News: A French court fined Uber €800,000 for running illegal taxi service.Uber has suffered legal setbacks in France and Germany after court rulings in both the countries went against the ride-sharing company.A French court has fined Uber €800,000 for running an illegal transport service with non-professional drivers.The court also fined two of the company's executives a combined amount of €50,000.A company executive said: "We stopped UberPop last summer and we are disappointed by this judgment.Earlier this year, Uber agreed to pay as much as $25m in a bid to settle a lawsuit filed by the cities of Los Angeles and San Francisco over insufficient driver's background checks.
So it makes sense that instead of parting with cash to buy language dictionaries and tourist guide books, we would rather download a selection of helpful apps and save space in our suitcases before we go away on holiday.And here are a selection of travel apps that will make life easier and take the stress out of all that planning and preparation.GoEuroView photos MoreTrying to make travel arrangements at the very last minute can be difficult and stressful.The app has over 46,000 routes mapped out and partners include National Express, Eurostar and EasyJet.HailoHailo allows you to book a taxi by letting you set a pick-up location and select a car of your choice.You can even get a quote estimation for how much your ride is going to cost.
The Swedish debate on übers controversial service Uber Pop appears to be a storm in a teacup compared to what it has looked like in France. Their criticism is to Uber competing on unfair terms and may make it impossible to make a living as traditional taxi driver. According to The Guardian, the process was the first ever where übers managers, rather than the company itself, have been brought to justice. Their fines learn all probability paid by the company. The prosecutor demanded that Ubercheferna would be disqualifications. Uber think, even though the core issue in the legal case is utagerad, appeal.
Currently only a few apps support it, alerting you to the CVS Pharmacy photo printing app when you're in-store or the United Airlines in-flight entertainment app while you wait to board a flight for example.Discounts at your favorite storesEveryone loves a bargain and shops could leverage that with Nearby to get more customers and more users for their apps.Taxi apps in a new townUber and Lyft are great, but they're not available everywhere.Translation apps when you landSimilarly, if you land in a foreign country chances are you won't speak the language and if you forgot to pack a phrasebook or learn some key lingo, Nearby could ensure you're able to communicate by suggesting a relevant language app.Guides to museums and monumentsMany museums have their own apps to help guide you around exhibits and teach you more about what you're seeing.And it doesn't have to be limited to museums.
View photosMoreA woman walks past the logo of Line Corp at the company's headquarters in Tokyo, Japan June 2, 2016.REUTERS/Toru Hanai/File PhotoTOKYO Reuters - Line Corp IPO-LINE.T on Friday said it plans to list shares in Tokyo and New York next month through an initial public offering IPO that would value the Japanese messaging app operator at 588 billion yen $5.50 billion .Its free-of-charge app generates revenue through sales of electronic stickers and tokens for in-app games, as well as services such as music streaming and taxi hailing.But while the IPO proceeds could help bolster an international push, the Line app is eclipsed in major Western markets by Facebook Inc's Messenger and Whatsapp, while China is dominated by Tencent Holdings Ltd's WeChat.Naver's ownership will fall to as low as 80.8 percent.The company hired Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan and Nomura to manage the IPO.
A man passed a Line logo at the company's headquarters in Tokyo earlier this month....TOKYO—Messaging-application operator Line Corp. is planning a dual listing in Tokyo and New York in July, in what is expected to be one of the biggest initial public offerings in Japan this year.Owned by South Korea s Naver Corp. 035420 0.00 % , Line operates Japan s most popular mobile messaging app.In recent years, it has expanded to provide other services including streaming music and taxi hailing.Line s monthly active users totaled 218 million at the end of March, with more than half coming from four countries: Japan, Taiwan, Thailand and Indonesia.Line Chief Executive Takeshi Idezawa has said that the company planned to concentrate efforts in Asia and other markets where it can become the clear market leader.The indicative price of 2,800 yen set by Line would value the offering at ¥98 billion $914 million .
REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson/Files Reuters - Former Uber Technologies Inc and Lyft Inc drivers in Austin, Texas, on Thursday accused the ride-hailing companies of breaking a federal law by abruptly halting operations in the city after voters backed a measure requiring them to fingerprint drivers.The companies suspended services in Austin on May 9, two days after residents voted to keep the city's law requiring Uber and Lyft, just like taxi companies, to conduct fingerprint-based background checks of their drivers.The companies consider drivers to be independent contractors, and Thursday's lawsuits are the latest to claim they are actually employees under various federal and state laws because of the degree of control Uber and Lyft exert.The lawsuits said the named plaintiffs, who are seeking to represent classes of Uber and Lyft drivers from Austin, have been unable to make up for the loss of income.In April, Uber agreed to pay up to $100 million to 350,000 drivers in California and Massachusetts to settle claims that it owed them reimbursement for gas and mileage and withheld tips.Lyft has proposed a $27 million settlement of a similar case involving California drivers.
Gone are the days when you needed to call a taxi company in advance or face hundreds of others waiting for a taxi after getting off a flight.People going in generally the same direction could take the same car, cutting down the cost of your ride while ultimately making the driver the same amount of money, if not a little more.This is generally aimed at ensuring that everything was safe and worked smoothly.On the flipside, you're able to see a driver's rating when you're matched up with them and before you get in the car.As the name suggests, UberXL will get you a slightly larger car, with at least 6 seats.It's generally accepted that Uber is a little cheaper than Lyft, largely because Uber is trying much more aggressively to cut the competition out of the market.
Photograph: Geoffroy van der Hasselt/AFP/Getty ImagesUber s assault on the European market has run into fresh legal roadblocks, after court rulings in France and Germany went against the company.The Frankfurt ruling means Uber can be fined for violation of local transport laws if it uses drivers who are not licensed by the state in order to cut costs.Uber has used licensed drivers in the UK since it launched, in anticipation of objections from the strong private hire taxi lobby here.The verdicts in two of the European Union s key member states come just days after the European commission called on governments to consider banning Uber - and other sharing economy firms - only as a last resort .We stopped UberPop last summer and we are disappointed by this judgment, the firm said in a statement.Saudi Arabia agreed to invest $3.5bn £2.4bn in the company earlier this month, while the world s biggest car maker Toyota has also agreed a partnership with Uber that will see it offer drivers favourable leases on cars.
A striking French taxi drivers displays the message, Uber Go Home during a national protest about competition from private car ride firms.Photograph: Charles Platiau/ReutersA French court has fined Uber and two of its executives for running an illegal transport service with non-professional drivers in the first such criminal case in Europe.It was the first time executives from the world s most valuable venture-capital backed startup have gone on trial, though the company has become embroiled in many legal battles as it has expanded to 60 countries since its founding in 2009.They had faced a possible maximum sentence of five years in jail and a €1.5m fine.UberPop has been declared illegal by courts in Italy, Spain and Germany, and appeals are pending in Belgium and the Netherlands.The company s problems in Europe have led it to shift its focus to its service staffed by professional drivers, which has grown rapidly in France and now employs about 10,000 drivers.
New Yorkers now have another way to call a taxi from their phone: Juno, a new ride-hailing app that is looking to poach drivers and passengers away from Uber.Juno was founded by Talmon Marco, an entrepreneur who made a fortune when Viber, the messaging app he founded, was sold to Rakuten for $900 million.Basically, Juno says that it's much friendlier to drivers than Uber and Lyft — it pays them more, for example.But to riders, that doesn't matter as much as whether the app works as advertised.The new app was quietly launched in beta earlier this month, and we took a ride.Here's what it's like:   View As: One PageSlides
MoreAn illustration picture shows the logo of car-sharing service app Uber on a smartphone next to the picture of an official German taxi sign in Frankfurt, September 15, 2014.REUTERS/Kai PfaffenbachFRANKFURT Reuters - A court on Thursday upheld Germany's ban on low-cost ride-hailing service UberPOP, in a further setback for Uber Technologies UBER.UL which faces legal battles throughout Europe.The Higher Regional Court in Frankfurt rejected Uber's appeal against the verdict by a lower court last year in March, which set stiff fines for any violations of local transport laws after German taxi operator group Taxi Deutschland filed a complaint.The European Commission cautioned member states last week against erecting roadblocks or even outright bans on the "sharing economy", which has also made home rentals popular among holidaymakers, by enforcing decades or even centuries-old laws.UberPOP, a smartphone app that links private drivers with passengers via their mobile phones, has prompted taxi driver protests across Europe and to date has been declared illegal by courts in Italy, Spain and Germany, while appeals are pending in Belgium and the Netherlands.In a separate case on Thursday, a French court slapped a 800,000 euros $900,000 fine on Uber for running an illegal transport service using non-professional drivers.
