Parking is nobody s favorite thing to do and is probably even more worrying for the people who have opted to own a self-parking car and put all their faith into the vehicle.While self-driving or parking cars are definitely the way forward and mostly safe, there are still some teething problems – as demonstrated by a Tesla Model S, which rolled into the back of a lorry while parking itself in Utah, according to its owner.In an apparent response to the worrisome incident, Tesla has updated its Summon mode for all Model X and Model S cars.While the premise remains the same – Summon mode allows car owners to park or have the car come to them autonomously – it s now necessary for the owner to confirm the path their car will take so they can account for any obstacles that might not have been picked up by the vehicle s systems already.There are many questions about the Utah incident – mainly because the logs appear to show the owner was alerted several times of the giant obstruction.If you do happen to send your Model S to park underneath a truck, you ll soon have nobody to blame but yourself.
Image Source: The VoidGoogle s new Android-based virtual reality platform Daydream is likely a step in the right direction, as it ll help the VR ecosystem grow in the coming years.However, there s a company out there that s building the first ever 5D amusement park that ll deliver a virtual experience ready to take over all your senses.DON T MISS: How I added microSD support to my iPhone 6sAbout a year ago, we talked about The Void, the innovative amusement park in question that s opening in Utah next year, and new videos reveal that the project is coming along quite nicely.Gamers would have virtual reality helmets covering their eyes, but they ll move inside a man-made maze that s digitally recreated inside the VR app.They ll have laser tags guns in their hands and wear vests that ll offer force feedback.Here s one video the company posted on YouTube recently with reactions from early visitors:Breaking Bad star Aaron Paul is equally impressed and pretty much speechless:The first Void Experience Center opens up in Utah next year, and we can only hope it ll be one of many virtual reality amusements parks that will open soon.
You can also use it for the opposite — having it pull out and start when you're ready to get in and drive.The new update, posted by a Tesla owner on Imgur, will require users to choose the direction they want their car to go in before they physically exit it, the Verge first reported.The update could be in response to a particularly nasty crash that occurred in early May by an owner using the Summon feature.The owner, Jared Overton of Utah, said the car drove itself into a trailer.Tesla told Overton that the crash occurred from him not being attentive while using the Summon feature.It's unclear whether the update was in fact rolled out in response to the crash.A Tesla spokesperson did not immediately return Tech Insider's request for comment.Read the original article on Tech Insider.Copyright 2016.More from Tech Insider:Nobody sends mail in Finland anymore, so postal workers are mowing lawns insteadThe internet is obsessed with these stunning 'mirror cakes'Bill Gates says everyone should read this book about the moon blowing upEating breakfast isn't actually all that important, according to scienceThe entire country of Portugal ran on wind, solar, and hydropower for four days straightNOW WATCH: Here s what it s like to drive the Tesla Model X — 'the best car ever according to Elon MuskLoading video...
Vegas.com looked at flight data from the past two years to come up with the best time to book, depending on your region.For each region, they looked at tens of thousands of flights from a number of different popular airlines, including AirTran, American Airlines, Alaska Airlines, Frontier Airlines, JetBlue, Spirit Airlines, United Airlines, US Airways and Virgin America.Here s the ideal time frame and day of the week to book if you re looking fort the best deal:CaliforniaBook more than six weeks in advanceTuesdays are the best day of the week to bookPacific West Region Alaska, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington Book eight to nine weeks in advanceThursdays are the best day of the week to bookMountain West Region Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Wyoming, Utah Book at least three weeks in advance.Mondays are the best day of the week to bookWest South Central Region Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas Book seven to nine weeks in advanceSundays are the best day of the week to bookEast South Central Region Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee Book eight to ten weeks in advanceFridays are the best day of the week to bookSouth Atlantic Region Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Washington, D.c., West Virginia Book at least six weeks in advanceFridays are the best day of the week to bookWest North Central Region Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota Book seven weeks in advanceMondays and Wednesdays are the best day of the week to bookEast North Central Region Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin Book at least four weeks in advanceThere wasn t really a best day of the week to book, as prices were similar no matter what the day of the week flights were booked.It should go without saying that these are generalizations based on averaging the data, so take that for what it s worth: an overall idea of when to book.For the best deal, you still want to monitor prices and use your own discretion, but this info gives you a good starting point and a basic idea of what to expect.
