From the start of Netflix black comedy Living With Yourself, streaming now, you know you're in for some weird, funny Rudd.Once an award-winning "branding bard," he now misses meetings and deadlines and has dark circles under his eyes and dribbles of toothpaste on his dark shirts.Thus, we get New Miles, who's bursting with creative inspiration and has smoother skin, better hair and more colorful shirts than Original Miles.But at its core, the thoroughly enjoyable Living With Yourself -- created by Timothy Greenberg, an Emmy-winning former producer of The Daily Show With Jon Stewart -- is about the ways we battle ourselves.It's about the voices in our heads telling us we're not good enough or smart enough or attractive enough or lovable enough, and an exploration of what enough really is anyway.Thing is, while the schlocky scientists who perform the treatment usually kill off the person who's been cloned, they don't succeed this time.
From the start of Netflix black comedy Living With Yourself, which streams on Oct. 18, you know you're in for some weird, funny Rudd.Once an award-winning "branding bard," he now misses meetings and deadlines and has dark circles under his eyes and dribbles of toothpaste on his dark shirts.Thus, we get New Miles, who's bursting with creative inspiration and has smoother skin, better hair and more colorful shirts than Original Miles.But at its core, the thoroughly enjoyable Living With Yourself -- created by Timothy Greenberg, an Emmy-winning former producer of The Daily Show With Jon Stewart -- is about the ways we battle ourselves.It's about the voices in our heads telling us we're not good enough or smart enough or attractive enough or lovable enough, and an exploration of what enough really is anyway.Thing is, while the schlocky scientists who perform the treatment usually kill off the person who's been cloned, they don't succeed this time.
Review: Part Black Mirror and part rom-com, the series stars Rudd as a guy who gets replaced by a better version of himself.Paul Rudd claws his way out of a shallow grave in the forest, wearing only plastic wrap and a diaper.Once an award-winning "branding bard," he now misses meetings and deadlines and has dark circles under his eyes and dribbles of toothpaste on his dark shirts.Thus, we get New Miles, who's bursting with creative inspiration and has smoother skin, better hair and more colorful shirts than Original Miles.But at its core, the thoroughly enjoyable Living With Yourself -- created by Timothy Greenberg, an Emmy-winning former producer of The Daily Show With Jon Stewart -- is about the ways we battle ourselves.It's about the voices in our heads telling us we're not good enough or smart enough or attractive enough or lovable enough, and an exploration of what enough really is anyway.
We’ve known Paul Rudd was going to play a guy forced to face off with himself for over a year, but the first trailer for Netflix series Living With Yourself is finally here – and it looks like the existential black comedy void that’s been gaping within us since we finished Russian Doll is finally going to be filled.The set-up for Living With Yourself – which was created and written by Daily Show alum Timothy Greenberg, and directed by Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris (Little Miss Sunshine) – is made perfectly clear in the new trailer, which just arrived today.Rudd plays Miles, a guy who’s having a rough time at work, at home, and just in general, so he takes himself to an unusual sort of health spa that promises to transform him into a new, improved version of himself.But of course, there’s a complication: The old, crappier version of Miles still exists, and he’s furious about being replaced.How will they solve the problem of Two Miles, One Life?And how will this show convince us that too many clones of Paul Rudd is actually a bad thing?
A new Netflix series will pit Paul Rudd against his mortal enemy...Paul Rudd.The show is called Living With Yourself and it was created by Daily Show alum Timothy Greenberg.According to the Hollywood Reporter, Rudd will play a troubled man who elects to undergo an inventive new treatment to become a better person, until “he finds he’s been replaced by a new and improved version — revealing that his own worst enemy is himself.” So, basically, it’s two Paul Rudds for the price of one!Netflix has ordered an eight-episode first season of what it calls a “fresh and inventive philosophical comedy,” per THR.That article also suggests Rudd will only star in the first season of the show.So, maybe, if there are subsequent seasons, those would follow different characters undergoing this same treatment?
More

Top