(University of California - San Diego) A team of University of California researchers is working to improve telepresence robots and the algorithms that drive them to help children with disabilities stay connected to their classmates, teachers and communities. The effort is funded by a $1 million grant from the National Robotics Initiative at the National Science Foundation.
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(University of Maryland Baltimore County) Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have collaborated to create a universal design schema for navigation technologies to better support people with disabilities in getting from place to place. For this study, researchers worked with technology users with a broad and diverse range of disabilities to find similarities and differences in their navigation preferences. They then used those findings to create a schema that can inform the design of future technologies.
(University of California - Irvine) From cutting-edge research and clinical trials focused on cancer care to creating a new center devoted to protecting personal data privacy, University of California, Irvine scholars, scientists and physicians are blazing new paths to help change the world. And their impact keeps growing. In fiscal 2019-20, which ended June 30, UCI researchers received the most funding in campus history: $529 million in grants and contracts.
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The article has been mechanically translated into English by Google Translate from Russian and has not been edited.Переклад цього матеріалу українською мовою з російської було автоматично здійснено сервісом Google Translate, без подальшого редагування тексту.Bu məqalə Google Translate servisi vasitəsi ilə avtomatik olaraq rus dilindən azərbaycan dilinə tərcümə olunmuşdur.(University of California, Irvine)In this course, you will follow the sounds of American English, which might sometimes be misleading - both consonants and vowels.Studying this can assist you to speak extra clearly and ensure that others can perceive what you are saying.This course is helpful for those studying English who want to enhance the pronunciation of American English for better communication.Classes last 4 weeks on 3-four hours per week.The ultimate a part of the course focuses on communication abilities and interviews.Anyone can take this course for free and receive a diploma issued by the University of Pennsylvania.Training begins on December 27.three.(University of Pennsylvania)This course is designed for those whose English is a non-native language, and who are thinking about studying more about US media literacy.In this course, you'll explore varied kinds of media - corresponding to newspapers, magazines, tv, and social media.
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The article has been mechanically translated into English by Google Translate from Russian and has not been edited.Переклад цього матеріалу українською мовою з російської було автоматично здійснено сервісом Google Translate, без подальшого редагування тексту.Bu məqalə Google Translate servisi vasitəsi ilə avtomatik olaraq rus dilindən azərbaycan dilinə tərcümə olunmuşdur.(University of California, Irvine)In this course, you'll follow the sounds of American English, which might typically be deceptive - each consonants and vowels.The ultimate part of the course focuses on communication expertise and interviews.Anyone can take this course free of charge and receive a diploma issued by the University of Pennsylvania.Training begins on December 27.3.This course is designed that can assist you understand the phrases and abbreviations which might be commonly present in US medical institutions.Training starts on December 27.four.(University of Pennsylvania)This course is designed for those whose English is a non-native language, and who're interested in learning extra about US media literacy.In this course, you will discover various types of media - corresponding to newspapers, magazines, tv, and social media.
In an article in Brain, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and elsewhere report which brain regions must be intact in stroke survivors with aphasia if they are to perform well in a speech entrainment session, successfully following along with another speaker.One of the main causes of aphasia is stroke, the third leading cause of death in the U.S. About one in three stroke survivors develops aphasia.Patients with non-fluent aphasia speak in short, halting, telegraphic sentences and have trouble forming their words."Speech entrainment is asking the person to repeat in real time what they hear and see, or in other words to copy the speech of another speaker," said Leonardo Bonilha, M.D., Ph.D., who led the study.Bonilha is the SmartState Endowed Chair for Brain Imaging and an associate professor in the Department of Neurology at MUSC.Other team members include C-STAR collaborators from Johns Hopkins University and the University of California, Irvine.
If solving a Rubik's Cube wasn't hard enough already, you can now test your skills against the dextrous new artificial intelligence system created by OpenAI.In an 18-second video posted to the company's Twitter account Tuesday, OpenAI's new robot masters the cube quickly with a single, human-like robotic hand."This is an unprecedented level of dexterity for a robot, and is hard even for humans to do," OpenAI tweeted.Earlier this year, researchers at the University of California at Irvine unveiled an AI algorithm (sans robot arm) that can analyze more than 10 billion possible combinations to solve a Rubik's cube in just over a second.OpenAI's robot still hasn't perfected its technique, though.It only solves the cube 60% of the time, according to the company's blog.
