Agency concludes instead that a tax exemption is not possible because it constitutes State aid for environmental protection, which may not be provided to companies in difficulties which are these? Joakim Krook, Associate Professor Environmental Technology, Linköping University Mats Eklund, Professor Environmental Technology, Linköping University Bjorn Wallsten, postdoctoral Technology and Social Change, Linköping University Nils Johansson, PhD Environmental Technology, Linköping University Niclas Svensson, lecturer Environmental Technology, Linköping University Stefan Anderberg, Professor of Industrial Ecology, Linköping University comments Welcome to have your say on new technologies.
Many of the minerals can be recovered from the old dumps on the deponiskatten be designed more sustainably, according to the debaters.the environmental protection agency discourage the remediation of the old landfill, which would provide significant environmental benefits.To extract natural resources from landfills is a way to save the earth's resources and at the same time take care of the environmental debt which all these polluted places.Research shows that integrated recovery and remediation of the landfills would provide major environmental and social benefits, from the global to the local level.the Swedish Tax agency's conclusion is that, instead of a tax exemption is not possible as it constitutes state aid for environmental protection, which shall be submitted to the company which is in difficulties, what are these?Joakim Krook, assistant professor environmental technology and management, Linköping university, swedenMats Eklund, professor in industrial environmental technology, Linköping university, swedenBjörn Wallsten, postdoc department of technology and social change, Linköping university, swedenNils Johansson, phd student industrial engineering, Linköping university,Niclas Svensson, associate professor environmental technology and management, Linköping university, swedenStefan Anderberg, professor of industrial ecology, Linköping universityCommentsWelcome to say your opinion on the New Technology.
photographer: Pixabay The production of solar electricity and solar on our roofs can provide a total of 20 terawatt hours of energy a year - 2050. The consultants will until its investigation is that 132 million square meters of roof space can be used for solar cells, and 82, 5 million square meters of solar panels. And then figured out sloped to the north, which has the wrong slope, and some obstructions like chimneys, balconies and other things, and seen that there is a good expansion potential, says Ms Wahlstrom, President of CIT Energy Management and responsible for the study. - We compared our results with the case and concluded that it is entirely possible. - It is important information Energy Agency proposing and designing instruments. When it comes to getting the economy in the transition to solar energy says Jan-Olof Dalenbäck, Professor of Building Technology at Chalmers, the state aid is still needed because of the Swedish low price of electricity.
Freeing återdeponerat waste from the tax calculated by the EU as aid. And to investigate a completely new mechanism for defining waste tax to be levied was not in the government's behalf, writes Lena Hiort af Ornäs Leijon the Tax Agency. This is one case of companies that have declared bankruptcy and the company is in serious financial difficulties. The Environmental Protection Agency's letter is a detailed account of this conclusion. The European Commission, however, concluded that the exemption applies to these residues do not constitute state aid. Lena Hiort af Ornäs Leijon, section chief creditor and Excise Tax Agency Legal
The European Commission may deliver its verdict on Apple Inc. s tax arrangements in Ireland as soon as next month, according to Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan, offering the first clues to a firm timeline for a decision.European authorities opened the probe in 2014, and in preliminary findings, said Apple s tax arrangements were improperly designed to give the company a financial boost in exchange for jobs in Ireland.The speculation now is that the commission may make a decision sometime in July, Noonan said in an interview in Luxembourg on Thursday.It s the general feel around Brussels that they re walking toward a July decision.Ireland will fight any negative commission decision to the EU courts, Noonan said.The government will vigorously defend any adverse Apple tax decision, he has said previously.The EU has gathered information on hundreds of companies and their agreements with national authorities as part of a clampdown on sweetheart tax deals that may be illegal state aid.