Utah Senator Todd Weiler has proposed a bill to rid the state of porn by adding Internet filters and anti-porn software on all cell phones and requiring citizens to opt-in before viewing porn online.However, it looks like England s Internet porn laws have backfired, with some programs blocking rape crisis centers, sex-ed sites for children and sites actually offering help to people with a porn addiction.The Chinese government has poured hundreds of millions of dollars into censorship and have failed at restricting what their people can see.The state also seems hyper-focused on pornography, compared to other states, with advertisements and groups taking up arms against porn.Billboards offering help and counseling to those with a porn addiction line the major metro areas along the freeway from Ogden to Provo.Kids will find things you don t want them to — both online and off.
For the purpose of valuing my shares, says Michael Halloran, a securities lawyer with Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.Chris Biow, a former executive and shareholder at MarkLogic Inc. and MongoDB Inc.—two software startups valued at over $1 billion—says he regularly discusses Delaware inspection rights with groups of employees for each company.San Carlos, Calif.-based MarkLogic, valued at $1 billion by investors a year ago, eventually agreed to let Mr. Biow view its financial results in its office in 2014, though it has refused to share a full stockholder list, he said.Meanwhile, Mr. Biederman, who left Utah-based Domo in February 2015 after four years, says he is still trying to get information from the company.A month later he submitted an affidavit citing his rights under Delaware law.Since he filed the affidavit, two divergent signals have exposed the difficulty in valuing his shares.
Image: Goldfinger, 1964 Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-center hits.That s the conclusion of Daniel Russell, an acoustician at Pennsylvania State University, who described the results of his latest experiments earlier today at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.Last summer, he heard that Nike Golf was designing a new line of composite drivers with the goal of addressing that unpleasant impact sound.It was such a different—some say annoyingly loud—sound, it raised eyebrows.Kerrian likens the sound of impact from the SUMO 2 to the tin-can ping of an aluminum baseball bat—a pet peeve of avid baseball players, who generally prefer the satisfying crack of a wooden bat.Acoustics can help find a happy medium between the two extremes, according to Russell: Understanding how and why clubs make the sounds they make is the first step toward helping sports engineers design clues that sound just right, while still hitting the ball straight and far.
The White House has been pushing to replace workhorse systems that date back more than 50 years in some cases.But the government is expected to spend $7 billion less on modernization in 2017 than in 2010, said the Government Accountability Office.Part of the problem is finding money to invest in a transition to new systems at agencies across the government.Most of the employees who developed these systems are ready to retire and the agency will lose their collective knowledge, the report said.The federal government runs the risk of continuing to maintain investments that have outlived their effectiveness and are consuming resources that outweigh their benefits.This is not a partisan issue, said committee chairman Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, who supports modernizing the government s aging systems, but has not committed to any particular legislation.
More FILE - In this Thursday, March 8, 2012, file photo, Clarium Capital President Peter Thiel speaks during his keynote speech at the StartOut LGBT Entrepreneurship Awards in San Francisco.AP Photo/Ben Margot, File Here's some biographical information on billionaire tech investor Peter Thiel, who has been secretly funding Hulk Hogan's lawsuit against Gawker Media, according to published reports:BORN: Oct. 11, 1967, in Frankfurt, Germany.COMPANY CONNECTIONS: Thiel co-founded PayPal in 1998 and was its chairman and CEO.He has also donated to the campaigns of former GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, which tracks political fundraising and spending.He's backed other unusual projects, including an effort to try new forms of government on man-made islands that would float outside the territory of current nations.He's also supported the Human Rights Foundation, the Committee to Protect Journalists and the Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence.
Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-centre hits.That s the conclusion of Daniel Russell, an acoustician at Pennsylvania State University, who described the results of his latest experiments earlier today at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.Last summer, he heard that Nike Golf was designing a new line of composite drivers with the goal of addressing that unpleasant impact sound.It was such a different — some say annoyingly loud — sound, it raised eyebrows.Kerrian likens the sound of impact from the SUMO 2 to the tin-can ping of an aluminium baseball bat — a pet peeve of avid baseball players, who generally prefer the satisfying crack of a wooden bat.Acoustics can help find a happy medium between the two extremes, according to Russell: Understanding how and why clubs make the sounds they make is the first step toward helping sports engineers design clues that sound just right, while still hitting the ball straight and far.