Image copyrightA court in France has fined the app-based taxi firm, Uber for running an illegal transport service that used non-professional drivers.Legal battlesThe French Parliament voted to outlaw UberPop and other similar services in 2014.It followed pressure from licensed taxi drivers that accused UberPop of unfair competition because it used non-professional drivers.Uber has been involved in many legal battles since it was founded in 2009, and expanded worldwide.Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty, Uber's director for Europe, Middle East and Africa was fined €30,000 and Thibaud Simphal, the company's manager in France was fined €20,000, with both of them ordered to pay half.In a statement it said "We stopped UberPop last summer and we are disappointed by this judgment.
Uber has been slapped with a €800k fine by a French court today for its illegal POP taxi service.Today Uber has been fined €800,000, reported Reuters, although half of this fine has been suspended.Two executives, Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty, Uber's EMEA director, and Thibaud Simphal, the company's national manager in France, were additionally given smaller fines after being found guilty of "deceptive commercial practices and being accomplices in operating an illegal transportation service".Gore-Coty was fined €30,000 and Simphal €20,000 – with half of their fines also being suspended.The court case follows another last year in which Uber was fined €50,000 for deceptive advertising for claims it was legal.Uber previously filed an official complaint about France to the European Commission, which has yet to rule on the business of ruling on the business.
Reuters – Former Uber and Lyft drivers in Austin, Texas, on Thursday accused the ride-hailing companies of breaking a federal law by abruptly halting operations in the city after voters backed a measure requiring them to fingerprint drivers.The lawsuits filed in federal court in San Francisco, where the companies are based, said Uber and Lyft violated a law that requires companies to give 60 days notice to employees before a mass layoff.Uber spokesman Matt Kallman declined to comment.Lyft did not respond to a request for comment.The companies suspended services in Austin on May 9, two days after residents voted to keep the city s law requiring Uber and Lyft, just like taxi companies, to conduct fingerprint-based background checks of their drivers.About 10,000 Uber and Lyft drivers lost their jobs, Uber said at the time.The companies consider drivers to be independent contractors, and Thursday s lawsuits are the latest to claim they are actually employees under various federal and state laws because of the degree of control Uber and Lyft exert.They appeared to be the first cases against the companies brought under the 1988 Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification WARN Act, which was designed to give workers time to adjust to the loss of employment.Companies that violate the law, which includes an exception for unforeseeable business circumstances, are on the hook for wages and benefits workers would have earned during the 60-day notice period.The lawsuits said the named plaintiffs, who are seeking to represent classes of Uber and Lyft drivers from Austin, have been unable to make up for the loss of income.Drivers around the country have sued Uber and Lyft claiming the companies misclassified them as independent contractors and deprived them of overtime pay, tips, reimbursements and certain employment protections.In April, Uber agreed to pay up to $100 million to 350,000 drivers in California and Massachusetts to settle claims that it owed them reimbursement for gas and mileage and withheld tips.Lyft has proposed a $27 million settlement of a similar case involving California drivers.Federal judges in San Francisco last week held hearings to consider both settlements.The cases in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California are Johnston v. Uber Technologies Inc, No.3:16-cv-03134, and Thornton v. Lyft Inc, No.
