Working to address "hotspots" in computer chips that degrade their performance, UCLA engineers have developed a new semiconductor material, defect-free boron arsenide, that is more effective at drawing and dissipating waste heat than any other known semiconductor or metal materials.This could potentially revolutionize thermal management designs for computer processors and other electronics, or for light-based devices like LEDs.This phenomenon is described under Moore's Law, which predicts that the number of transistors on a chip will double about every two years.Each smaller generation of chips helps make computers faster, more powerful and able to do more work.Managing heat in electronics has increasingly become one of the biggest challenges in optimizing performance.This high heat slows down processor speeds, in particular at "hotspots" on chips where heat concentrates and temperatures soar.
Graphene Flagship scientists, led by researchers at ICFO - The Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona, Spain, have detected graphene's out-of-plane heat transfer in van der Waals heterostructures.In their paper published in Nature Nanotechnology they follow this process in real-time.Nanoscale heat flow plays a crucial role in many modern electronic and optoelectronic applications, such as thermal management, photodetection, thermoelectrics and data communication.The understanding of the out-of-plane heat transfer in heterostructures can help to improve the performance of graphene based electronic and optoelectronic devices.This was a collaborative research effort within the Graphene Flagship, lead by ICREA Professor Frank Koppens from ICFO - The Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona, Spain and also comprising researchers from Flagship partners in The Netherlands (Radboud University), Italy (Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia - IIT, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - CNR), Germany (RWTH Aachen University, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research) and the United Kingdom (The University of Manchester and The University of Cambridge).They observed and followed, in real-time, the way in which heat transport occurs in stacks consisting of graphene encapsulated by the dielectric layered material, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN).
Announced back in April, Galax's GTX 1070 Katana caught our attention for counting itself among the few single-slot gaming graphics cards available today.In fact, to the best of our knowledge, this is the only single-slot, air-cooled GTX 1070 in the world, as anything with a thermal design power of 75 watts or higher is typically paired with a dual-slot cooler for the added heat dissipation.There's no doubt that this is a niche product, but it should call to compact system builders who would rather not sacrifice an additional expansion slot, which could otherwise be used for hardware such as a dedicated sound card, an NVMe SSD, a Thunderbolt 3 controller, or extra SATA ports.This card may also become a popular choice for those building workstations with multiple high-end graphics cards because you only need a single slot between the cards for SLI support rather than the typical two slot spacing, which is to say that pair of Katana cards should deliver better operating temperatures than bigger dual-slot cards on boards such as the Asus ROG Strix Z270G Gaming or Asrock Z270M Extreme 4, for example.Covering the entire front side is a pancake-like aluminium fan shroud which has been painted gunmetal grey.What we found was a 4+1 VRM which is the same configuration used by Nvidia's Founders Edition model, though the VRM has switched sides and is now placed behind the display outputs.
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