According to a online solicitation spotted by NextGov, the navy is inviting vendors to present quotes related to the expected cost of providing "high quality training services" to its officers, which would involve them being eventually certified as ethical hackers by the International Council of Electronic Commerce Consultants EC-Council .The navy describes a certified ethical hacker as "a skilled professional who understands and knows how to look for the weaknesses and vulnerabilities in networks and/or computer systems and uses the same knowledge and tools as a malicious hacker upon request from an organisation.The certification is for individuals who are responsible for securing or testing the security of computer networks".The navy, however, is aiming to train those who specifically work with its computer networks.The move comes just months after the US Air Force's chief technology officer, Frank Koniecnzy, called for the Pentagon to consider placing responsibility for the military's IT infrastructure with third-party contractors rather than completely relying on in-house support.Military and intelligence organisations have been under pressure to retain qualified security professionals, who, given the current atmosphere to widespread and varied cyberattacks, are considered highly valuable to such organisations.
The National Security Agency is perhaps the most secretive of the 17 intelligence agencies that make up the sophisticated US spy network.Created in secret in 1952, the NSA was once jokingly referred to as "No Such Agency" or "Never Say Anything."But now, especially after a flood of top secret documents were leaked by former contractor Edward Snowden, NSA is a household name.The agency, previously shy about official statements and transparency, now has websites dedicated to its own message surrounding the leaks.And the official in charge of its elite hacker unit — which it denied even existed before Snowden — gave a public talk in February.Tech Insider was recently in Washington to cover a DARPA event at the Pentagon, so we decided to make a slight detour out to the National Cryptologic Museum, a public facility that's just a stone's throw away from NSA headquarters at Fort Meade, Md.Here's what's inside.View As: One PageSlides
Image caption Eight-inch floppy disks date back to the early days of computer systemsThe US nuclear weapons force still uses a 1970s-era computer system and floppy disks, a government report has revealed.The Government Accountability Office said the Pentagon was one of several departments where "legacy systems" urgently needed to be replaced.It said that was three times more than the investment on modern IT systems."This system remains in use because, in short, it still works," Pentagon spokeswoman Lt Col Valerie Henderson told the AFP news agency.The report said that the Pentagon was planning to fully replace the system by the end of 2020.According to the report, the US treasury also needed to upgrade its systems, which it said was using "assembly language code - a computer language initially used in the 1950s and typically tied to the hardware for which it was developed".
A recent report from the Government Accountability Office revealed that the Pentagon was one of several government agencies still using ancient legacy systems, which include Windows 3.1., COBOL and Fortran programming languages, and 40-year-old computers.Legacy IT investments across the federal government are becoming increasingly obsolete, stated the report.The Pentagon is planning to completely replace the system by the end of 2020.The report said the Internal Revenue Service's master file of taxpayer data is written in assembly language code initially used in the 1950s.Not all the technology was as ancient as eight-inch floppy disks, though; some of the agencies were found to be running the comparatively cutting-edge Windows XP."The federal government is years and in some cases decades behind the private sector," said Utah Republican Jason Chaffetz, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.
The Pentagon says the system is still in use 'because it works'A system used for controlling some of America's ballistic missiles and nuclear bombers is run from a 40-year-old computer which still uses floppy disks, a report has revealed.The Government Accountability Office GAO says the machine sends and receives emergency action messages for US nuclear forces, and stores data on 8-inch floppy disks first introduced in 1976.An upgrade to a secure digital alternative is due to be completed in 2017 to "address obsolescence concerns", according to a Pentagon spokeswoman.The humble floppy disk is a distant memory for most modern computer users - immortalised as an icon to click on for saving documents after it was largely discontinued in the mid-2000s.The GAO says the state invested $61.2bn £41.6bn into caring for old machines, some of which are more than 50 years old, as opposed to just $19.2bn £13bn on the "development and enhancement" of newer technology.It warned the government "runs the risk of maintaining systems that have outlived their effectiveness" in its non-partisan report.
It might have been the general consensus that the floppy disk, which was big in the 1980s, had had its day - but after the US government's revelation that the technology remains in use at the Pentagon, enthusiasts wonder whether there is still a place for old tech in today's hi-tech world?I am proud to say I still use video cassettes and vinyl, and have a huge record collection, supplemented by CDs to play in the car.Mark Partridge, LondonI bought my 1972 Akai 4000D player about a year ago from eBay and reconditioned it.You get 45 minutes on each reel, and it is very high-fidelity.James Clephane-Cameron, SurreyI collect and restore old British computers.I use mine to teach my children about computing and to help them understand how modern computers work.