While Europe and global financial markets are consumed by the prospect of Brexit, business rolls on in Brussels.Near the top of the agenda for investors continues to be the European Commission s probe into Apple Inc. s tax arrangements in Ireland, with both the company and the Irish authorities bracing for a decision that the Irish provided the iPhone maker with illegal state aid through a sweetheart deal.In the first clues to a firm timeline for a decision on a probe which opened in 2014, Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan told Bloomberg on Thursday in Luxembourg that the commission may publish a decision sometime in July, though we don t know that with certainty.In a worst-case scenario, Apple may face a $19 billion bill if the government ultimately loses and is forced to recoup tax from the company, according to JPMorgan Chase & Co. analyst Rod Hall.Matt Larson of Bloomberg Intelligence puts the figure at more than $8 billion.Brussels lawyers speculate that the final amount could be much less, in the hundreds of millions range -- large enough to send a message to companies like Apple and the countries that dole out tax breaks, but not too large to risk creating havoc in case the decisions get overturned in the EU courts.The reality is that, nobody knows for sure, and it s worth noting that the repayment orders in other state aid cases have been relatively small.There s a bigger picture, here, according to briefing notes provided to the incoming finance minister last month; a negative decision would hurt the country s reputation and create uncertainty around it s tax offering, which has been a key factor in drawing companies like Alphabet Inc. s Google and Facebook Inc. to Dublin.Absolutely not.Given that Apple employs about 5,500 people in Ireland and the nation is so reliant on U.S. investment, the government can ill-afford not to be seen to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with Apple.One caveat though: Prime Minister Enda Kenny lost his majority in February s election and is now much more exposed to attacks from a stronger left, which believe companies like Apple should pay more tax.Ireland could be sitting on the cash for several years, according to the briefing notes, indicating that the money will move from Apple s bank account to Ireland s while lawyers make millions arguing over the decision.
BDUK Chris Townsend says small business broadband remains a priority but there are no plans to allocate more money to super connected cities schemeThe CEO of Broadband Delivery UK BDUK has insisted that delivering better broadband to small businesses is a priority but said there are no plans to extend the Super Connected Cities voucher scheme that was suspended last year.BDUK is forbidden from intervening in urban areas due to EU state aid restrictions and the voucher scheme, which offered grants of up to £3,000 for the installation of superfast broadband, helped 55,000 SMBs in broadband notspots .SMB BroadbandBirmingham Shutterstock Feraru NicolaeHowever given that SMBs account for 99.9 percent of the 1.3 million employing firms in the UK, according to the Federation of Small Businesses FSB it was suggested at a Westminster eForum that many small and medium businesses have been left out.But with all the work with local bodies and devolved governments we re doing all we can to target business parks and other areas.One of the most amazing facts I ve learned in my travels is the amount of employment that comes through SMBs.However following legal challenges from ISPs, this was watered down to a voucher scheme, although the Wi-Fi aspect has remained unaffected, with BT and Virgin Media building wireless infrastructure for city councils.
View photosMoreGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel, State Premier of Bavaria, Horst Seehofer and Winfried Kretschmann of Baden-Wuerttemberg attend a meeting with the heads of government of the federal states at the chancellery in Berlin, Germany, June 16, 2016.REUTERS/Hannibal HanschkeBERLIN Reuters - The production of computer chips and batteries in Europe should be excluded from EU rules on state aid, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Tuesday.Speaking at an economics conference in Berlin, Merkel said such a move was necessary to ensure Europe did not cede its leading global position in making machines for chip production."We need to have certain capabilities in Europe," she said, alluding to competition from the United States and China.Merkel said she considered battery technology a strategic investment that should be excluded from the state aid rules.Germany's biggest carmaker Volkswagen has said it will invest billions of euros in electric cars and is considering whether to develop a dedicated battery factory in Germany.
At issue is a delicate political balance in the EU over tech policy between countries, including the U.K. and Nordic and Baltic countries, that favor lighter regulation and others, led by France and Germany, that argue the rise of big global technology firms necessitates new rules to help level the playing field.While most big U.S. tech firms have declined to comment on the vote, some executives acknowledge privately that if the U.K. were to remove or lighten some EU restrictions on, for instance, the use of personal data or corporate tax rules, it might help their U.K. operations.In the case of Brexit, I would be worried about the direction of European technology policy, said Dan Rogers, co-founder of Peakon, a Danish startup that offers employee-analytics platforms to businesses.Without the U.K., it will be very complex I think.Officials in France and Germany, for their part, say that regulatory proposals they have made to rein in big Internet platforms are aimed at giving smaller businesses more of a shot to compete against a new class of gatekeepers.The body s executive arm has alleged that Apple Inc. and Amazon.com Inc., struck sweetheart deals respectively with Ireland and Luxembourg that violate so-called state-aid rules—allegations the countries and the companies deny.