If solving a Rubik's Cube wasn't hard enough already, you can now test your skills against the dextrous new artificial intelligence system created by Open AI.In an 18-second video posted to the company's Twitter account Tuesday, Open AI's new robot masters the cube quickly with a single, human-like robotic hand."This is an unprecedented level of dexterity for a robot, and is hard even for humans to do," OpenAI tweeted Tuesday.Earlier this year, researchers at the University of California, Irvine unveiled an AI algorithm (sans robot arm) that can analyze more than 10 billion possible combinations to solve a Rubik's cube in just over a second.Open AI's robot still hasn't perfected its technique, though.It only solves the cube 60% of the time, according to the company's blog.
Irvine, Calif. - Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a new scanning transmission electron microscopy method that enables visualization of the electric charge density of materials at sub-angstrom resolution.With this technique, the UCI scientists were able to observe electron distribution between atoms and molecules and uncover clues to the origins of ferroelectricity, the capacity of certain crystals to possess spontaneous electric polarization that can be switched by the application of an electric field."This method is an advancement in electron microscopy - from detecting atoms to imaging electrons - that could help us engineer new materials with desired properties and functionalities for devices used in data storage, energy conversion and quantum computing," said team leader Xiaoqing Pan, UCI's Henry Samueli Endowed Chair in Engineering and a professor of both materials science & engineering and physics & astronomy.Employing a new aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope with a fine electron probe measuring half an angstrom and a fast-direct electron detection camera, his group was able to acquire a 2D raster image of diffraction patterns from a region of interest in the sample."With our new microscope, we can routinely form an electron probe as small as 0.6 angstrom, and our high-speed camera with angular resolution can acquire 4D STEM images with 512 x 512 pixels at greater than 300 frames per second," Pan said."Using this technique, we can see the electron charge distribution between atoms in two different perovskite oxides, non-polar strontium titanate and ferroelectric bismuth ferrite."
Irvine, Calif., Sept. 17, 2019 - An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the University of California, Irvine has developed a new technique for predicting the final size of a wildfire from the moment of ignition.Built around a machine learning algorithm, the model can help in forecasting whether a blaze is going to be small, medium or large by the time it has run its course - knowledge useful to those in charge of allocating scarce firefighting resources."A useful analogy is to consider what makes something go viral in social media," said lead author Shane Coffield, a UCI doctoral student in Earth system science."We can think about what properties of a specific tweet or post might make it blow up and become really popular - and how you might predict that at the moment it's posted or right before it's posted."It sounds extreme, but this scenario has become all too common in recent years in parts of the western United States as climate change has resulted in hot and dry conditions on the ground that can put a region at high risk of ignition.By feeding it climate data and crucial details about atmospheric conditions and the types of vegetation present around the starting point of a fire, the researchers could predict the final size of a blaze 50 percent of the time.
In the last decade, many commentators have expressed concern over how much time we spend using technology and its effects on mental health.This is particularly an issue with younger people, who can experience high rates of cyberbullying and can have adverse reactions to social media.However, teens themselves don’t necessarily agree, with surveys showing they are aware of the potential downsides of using technology but are also positive about its benefits.A new study from the University of California, Irvine, investigated this issue by tracking how much time teens spent on their phones and seeing if this was linked to worse mental health outcomes.And spoiler alert: The researchers didn’t find a link between technology use and mental health.The team surveyed over 2000 young people and then specifically tracked the smartphone use of nearly 400 subjects between the ages of 10 and 15 for two weeks.
Voters may form false memories after seeing fabricated news stories, especially if those stories align with their political beliefs, according to research in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.The research was conducted in the week preceding the 2018 referendum on legalizing abortion in Ireland, but the researchers suggest that fake news is likely to have similar effects in other political contexts, including the U.S. presidential race in 2020."In highly emotional, partisan political contests, such as the 2020 US Presidential election, voters may 'remember' entirely fabricated news stories," says lead author Gillian Murphy of University College Cork."In particular, they are likely to 'remember' scandals that reflect poorly on the opposing candidate.'She and her colleagues, including leading memory researcher Elizabeth Loftus of the University of California, Irvine, recruited 3,140 eligible voters online and asked them whether and how they planned to vote in the referendum.The researchers then informed the eligible voters that some of the stories they read had been fabricated, and invited the participants to identify any of the reports they believed to be fake.
A team of scientists recently conducted a first-of-its-kind experiment to study the effects of space radiation on a living brain.And the results don’t bode well for NASA‘s planned mission to Mars.The research was conducted by lead author Charles Limoli and scientists from University of California, Irvine, Stanford University, Colorado State University, and the Eastern Virginia School of Medicine.It involved using a new neutron irradiation facility to expose laboratory mice to the same levels of radiation they’d experience in space.According to the team’s paper:We have uncovered that realistic, low dose rate exposures produce serious neurocognitive complications associated with impaired neurotransmission.