ASSOCIATED PRESSA recent audit has found that a rather crucial part of the U.S. Defense Department s computer infrastructure still runs off floppy disks.You see these floppy disks aren t being used for some old redundant air conditioning system or the computer that controls the vending machines in the Pentagon.The U.S. Defense Department are using floppy disks to store the codes for the nukes.Well it looks like the U.S. Defense Department is just like one of those friends, except they happen to have entrusted the nuclear codes of America to a computer system that makes Windows 95 look positively space-age.Things aren t much better over at the Department of Justice either which was found to be using an IBM mainframe system that used a programming language first developed in the 50s.Secondly the DoD promises that it s going to start updating the entire system, only thing is it s not going to be ready until the end of next year.
Computers that need 8in floppy disks as large as your head are still required to communicate with US nuclear forces.A report into the state of the US government, released by congressional investigators, has revealed that the country is spending around $60bn £40.8bn to maintain museum-ready computers, which many do not even know how to operate any more, as their creators retire.We re not even talking the more modern 3.5in floppy disk that millennials might only know as the save icon.We re talking the OG 8in floppy, which was a large floppy square with a magnetic disk inside it.Shockingly, the US Government Accountability Office said: Replacement parts for the system are difficult to find because they are now obsolete.The Pentagon said it was instigating a full replacement of the ancient machines and while the entire upgrade will take longer, the crucial floppy disks should be gone by the end of next year.
It is powered by electromagnetic rails that accelerate a hardened projectile to staggering velocity—a battlefield meteorite with the power to one day transform military strategy, say supporters, and keep the U.S. ahead of advancing Russian and Chinese weaponry.The future challenge for the U.S. military, in broad terms, is maintaining a global reach with declining numbers of Navy ships and land forces.Engineer Tom Boucher, program manager for the railgun in the Office of Naval Research, explained: We are watching the system charge.The Pentagon s Strategic Capabilities office is investing another $800 million—the largest share for any project—to develop the weapon s defensive ability, as well as to adapt existing guns to fire the railgun s high-tech projectiles.Some officials expressed concern the technology has commanded too large a portion of resources and focus.The age of the gun faded after World War II, hampered by the limited range and accuracy of gunpowder weapons.
A new government report on Wednesday revealed that America's nukes are still being controlled by antique computers with 8-inch floppy disks, but a former white hat hacker says that's not necessarily a bad thing."The biggest security issue here isn't that the computer is 40 years old, but rather the quality of the lock on the door where the computer is housed," Cris Thomas, a strategist for Tenable Network Security, said in a statement.Thomas, known in hacker circles by his pseudonym Space Rogue, was one of the founding members of the legendary hacker collective L0pht.The group famously testified to the US Senate in 1998 that it could take down the Internet in 30 minutes.Interestingly, the nuclear arsenal running on decades-old computers with floppy disks makes it incredibly difficult to hack, a fact that some in the Air Force actually used as an example of why upgrading isn't really necessary.Thomas said that the IBM Series/1 computer the Pentagon is using to control nukes is most likely air-gapped — meaning it's not connected to the Internet or a network that would give remote access — so a hacker would need to be sitting at the terminal to actually do any damage.He also said the machines are "notoriously reliable" so he wasn't surprised they were still being used."As long as they can make regular copies of the software on the 8 inch floppy's so that they don't degrade, and they have a ready supply of spare parts and new floppies, there's no reason why the system wouldn't last another 40 years," he said.There is a caveat: While an outdated machine would make it hard for hackers, it also makes it hard to fix things if something goes wrong, since the coding languages it uses are aging as well.Less programmers are around that even know COBOL or FORTRAN, he explained.Regardless, the report noted that the DoD plans to update "data storage solutions, port expansion processors, portable terminals, and desktop terminals by the end of fiscal year 2017.Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
A new government report on Wednesday revealed that America s nukes are still being controlled by antique computers with 8-inch floppy disks, but a former white hat hacker says that s not necessarily a bad thing.The biggest security issue here isn t that the computer is 40 years old, but rather the quality of the lock on the door where the computer is housed, Cris Thomas, a strategist for Tenable Network Security, said in a statement.Thomas, known in hacker circles by his pseudonym Space Rogue, was one of the founding members of the legendary hacker collective L0pht.The group famously testified to the U.S. Senate in 1998 that it could take down the Internet in 30 minutes.Interestingly, having the nuclear arsenal running on decades-old computers with floppy disks makes it incredibly difficult to hack, a fact that some in the Air Force actually used as an example of why upgrading isn t really necessary.Thomas said that the IBM Series/1 computer the Pentagon is using to control nukes is most likely air-gapped — meaning it s not connected to the Internet or a network that would give remote access — so a hacker would need to be sitting at the terminal to actually do any damage.He also said the machines are notoriously reliable, so he wasn t surprised they were still being used.As long as they can make regular copies of the software on the 8 inch floppy s so that they don t degrade, and they have a ready supply of spare parts and new floppies, there s no reason why the system wouldn t last another 40 years, he said.There is a caveat: While an outdated machine would make it hard for hackers, it also makes it hard to fix things if something goes wrong, since the coding languages it uses are aging as well.Fewer programmers are around that even know COBOL or FORTRAN, he explained.Regardless, the report noted that the DoD plans to update data storage solutions, port expansion processors, portable terminals, and desktop terminals by the end of fiscal year 2017.This story originally appeared on Business Insider.