A backup nuclear control messaging system at the U.S. Department of Defense runs on an IBM Series 1 computer, first introduced in 1976, and uses eight-inch floppy disks, while the Internal Revenue Service's master file of taxpayer data is written in assembly language code that's more than five decades old, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office.Some agencies are still running Windows 3.1, first released in 1992, as well as the newer but unsupported Windows XP, Representative Jason Chaffetz, a Utah Republican, noted during a Wednesday hearing on outdated government IT systems."The federal government is years, and sometimes decades, behind the private sector."The GAO told lawmakers that the Department of Veterans Affairs' payroll system and its benefits delivery network is written in COBOL, a programming language dating back to the 1950s, as is the Department of Justice's federal inmate tracking system and the Social Security Administration's retirement benefits system.Budget cuts in recent years have also slowed agencies' ability to update their IT systems, added Terry Milholland, CTO at the IRS.Governments need new PCs, tooSeveral committee Democrats called on Congress to pass the Information Technology Modernization Act, a bill that would establish a $3.1 billion rotating fund to help agencies update their IT systems.
Back in 2006, Nike introduced the high-performance SUMO 2 golf club driver, specially engineered to help golfers hit straighter shots, even for slightly off-centre hits.That s the conclusion of Daniel Russell, an acoustician at Pennsylvania State University, who described the results of his latest experiments earlier today at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.Last summer, he heard that Nike Golf was designing a new line of composite drivers with the goal of addressing that unpleasant impact sound.It was such a different — some say annoyingly loud — sound, it raised eyebrows.Kerrian likens the sound of impact from the SUMO 2 to the tin-can ping of an aluminium baseball bat — a pet peeve of avid baseball players, who generally prefer the satisfying crack of a wooden bat.Acoustics can help find a happy medium between the two extremes, according to Russell: Understanding how and why clubs make the sounds they make is the first step toward helping sports engineers design clues that sound just right, while still hitting the ball straight and far.
asks Charles Elson, director of the John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at the University of Delaware.CEO pay packages now hinge on multiple layers of sometimes esoteric measurements of performance.Many say they get better results, but critics have begun pushing mutual-fund companies and other big stock shareholders with clout to offer up more resistance as CEO pay sets records.Michael Cooper, a finance professor at the University of Utah and one of the paper's authors, is quick to say that he can't be sure whether the high pay caused the weaker returns, or whether they're just correlated.But he says a likely explanation is that big paychecks can make CEOs overconfident and lead to wasteful spending decisions.He's in the midst of updating the data now, to run through 2015, but the trend seems to have held up.
Left turns aren t just dangerous—forcing drivers to risk particularly violent head-on and 90-degree crashes—they re inefficient.Meanwhile, a highway travels above the whole dance, allowing even more vehicles to move through a relatively constrained area.So far, they ve been especially hot in states like Utah and Missouri, where traveling wide distances is a way of life.What crashes remained were much less likely to kill.In a country where even the well-vetted roundabout can be considered an out-there traffic management idea, diverging diamonds are catching on quick.If only the US devoted such dazzling feats of geometric mastery to, say, bike lanes.
Reuters — New York state s financial regulator, which recently launched a probe into LendingClub Corp, is preparing to look into the activities at other online lenders and whether they should be licensed in New York, a person familiar with the matter said on Wednesday.The New York Department of Financial Services NYDFS has not yet established which companies it may target, but information it receives in response to a May 17 subpoena sent to LendingClub, one of the largest online lending services, could shed light on broader industry practices that require scrutiny, said the person, who was not authorized to discuss the issue publicly.Last week, NYDFS subpoenaed San-Francisco based LendingClub, a so-called peer-to-peer lender, asking for information about loans it issued to New Yorkers since May 17, 2013.It has said it will cooperate fully with the investigation.Hailed as a fintech rival to traditional banks in the wake of the financial crisis, lenders like LendingClub enjoyed rapid growth and attracted plenty of investor dollars through their promise to provide quick and cheap unsecured personal and business loans online.regulators have taken baby steps so far to regulate the sector, with the Treasury this month calling for greater scrutiny.The NYDFS can determine whether a lender s interest rate practices comply with the state s usury laws, which cap interest rates at 16 percent.LendingClub charges interest rates as low as 5 percent and as high as 29 percent, according to the company s data.LendingClub, which is not licensed in New York, has previously said it is able to charge rates above 16 percent because it funnels its business via WebBank in Utah, where there is no interest rate cap.Broader examination of the industry by NYDFS could lead to licensing requirements for online lenders in the state along with additional oversight of business practices and loan terms.The ramped-up scrutiny could trigger headaches for other leading online lenders such as Prosper, the second-largest marketplace lender, and Ondeck, among others.It is unclear where Ondeck is licensed, and a representative did not immediately return a call requesting comment.The entire industry is already smarting from weakening investor appetite for their loans as defaults rise.New York s action is at least the second probe launched against LendingClub since its founder and chief executive, Renaud Laplanche, was ousted earlier this month after an internal probe found the company had falsified documentation when selling a package of loans.The U.S. Department of Justice launched an investigation into the events leading up to Laplanche s departure.LendingClub has also said that it was in contact with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, although the reason for those communications was unclear.