An artificial intelligence algorithm is putting humans to shame by solving a Rubik's Cube in just over a second.The algorithm, called DeepCubeA, was created by researchers at University of California, Irvine.The results are described in a study published Monday in Nature Machine Intelligence.The algorithm was presented with 10 billion combinations for the cube.The goal was to decode them all in 30 moves, which exceeds or is equal to human performance.DeepCubeA was then tested on 1,000 combinations and solved them all, doing so in the least number of moves around 60% of the time.
"It's a venture capital-backed mindset where you want to have many product iterations fail as quickly as you can," says Sean Dettrick, the company's director of computational sciences."If you have a bad concept you want to realize that as quickly as possible and move on to the next concept."The Department of Energy (DOE) has fueled TAE Technologies' quest in with awards of computer time through the INCITE (Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment) program.Theta helps TAE sift the physical models underlying codes that simulate the vastly different temporal and spatial scales inherent to plasma physics.The company's ambitious goal is to generate affordable, abundant, carbon-free energy for everyone with no environmental impact, no harmful byproducts, and no meltdown risk."We have a program to create a completely simulated FRC in a computer," says Toshiki Tajima, the Norman Rostoker Chair Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of California, Irvine, and TAE's chief science officer.
Irvine, Calif., July 16, 2019 - A new wireless transceiver invented by electrical engineers at the University of California, Irvine boosts radio frequencies into 100-gigahertz territory, quadruple the speed of the upcoming 5G, or fifth-generation, wireless communications standard.The team's innovation is outlined in a paper published recently in the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits."The Federal Communications Commission recently opened up new frequency bands above 100 gigahertz," said lead author and postgraduate researcher Hossein Mohammadnezhad, a UCI grad student at the time of the work who this year earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering & computer science.Having transmitters and receivers that can handle such high-frequency data communications is going to be vital in ushering in a new wireless era dominated by the "internet of things," autonomous vehicles, and vastly expanded broadband for streaming of high-definition video content and more.According to Heydari, changing frequencies of signals through modulation and demodulation in transceivers has traditionally been done via digital processing, but integrated circuit engineers have in recent years begun to see the physical limitations of this method."Moore's law says we should be able to increase the speed of transistors - such as those you would find in transmitters and receivers - by decreasing their size, but that's not the case anymore," he said.
Even so, human nerds are left in the dust and this neural net can be used for other tricksA new neural-network can solve a Rubik’s cube twice as fast as the fastest human – though roughly three times slower than the fastest dumb algorithm – according to research published in Nature Machine Intelligence on Monday.Though the AI approach is not a nippy as the fastest traditional computational method, specifically the world-beating min2phase algorithm out of MIT, it has promise beyond old-school playground puzzles: for one thing, it could be put to better use studying proteins.People who enter these contests are known as speedcubers, and the current world record belongs to Yusheng Du, a Chinese speedcuber that cracked the puzzle in just 3.47 seconds.The system developed by a team of researchers at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), made up of a deep neural network can solve a Rubik’s Cube in an average of 28 moves in 1.2 seconds, Forest Agostinelli, first author of the paper and a PhD student at UCI, told The Register.DeepCubeA was trained using reinforcement learning.
Irvine, Calif., July 15, 2019 - Since its invention by a Hungarian architect in 1974, the Rubik's Cube has furrowed the brows of many who have tried to solve it, but the 3D logic puzzle is no match for an artificial intelligence system created by researchers at the University of California, Irvine.DeepCubeA, a deep reinforcement learning algorithm programmed by UCI computer scientists and mathematicians, can find the solution in a fraction of a second, without any specific domain knowledge or in-game coaching from humans.This is no simple task considering that the cube has completion paths numbering in the billions but only one goal state - each of six sides displaying a solid color - which apparently can't be found through random moves.For a study published today in Nature Machine Intelligence, the researchers demonstrated that DeepCubeA solved 100 percent of all test configurations, finding the shortest path to the goal state about 60 percent of the time."Artificial intelligence can defeat the world's best human chess and Go players, but some of the more difficult puzzles, such as the Rubik's Cube, had not been solved by computers, so we thought they were open for AI approaches," said senior author Pierre Baldi, UCI Distinguished Professor of computer science.Once the code was in place and running, DeepCubeA trained in isolation for two days, solving an increasingly difficult series of combinations.