Most Expensive Gaming PCThere s nice computers, there s overkill, and then there s cramming two fully-functional PCs, 14 CPU cores, and three completely separate liquid-cooling systems into one gorgeous case.DON T MISS: A hot new smartphone brand might finally be coming to AmericaThe build, demoed at the Computex trade show in Taiwan, is the mad product of UK-based firm Overclockers UK and its in-house extreme builder 8Pack.In case that system is busy churning through video processing or breaking into the Pentagon, there s a second, more reasonable PC built into the case.It only uses a Core i7-6700K overlocked to 4.8GHz with 16GB of RAM, and should be suitable for light web browsing while you re waiting for the nuclear launch sequence to decode.Those water coolers are vented to the air via radiators with the surface area of a small aircraft carrier.Needless to say, no one — not even a supervillain hacker from a Bond movie — needs a computer this overkill.
A senior U.S. Defense Department official said in an interview that the Pentagon has reached a seven-year agreement with Globalfoundries Inc., one of the big four global chip makers, to supply the microchips.The agreement ends months of uncertainty over supplies of such chips but is just the first step in a broader effort to protect sensitive military systems from cyberattacks and other tampering.Due to market trends, supply chain globalization and manufacturing costs, the Defense Department s future access to U.S.-based microelectronics sources is uncertain, the House Armed Services Committee said in a recent report.Our goal is to look globally, Andre Gudger, the Pentagon s deputy assistant secretary for manufacturing and industrial base policy, said in an interview.The plants where chips are assembled have long been viewed by the Pentagon as a vulnerable part of the military supply chain.Chip makers have shifted their focus to the larger consumer market, where competition led to technology being refreshed in months or weeks, while military chips ordered in small numbers might be upgraded once or twice a year, industry officials said.
Jay Heinrichs was a journalist and publishing executive for 25 years before becoming a speaker, consultant, and full-time teacher of rhetoric and linguistics to Fortune 500 companies, Ivy League universities, NASA, and the Pentagon.This review will focus on the revised edition, released in 2013.Who This Book Is ForIn the first chapter of this book, titled Open Your Eyes, Heinrichs walks you through a day in his life where he experiments with avoiding all forms of rhetoric, argument, and persuasion.Here are a couple examples of chapters in this section:In Control the Tense you ll learn that all issues of persuasion boil down to three main issues: blame, values, and choice.It has four chapters in total, including some of these examples:In Spot Fallacies you ll learn to do just that.In Call a Foul you ll learn the key to rhetorical defense: remembering that the purpose of arguments is to be persuasive, not to be correct.And that s a good thing because the lessons apply to many stages of life, whether you re dealing with parents, friends, bosses, lovers, or children.
The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral on April 8, 2016.Associated Press Elon Musk, the billionaire businessman who wants to literally die on Mars after he puts an electric car in every American s garage, just had a meeting at the Pentagon with the US Secretary of Defense.Elon Musk is one of the most innovative minds in this country and the secretary, as you know, has been reaching out to a number of members of the technology community to get their ideas, their feedback, find out what s going on in the world of innovation, Peter Cook, the Pentagon s press secretary, said on Monday.But it s clearly an area where the military is currently bogged down.We often forget that Silicon Valley was built on the backs of US military budgets cranking out weapons of war and the microchips that would guide them to their destinations.But the military has arguably been worse at helping to fund dual use technology than it was during the 1990s, when we saw the US government help start the process to commercialize things like the internet and GPS.