A recent report from the Government Accountability Office revealed that the Pentagon was one of several government agencies still using ancient legacy systems, which include Windows 3.1., COBOL and Fortran programming languages, and 40-year-old computers.Legacy IT investments across the federal government are becoming increasingly obsolete, stated the report.The Pentagon is planning to completely replace the system by the end of 2020.The report said the Internal Revenue Service's master file of taxpayer data is written in assembly language code initially used in the 1950s.Not all the technology was as ancient as eight-inch floppy disks, though; some of the agencies were found to be running the comparatively cutting-edge Windows XP."The federal government is years and in some cases decades behind the private sector," said Utah Republican Jason Chaffetz, chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.
The new legislation would require law enforcement agencies to get court approval before gaining access to the documents of U.S. residents stored elsewhereA new bill in Congress would require U.S. law enforcement agencies to obtain court-ordered warrants before demanding the emails of the country's residents when they are stored overseas.The International Communications Privacy Act, introduced Wednesday by three senators, would close a loophole that allows law enforcement agencies to request emails and other electronic documents without warrants.The issue of warrants for foreigner communications has been in the news since late 2013, when a New York court issued a warrant allowing the U.S. Department of Justice to obtain a foreign suspect's emails stored on a Microsoft server in Ireland.While Hatch pushed the Senate Judiciary Committee to consider his bill, the panel on Thursday postponed a vote on a second email privacy bill.Under U.S. law, police need warrants to get their hands on paper files in a suspect's home or office and on electronic files stored on his computer or in the cloud for less than 180 days.But under ECPA, police agencies need only a subpoena, not reviewed by a judge, to demand files stored in the cloud or with other third-party providers for longer than 180 days.
Qualtrics, a Provo, Utah, company whose online survey research platforms help 8,500 enterprise customers better understand both their employees and their customers, has made its first acquisition, picking up four-year-old, Seattle-based Statwing.Statwing makes web-based statistical analysis software.The plan now is to integrate it into the Qualtrics Insight Platform, where its technology will ostensibly make statistical analysis faster and easier for Qualtrics s customers.Statwing had raised an undisclosed amount of money from Y Combinator and angel investors, including Cloudera founder Jeff Hammerbacher, Slicehost founder Jason Seats, and IndexTank founder Diego Basch.Its most recent round, which closed in September 2014, was a $150 million Series B financing that included Insight Venture Partners and earlier backers Accel Partners and Sequoia Capital.Qualtrics was bootstrapped for its first 10 years.
No one knows the potential impact of the Silicon Valley bubble bursting, but one thing s for sure — it s no longer enough to set up shop in Silicon Valley and have a good idea and some cash.In Utah there is less aggregate investment though last year Kickstart Seed Fund set a state record .From the outside it can be tough to spot the draw — restaurants close early, it s wicked hot in the summer and Hoth-cold in the winter — but people who are from here call it home, and people who move here love it.These are crucial things to consider, but a firm shouldn t spend all its cash on setting up shop.Whether or not a tech bubble exists, the companies that make it through will likely have been brutally vetted by VCs, will have founders who believe in constrained creativity and run lean and that quickly found product/market fit and a successful model.The Bay Area used to be the de facto answer for Where should I launch my tech startup?
A Utah apartment complex is going one better: instead of squelching negative reviews, owners of the complex are trying to coerce tenants into giving positive feedback.Last week, tenants at City Park Apartments, located in Salt Lake City, received a "Facebook Addendum" posted on their doors, outlining what's expected of them.The predictable results are already rolling in.I don t want to be forced to be someone s friend and be threatened to break my lease because of that, tenant Jason Ring told KSL-TV.In general, contracts that require customers to give up their rights to review services haven't held up in court.In 2003, a New York judge found that a contract barring customers from publishing reviews of software programs "without prior consent" violated that state's unfair competition law.
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