In the US, nine people are injured in motor vehicle crashes for every 100 million miles traveled in cars, according to data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.“Accidents are going to be rare anyway, and models tend to miss rare events because they just don’t occur frequently enough,” says Tristan Glatard, an associate professor of computer science at Concordia University, where he’s working with colleagues to build models that might predict car crashes before they happen.“It’s like finding a needle in a haystack.”Some good things might happen if someone could find that needle, if they managed to transform streets and roads into streams of data, and predict what might happen there.Emergency responders might arrive at crashes a bit faster.In May, a team of medical researchers with UCLA and University of California, Irvine published a paper in the journal Jama Surgery suggesting that places in California might be able to use data from the crowdsourced traffic app Waze to cut emergency response times.
Irvine, Calif. - The nations that have signed agreements to stabilize the global mean temperature by 2050 will fail to meet their goals unless existing fossil fuel-burning infrastructure around the world is retired early, according to a study - published today in Nature - by researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions."We need to reach net-zero carbon dioxide emissions by midcentury to achieve stabilization of global temperatures as called for in international agreements such as the Paris accords," said lead author Dan Tong, a UCI postdoctoral scholar in Earth system science.The number of fossil fuel-burning power plants and vehicles in the world has increased dramatically in the past decade, spurred by rapid economic and industrial development in places such as China and India.Meanwhile, the average age of infrastructure in developed countries has decreased.According to the study, emissions from existing energy infrastructure take up the entire carbon budget to limit mean warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius and close to two-thirds of the budget to keep warming to under 2 C over the next three decades.Although the pace of growth has slowed in recent years, a significant amount of new electricity-generating capacity has been proposed globally; some of it is already under construction.
If you thought the heat wave-induced melting of half of Greenland’s surface was alarming, wait until you hear the long-term projections for its ice sheet.Research published last week in Science Advances finds that if emissions continue to climb at their current rate, all of Greenland’s ice could melt by the year 3000, causing sea levels to rise 23 feet and redrawing coastlines around the world.On timescales a bit closer to home, doing nothing to rein in carbon emissions soon could translate to ice losses from Greenland that raise sea levels six inches to a foot by 2100, and 2-5 feet by 2200, permanently inundating low-lying coastal cities and island nations.The researchers arrived at their grim findings by using supercomputers to run ice sheet models out to the end of the millennium.They looked at three different carbon emissions scenarios, one in which we rapidly ratchet down global carbon emissions, a middle of the road scenario, and a worst-case scenario where we keep burning fossil fuels with abandon, modelling each one 500 times.The models featured improved representation of the flow and speed of outlet glaciers, those frozen rivers that drain ice from Greenland’s interior and dump it out to sea.
If sharks and sunburns don’t scare you at the beach, perhaps this will: according to preliminary research out this week, it only takes a 10-minute swim in the sea to get your skin covered in a fresh coat of bacteria.While that’s not necessarily bad, some of these bacteria could be disease-causing or raise your risk of infection by disrupting your skin’s delicate microbial environment, known as the microbiome.For their quirky study, researchers at the University of California, Irvine went to the beach and recruited a select set of beachgoers.They were people who only swam in the sea infrequently and who weren’t using sunscreen at the moment.Before swimming, the nine volunteers who were ultimately recruited had a skin swap taken from the back of their calf, then went on a 10-minute swim.“Our data demonstrate for the first time that ocean water exposure can alter the diversity and composition of the human skin microbiome,” said lead author Marisa Chattman Nielsen, a PhD student at the University of California, Irvine, in a release from the university.
Irvine, Calif., June 6, 2019 - In a paper published this week in Nature, materials science researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions unveil a new process for producing oxide perovskite crystals in exquisitely flexible, free-standing layers.A two-dimensional rendition of this substance is intriguing to scientists and engineers, because 2D materials have been shown to possess remarkable electronic properties, including high-temperature superconductivity."Through our successful fabrication of ultrathin perovskite oxides down to the monolayer limit, we've created a new class of two-dimensional materials," said co-author Xiaoqing Pan, professor of materials science & engineering and Henry Samueli Endowed Chair in Engineering at UCI.For all of their promising physical and chemical properties, oxide perovskites are difficult to render in flat layers due to the clunky, strongly bonded structure of their crystals.Earlier efforts at making free-standing, monolayer films of the material through the pulsed laser deposition method failed.Pan's cross-disciplinary group of researchers applied a technique called molecular beam epitaxy to grow the thin oxide films layer by layer on a template with a water-dissolvable buffer, followed by etching and transfer.
Irvine, Calif., June 5, 2019 -- A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers."Until now, stem cell therapies for autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases have produced mixed results in clinical trials, partly because we don't know how the treatments work," said corresponding author Weian Zhao, an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences and biomedical engineering who is affiliated with the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center."This study helps unravel that mystery and paves the way for testing with human patients."In past experiments, intravenously injected stem cells - taken from bone marrow and activated with interferon gamma, an immune system protein - often got trapped in filter organs before reaching their target.In addition to rejuvenating lost motor skills and decreasing nerve damage caused by MS, they normalized the subjects' immune systems, something conventional drugs can't do, said study co-lead author Reza Mohammadi, a UCI doctoral candidate in materials science & engineering.More experiments are in the pipeline.