Elon Musk is one of the most innovative minds in this country and the secretary, as you know, has been reaching out to a number of members of the technology community to get their ideas, their feedback, find out what s going on in the world of innovation, Peter Cook, the Pentagon s press secretary, said on Monday.The Pentagon has been actively courting private business in Silicon Valley over the past year to establish more ties with the defence industry, even opening up an office on the West Coast under the Defense Innovation Unit Experimental DIUx programme.But it s clearly an area where the military is currently bogged down.We often forget that Silicon Valley was built on the backs of US military budgets cranking out weapons of war and the microchips that would guide them to their destinations.But the military has arguably been worse at helping to fund dual-use technology than it was during the 1990s, when we saw the US government help start the process to commercialise things like the internet and GPS.If anyone can help the military kill more people and maybe get Americans some shiny new toys in the process , I trust Elon Iron Man in real life Musk can do it.
And now he s dropped yet another hint in favor of the Elon Iron Musk Man theory.Commenting on a CNN report that Musk has privately met with top Pentagon officials, Musk tweeted that the meeting was related to a flying metal suit.Of course, Musk could very well be joking, but who would joke about being Iron Man?In 2013, he tweeted about a system that allows one to design rocket parts using hand movements through the air, a feature he claims he s seen in the Iron Man movie.The relationship between Musk and the Pentagon has on occasion been difficult — SpaceX sued the U.S. Air Force in 2014, claiming SpaceX wasn t given a chance to compete for a lucrative satellite-launching contract; the lawsuit was settled in 2015.But the Defense Department said earlier this week that Carter has been reaching out to prominent members of the tech community for ideas and innovation, and who better to ask than the guy who s got a hangar full of reusable rockets and plans to send people to Mars by 2024.
PayPal, Tesla- and SpaceX founder Elon Musk was a week invited to a meeting with US Defense Secretary Ash Carter and now many curious of what they discussed. When CNN in an article asked the question "What was Elon Musk doing at the Pentagon?" Musk said on Twitter a bit cryptic "Something about a flying metal suit ...". This can obviously be a joke from Elon Musks side but he has previously developed an Iron Man-like interface. Given that Elon Musk is probably the closest thing to a real "Tony Stark" it would be well not completely impossible that he's eager to start building the flying exoskeleton. In a statement from the US Department of Defense said that Defense Secretary Carter: "HAS BEEN Reaching Out to a number of members of the technology community to get Their ideas, Their feedback, find out what's going on in the world of innovation."
Makeup, perfume, and cosmetics are forbidden.Averaged out across the globe, this works out at four devices per household.The game Lionhead was working on,Fable Legends, a four-versus-one fantasy-themed multiplayer game that was already in closed beta, was cancelled.ZDNetSpaceship Apple Three miles from Apple s Cupertino, California headquarters, the tech giant is building something as massive as its own global reach: Apple s Campus 2.The Spaceship, as many have nicknamed it, is over one mile in circumference -- that's wider than the Pentagon.He told the committee... Ars TechnicaHow a bad UI decision from Microsoft helped macro malware make a comeback Following numerous reports from various security firms about a large number of malware variants that use macro scripts embedded in Office documents to infect users, the US-CERT team has issued an official alert to all organizations about this resurging threat.
An American Special Forces commando in Vietnam with his AR-15, 1963: APIn 1962, the Pentagon had a pickle on its hands: America wanted to give South Vietnam guns with which to kill its Communist brothers and sisters in North Vietnam, but we couldn t figure out which guns.The results, culled from evaluations by American advisors and South Vietnamese already deployed against the Viet Cong, were crystalline: The lethality of the AR-IS and its reliability record were particularly impressive.The report describes, with grisly detail, how the AR-15, chambered with the same .223 ammunition that it uses today, not only killed VC soldiers but decapitated and dismembered them:VC soldiers shot with the AR-15 were regularly described as looking as if they had exploded :Another report notes that among five VC soldiers shot and killed by an AR-15 in one engagement, four were probably killing wounds with any weapon listed, but the fifth was essentially a flesh wound.Another field report describes how an AR-15 shot exploded one man s head and turned another person s torso into one big hole.A member of the Airborne Brigade lauded the rifle s excellent killing or stopping power.The AR-15 proved remarkably durable during jungle warfare conditions:It inspired awe and respect among soldiers for its capacity to kill:It could even shoot through dense jungle underbrush:In The Gun, C.J.
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