U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew is set to meet with the European Union s antitrust chief Margrethe Vestager this week as she prepares to deliver a final decision on a probe into Apple Inc. s tax affairs in Ireland.The meeting with Lew, who has criticized the European Commission tax investigations, comes amid mounting speculation that the authority will rule as soon as this month in the case -- one of a raft of investigations into whether multinational companies don t pay their fair share of taxes.Vestager has repeatedly denied she s deliberately taking aim at U.S. firms, insisting that probes into tax rulings are part of the watchdog s responsibility to police fair competition within the EU.Clawing back undue advantages -- as was the case when Starbucks Corp. was ordered to pay as much as 30 million euros $33 million in back taxes to the Netherlands -- simply restores equal treatment, she insists.The commission s press office didn t comment beyond confirming the Brussels meeting on Wednesday.Spokespeople for Apple and the U.S. Treasury Department didn t have an immediate comment.Conflict over trans-Atlantic tax practices escalated in February as Lew complained to commission President Jean-Claude Juncker that U.S. firms are unfair targets of state-aid investigations.The Treasury Secretary s letter came after EU enforcement focused on fiscal pacts Apple, Amazon.com Inc. and McDonald s Corp. have with Ireland and Luxembourg.The companies all say they acted within the law.The EU opened the Apple probe in 2014, and, in preliminary findings, said its tax arrangements were improperly designed to give the company a financial boost in exchange for jobs in Ireland.The government has said it will vigorously defend any adverse Apple tax decision, while the company has denied any wrong-doing.Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan said last month the EU decision could come as soon as July, though he also suggested that the U.K. vote to quit the EU may trigger delays.
U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew is set to meet with European Union antitrust chief Margrethe Vestager as she prepares to deliver a final verdict on a probe into Apple Inc. s tax affairs in Ireland.The showdown comes days after Vestager s team delivered two draft decisions setting out possible scenarios for how much tax Apple owes in Ireland, according to two people familiar with the case, who asked not to be identified because the matter is private.Lew has contacted Vestager urging her to avoid ordering any collection of back taxes from Apple, according to one of the people.Conflict over trans-Atlantic tax practices escalated in February as Lew complained to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker that U.S. firms are unfair targets of state-aid investigations.The Treasury Secretary s letter came after EU enforcement focused on fiscal pacts Apple, Amazon.com Inc. and McDonald s Corp. have with Ireland and Luxembourg.The companies all say they acted within the law.Vestager has repeatedly denied she s deliberately taking aim at U.S. firms, insisting that probes into tax rulings are part of the watchdog s responsibility to police fair competition within the EU.Clawing back undue advantages -- as was the case when Starbucks Corp. was ordered to pay as much as 30 million euros $33 million in back taxes to the Netherlands -- simply restores equal treatment, she insists.The commission s press office and the Treasury Department didn t comment beyond confirming the Brussels meeting.Apple declined to comment.The EU opened the Apple probe in 2014, and, in preliminary findings, said its tax arrangements were improperly designed to give the company a financial boost in exchange for jobs in Ireland.
BRUSSELS—Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan on Wednesday said he expected the European Union s top antitrust regulator to rule in the fall on the long-running probe into Apple Inc. s tax arrangements with Ireland.At a press conference in Ireland on Wednesday, Mr. Noonan said following his meeting with EU antitrust chief Margrethe Vestager, he now expects the decision to come in September or October, according to a spokesman for Ireland s embassy to the EU.Mr. Noonan met with Ms. Vestager in Brussels on Tuesday.Mr. Noonan said he still has no indication of what the decision would be, the spokesman said.The EU could order Ireland to retrieve substantial sums from Apple in unpaid taxes.The European Commission, the bloc s antitrust agency, opened a formal probe into Apple s tax arrangements more than two years ago, accusing Ireland that the deals it struck with the U.S. tech company in 1991 and 2007 amounted to state aid.
Vattenfall's open-pit mining of lignite in Germany.Vattenfall's planned brunkolsförsäljning in Germany have encountered problems.Vattenfall's sale of brunkolsverksamheten in Germany may be delayed.the EUROPEAN commission has opened a complaint file ago a competing company argued that the business case is contrary to EU rules on state aid, reports the SVT News.It is the company LMMG, who wanted to put in a bid but was not in the final stages of the deal, which is behind the notification.State Waterfall added around 15 billion in the coffers of the subsidiary to get through the deal.