The study's authors analyzed trends in global water usage from 1980 to 2016, with a particular focus on so-called inflexible consumption, the curtailment of which would cause significant financial and societal hardship.Those uses include irrigating perennial crops, cooling thermal power plants, storing water in reservoirs, and quenching the thirst of livestock and humans."By looking at how water is actually used, we can begin to see what water is really difficult to do without and if there are any opportunities for savings in other areas."Evaluating watersheds on six continents, they found numerous hot spots - places where a drought or heat wave could put a strain on reserves - as well as numerous chances to conserve resources through new technologies and better management practices.According to the study, the top 10 percent of the most stressed river basins support about 19 percent of the world's population, 19 percent of thermal electricity generation and one-third of irrigated agricultural production.In addition, the researchers discovered a significant increase in water stress for the worst-impacted regions over the 37-year study period.
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Your smartphone is an obvious example: it knows where you are, where your car is parked, when you are moving, and what you are saying.Your Fit-bit bracelet may keep track of your steps, calories, and sleep cycles.https://is.gd/DLAxlJ Companies are clearly investing in the internet of thing and for future jobs, it’s paramount to be well versed so you’re not only hirable but indispensable to future employers.Further, understanding both the benefits and risks can help you further the internet of things along in the safest way to fellow humankind.2) Coursera: Offered through the University of California-Irvine, a renowned university amongst the tech community.3) IBM: IBM offers a FREE course called “A Developer’s Guide to the Internet of Things.” This Introductory course offers knowledge of basic programming skills: Python and JavaScript.
The paper titled, "Crowdsourced Traffic Data as an Emerging Tool to Monitor Car Crashes," was published today in JAMA Surgery."According to our research, it takes emergency medical service (EMS) units an average of seven to 14 minutes to arrive on scene after a 911 call," said Bharath Chakravarthy, vice chair of research and academic affairs for the UCI School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine and one of the researchers on the study."Crowdsourced traffic data might help to cut that time by as much as 60 percent."The ability to use crowdsourced user-generated traffic data has several immediate clinical implications for treatment and mortality rates among motor vehicle crash victims as well as for improving efficiency around emergency department operations in the United States.Trauma surgeons could be notified earlier, diagnostic testing could be prioritized for crash victims, and blood and other life-saving equipment could be made available sooner," said Chakravarthy."These pre-hospital and hospital level resources, if activated sooner, could aid in increasing quality and rapidity of patient care and potentially reduce morbidity and mortality."
The latest sign comes courtesy of the National Snow and Ice Data Centre (NSIDC), which released its monthly sea ice update on Thursday.It shows that just 1.2 per cent of ice in the Arctic Ocean is older than four years.Just 35 years ago, ice that was four years old or older made up nearly a third of all Arctic sea ice.It acts as an anchor for younger ice and a buffer against the storms that pound the region.While the summer melt season isn’t likely to deliver the final knockout punch, it will be yet another blow to the region’s ice.That comes as the Arctic hit a new April low for sea ice extent, beating out April 2016 for the ignominious title.
The latest sign comes courtesy of the National Snow and Ice Data Centre (NSIDC), which released its monthly sea ice update on Thursday.It shows that just 1.2 per cent of ice in the Arctic Ocean is older than four years.Just 35 years ago, ice that was four years old or older made up nearly a third of all Arctic sea ice.It acts as an anchor for younger ice and a buffer against the storms that pound the region.While the summer melt season isn’t likely to deliver the final knockout punch, it will be yet another blow to the region’s ice.That comes as the Arctic hit a new April low for sea ice extent, beating out April 2016 for the ignominious title.
Anyone who has ever worked in an open-plan office will have be aware of just how drastically different people’s individual temperature preferences are.It’s one reason why the thermostat is arguably the biggest source of conflict in offices around the world.Wouldn’t it be great if there was a material that could more easily adapt to temperature requirements; either trapping in or releasing heat as required?That’s exactly what researchers from the University of California, Irvine, have been developing.Inspired by the so-called “space blanket,” the reflective blanket you often see marathon runners wrapping themselves in after a race, they have created a new type of material able to change its reflective properties upon stretching.Rather than having to take off or add layers of clothing to change temperatures, this dynamic material comes with the promise of regulating or controlling the temperature with just one garment.
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