Uber France suspended the service last year after the government banned it under pressure from licensed taxi drivers.It was the first time executives from the world's most valuable venture-capital backed startup had gone on trial, although the company has become embroiled in many legal battles as it has expanded to 60 countries since its founding in 2009.They had faced a possible maximum sentence of five years in jail and a 1.5 million euro fine.The company's problems in Europe have led it to shift its focus to its service staffed by professional drivers in black sedans, which has grown rapidly in France and now employs about 10,000 drivers.A driver in the vicinity is summoned, often making it quicker and easier than booking a minicab or hailing a taxiThe app is connected to the passenger's credit card, with journeys being charged for on a per-mile and minute basis.Uber essentially takes a referral fee, with the majority going to the driverUber drivers are not employed by Uber, but are independent contractors: they work on their own time with their own vehicles and pay for their own fuelThe app has proved controversial as it has shaken up the more-regulated taxi industry, and has been accused of not respecting drivers' rightsHowever, it has been phenomenally successful: It has had billions in funding, is active in around 500 cities and has millions of users
View photosMoreA taxi passes by an advertisement for the Uber car and ride-sharing service displayed on a bus stop in Paris, France, in this March 11, 2016 file photo.REUTERS/Charles Platiau/FilesPARIS Reuters - A French court fined Uber Technologies UBERL.UL 800,000 euros $907,000 on Thursday for running an illegal transport service with non-professional drivers and slapped smaller fines on two of its executives in the first such criminal case in Europe.It was the first time executives from the world's most valuable venture-capital backed startup had gone on trial, although the company has become embroiled in many legal battles as it has expanded to 60 countries since its founding in 2009.It also found Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty, director for Europe, Middle East and Africa, and Thibaud Simphal, the company's manager in France, guilty of deceptive commercial practices and being accomplices in operating an illegal transportation service.They had faced a possible maximum sentence of five years in jail and a 1.5 million euro fine.The company's problems in Europe have led it to shift its focus to its service staffed by professional drivers in black sedans, which has grown rapidly in France and now employs about 10,000 drivers.
PARIS -- A French court has convicted Uber and two of its executives of deceptive commercial practices and illegal business activity over its lowest-cost ride service.The court fined the company 800,000 euros $907,000 and fined regional Uber executive Pierre-Dimitry Gore-Coty 30,000 euros, and Uber's France general manager Thibaud Simphal 20,000 euros.Half of all the fines were suspended.The court did not hand down prison terms, and rejected a prosecutor's request that the two executives be barred from running any company for five years.And the fines were much lower than the 100 million euros that traditional taxi services had sought.They accused the low-cost UberPop service of unfair competition because it uses non-professional drivers.
View photosMoreFILE - In this Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015 file photo Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty, general manager for western Europe of California-based Uber, listens during a round table discussion in Paris, France.Uber could face millions of euros in damages and fines and Gore-Coty and Thibaud Simphal , two of its top European executives could lose their jobs in a French court ruling expected Thursday June 9, 2016.It's the latest legal tangle for the app-based business, which has faced protests from taxi unions and regulators around the world, reflecting larger tensions between long-regulated industries and the borderless, online economy.The court fined the San Francisco-based company 800,000 euros $907,000 , regional Uber executive Pierre-Dimitry Gore-Coty 30,000 euros, and Uber's France general manager Thibaud Simphal 20,000 euros.The court did not hand prison terms, and rejected a prosecutor's request that the two executives be barred from running any company for five years.They accused the low-cost UberPop service of unfair competition because it uses non-professional drivers.
View photosMoreAn employee serves a customer inside a mobile phone care centre operated by Kenyan's telecom operator Safaricom; in the central business district of Kenya's capital Nairobi, May 11, 2016.REUTERS/Thomas MukoyaNAIROBI Reuters - Kenya's biggest telecoms company Safaricom is joining up with a local software firm to launch a ride-hailing company to take on Uber UBER.UL as it seeks new sources of revenue, its chief executive said.But regular taxi drivers have complained about its impact on business.In March, the Kenyan authorities charged six men with attempted murder and malicious damage to property over an attack on an Uber taxi driver in February.Safaricom will help develop the application, offer the network connectivity, put Wi-Fi in vehicles that will be signed up on Littlecabs, and use its mobile-phone based financial service M-Pesa to process payments, Collymore said."The direction of the company is to become a platform," he said, citing partnerships with local banks that use M-pesa to lend money on mobile phones.
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