The U.S. Treasury Department released a sharp critique of the European Commission s investigation of corporate tax breaks as EU officials near the end of their inquiry into Apple Inc. s arrangements with Ireland.In a 25-page paper released Wednesday, the Treasury elaborated on arguments it has been making all year.The U.S. contends that the EU has made an unforeseeable departure from the status quo and is acting inconsistent with international tax norms.The Commission is charting a course that sets aside years of multilateral efforts on tax avoidance, Treasury wrote.The Commission s path runs the risk of the EU being perceived as having used its unique structure to undermine and reverse international progress.EU officials have said repeatedly that they are merely following their own laws against unfair competition, which require them to recover improper state aid to companies in the form of selective tax breaks provided by EU member countries.
The U.S. is stepping up its effort to convince the European Commission to refrain from hitting Apple Inc. and other companies with demands for possibly billions of euros in underpaid taxes.In a white paper released Wednesday, the Treasury Department in Washington said the Brussels-based commission is taking on the role of a supra-national tax authority that has the scope to threaten global tax reform deals.This shift in approach appears to expand the role of the commission s Directorate-General for Competition that goes beyond enforcement of competition and state aid law, the Treasury wrote in the paper.The cases cited by the commission do not give taxpayers prior notice that the commission would interpret its powers in this way or that selectivity would no longer be a meaningful precondition to a finding of state aid.When such benefits have nonetheless been granted, the member state concerned must recover the unfair advantage, according to the statement.The commission has initiated investigations into tax rulings that Apple, Starbucks Corp., Amazon.com Inc. and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV.U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew has written previously that the investigations appear to be targeting U.S. companies disproportionately.Treasury officials are concerned that if European authorities hit U.S. companies with major repayments, they ll reduce potential tax collections in the U.S., the white paper said.
The US Treasury is preparing a pre-emptive strike against a long-awaited probe by the European Commission into Ireland's tax arrangements with tech firms such as Apple.The US Department of the Treasury plans to publish a paper today outlining its views on the EU s investigations into tax arrangements, sources told The Irish Times, which was first to break news of the fightback.In a white paper commissioned by Treasury secretary Jack Lew and seen by the Financial Times, the Treasury says the probe amounts to a power grab.This shift in approach appears to expand the role of the competition directorate beyond enforcement of competition and state aid law .into that of a supranational tax authority that reviews member state decisions on corporate tax, it says.The European Commission is currently investigating allegations that the Emerald Isle cut a sweetheart deal with Apple, claiming the arrangement amounts to "state aid".
The European Commission is investigating agreements between Apple and IrelandThe US has launched a stinging attack on Brussels tax investigations into Apple and other companies in an escalation of the transatlantic battle over alleged EU targeting of US multinationals.In a last-ditch shot before Brussels announces the results of its lengthy investigation into Apple s Irish tax affairs, the US Treasury accused the European Commission of trying to become a supranational tax authority .It claimed the EU s attempts to reclaim tax from US companies threatened to undermine global attempts to reform tax rules, creating an unfortunate international tax policy precedent .The attack is the latest sign of growing tensions over European treatment of US companies, which has seen it accuse the likes of Google and Microsoft of abusing their dominance.Brussels is now believed to be close to announcing the results of its three-year investigation into whether agreements struck between Apple and Irish tax authorities in 1991 and 2007 constitute illegal state aid.
Apple's battle with the European Union s competition watchdog has been backed by the US government, which on Wednesday waded into the complaint over the iPhone maker's tax arrangements.The US treasury warned in a white paper that Brussels' ongoing investigation into Apple s tax deal with Ireland could create an unfortunate international tax policy precedent.On Thursday, the European Commission responded that there was no bias against US companies.After two years of investigations, antitrust chief Margrethe Vestager is expected to issue a decision on allegations of tax dodging by Apple in the autumn.The commission is considering whether the company used so-called transfer pricing arrangements to move profits around in order to avoid tax.Ireland is implicated in letting Apple pay a tiny amount of tax.
News: The European Commission is preparing to rule on whether Apple's Ireland tax deal violated EU rules.The US Treasury has issued an implicit warning to EU tax authorities over its State aid investigations that could have major implications for tech giants such as Google.In a new white paper, the Treasury claimed that the European Commission s investigations risked turning it into a supra-national tax authority .While stating that multinational tax avoidance is a serious concern for the US, the Treasury stated that initiatives such as the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting BEPS project were being undermined by EU activities.The Treasury is apparently considering potential responses if the Commission continues.The intervention by the US Treasury comes as the Commission prepares to rule on whether Ireland s tax deals with Apple amounted to state aid, which may lead to it demanding as much as $19 billion from Apple in alleged unpaid taxes.
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