ZHENGZHOU, China—Everywhere Li Dong looks these days, he sees two four-letter words: Oppo and Vivo.On billboards and bus stops, and on TV and social media, the two smartphone companies—which share an owner—are engaged in the kind of advertising blitz rarely seen in China s mobile sector.The ads are all over town, with the Oppo catchphrase, Charge your phone for five minutes, talk for two hours, said Mr. Li, a 25-year-old factory worker in this central Chinese city.The brands owner, BBK Electronics Co., is a Guangdong manufacturer little known outside of China.Oppo sells high-end smartphones with advanced cameras and luxe metal bodies in colors like gold and rose gold.Vivo sells lower-priced devices aimed at young consumers.
ZHENGZHOU, China—Early one day last week, a 31-year-old man finished his night shift on an iPhone assembly line, climbed to the top floor of Foxconn Technology Group 2354 -0.35 % s L03 production building and leapt to his death.He had been on the job for a month.The next day, Aug. 19, another Foxconn worker was struck by a train and killed.The two deaths in the northern Chinese city of Zhengzhou—where Foxconn runs Apple Inc. AAPL -1.14 % s main site for iPhone production—came under completely different circumstances.But to the tens of thousands of workers who have joined the factory ranks in recent weeks to assemble Apple s next-generation iPhone, the deaths are a reminder of the stresses and hazards that can come with the factory jobs promoted to poor Chinese here and in other manufacturing centers as a ticket to the middle class.Why is it always the entry-level workers who jump?
Male and female employees at plant used to make Samsung and Apple smartphones die within a day of each other.Consumer electronics manufacturer Foxconn is in the headlines again with two more employee deaths occurring in two days.Foxconn, manufacturer to the likes of Apple and Samsung, has confirmed that two of its employees at its China factory have died in unrelated incidents – one of which occurred close by one of its factories.The Taiwanese consumer electronics producer, which has been in the spotlight in the past over employee suicides, is under investigation over these latest deaths, and has said it is cooperating with authorities.Foxconn announced that a male employee was found dead outside one of its production line buildings in Zhengzhou on Thursday 18 August 2016 , while a female employee died in a train accident on her way to work the following day.The company did not give further details over the circumstances of the deaths except that they occurred on different dates and in unrelated conditions.
There are so many great aerial shots of China in this video by Stef Hoffer that I think my mind just teleported there.It s not just the pretty stuff either; the video is especially great because it shows many different sides of China, from the natural beauty of the country to the smoggy life in the cities and all that s in between: sand dunes, solar panels, rice terraces, ghost cities, shanty towns, and more.If you re curious, here are the places that were featured:Zhangjiajie national park, the Yangtze River Three Gorges , Dunhuang sand dunes and solar panels , Guazhou wind turbines , Hebei province Great Wall of China , Dazhai Dragon s Backbone rice terraces , Fujian province Hakka tulou round houses , Pingyao, Changsha Mao Zedong memorial , Liaoning province several industrial sites and ghost cities , Guangzhou Evergrande football stadium , Hong Kong, Shanghai, Jishou Aizhai bridge , Hainan island, Chongqing, Guilin, Jiuzhaigou national park, Zhengzhou, Linxia golden domed mosque , Zhangye national park, Macau, Hukou waterfalls, and Shenzhen.The video was shot with a DJI Phantom 4.
We ve covered the reasons why making an iPhone in the US doesn t make sense before, but a new report from The New York Times highlights a new factor: Huge incentives and concessions made by the Chinese government.The Times report profiles a Foxconn plant in Zhengzhou, China.It s the world s largest iPhone facility, making about half of all iPhones globally.What s notable about the factory isn t its scale, but how much money the Chinese government has given Foxconn to make the factory the ideal place to make iPhones.The Times was unable to pinpoint exactly how much the Chinese government has given for the Zhengzhou plant, but it reports:The confidential government records obtained by The Times detail multiple meetings over several years in which Zhengzhou city officials discussed their support for iPhone production, calling the benefits a preferential policy.
Enlarge / The iPhone 6S Plus and 7 Plus.Andrew CunninghamConfidential government records obtained by the reveal, among other things, that the city of Zhengzhou helped finance the construction of Foxconn's factory and housing for its workers; that it provides discounted energy and constructed power generators and other infrastructure to support the facility; that it has waived and deeply cut corporate and value-added taxes; that it helps Foxconn hire and train workers; that it put its factory inside a "bonded zone" that made selling devices within China easier; and that it spent a total of $10 billion to upgrade an airport to make exporting products from China quicker and easier for Apple and other companies.
Reports emerged last month claiming Apple had asked its two iPhone manufacturing partners to investigate what it would take to move the handsets assembly from China to the US.But despite the transfer being one of Donald Trump s pre-election promises, production seems certain to stay in Asia, thanks to the numerous incentives offered by the Chinese government.Last month, the Nikkei Asian Review claimed Foxconn has been studying the possibility of opening US-based iPhone-manufacturing facilities.But a new, in-depth investigation by the The New York Times highlights why such a move is highly unlikely.The report looks at the giant Foxconn factory in the city of Zhengzhou, which locals call iPhone city.When running at full capacity, the facility, which already produces half the world s iPhones, can churn out 500,000 Apple handsets a day.
Taiwan s Foxconn, the electronics manufacturing giant that builds Apple s iPhone along with dozens of other devices, has recently revealed its plans to eventually replace all the human workers in its Chinese factories with automated robots.This goal is to be accomplished over three phases, with 40,000 robots already in place on production lines, and a reduction of over half the company s workforce since the release of the iPhone 6 in 2014.Speaking to DigiTimes, Dai Jia-peng, the general manager of Foxconn s Automation Technology Development Committee, explains that the first phase involves the use of robots at individual workstations, completing tasks that are too dangerous or the most unpleasant for human workers.The second phase, on the other hand, involves a reduction in the use of robots as individual replacements, instead using fully automated production lines.Eventually this will lead to phase three, which will see not just production lines but entire factories automated, with only a minimal number of human workers for tasks including logistics, testing and inspection.Foxconn s factories in Chengdu, Shenzhen, and Zhengzhou are already at various steps in phases two and three, with up to 10 fully automated production lines in operation across different locations.
foxconn's workforce is counted in the millions, but in the future, it may be considerably less.Since several years back, the company holds on to introduce robots in the production of, among other things, the Iphone, and the company wants to continue the development.later Today, Foxconn to test the fully automated production lines in several factories in China, even if the tour has not so far come to the Iphone factory in Zhengzhou.It is a line that manufactures all-in-one computers to another company, writes Digitimes.the Vision for the future is factories where people just put their foot for roles other than production, inspection, logistics and testing.A buzz surrounding Apple in recent months has been the opportunity to spend part of the Iphone production in the united states, and it has been reported that Foxconn is investigating the possibilities.
Enlarge / The iOS version of The New York Times app.Andrew CunninghamChina has become a very important territory for Apple's bottom line in the last couple of years, though 2016's sales .The country also plays a large part in the manufacturing of Apple's hardware— the billions of dollars in benefits and subsidies that China and the city of Zhengzhou have provided to Apple's manufacturing partner Foxconn.These reasons make it beneficial for Apple to play ball with Chinese authorities and make and .But there have been other censorship-related clashes, like when China just a few months after allowing them to open.Apple has also to the country.
Over in China law enforcement has a new weapon in the war against crime, and its name is the AnBot!The AnBot isn t really a Robocop as such as is actually more like an automated mall cop/security guard, and has already been deployed in Zhengzhou East train station.This is the first autonomous security robot that has seen action in China and features face recognition features, facial scanning the ability to charge itself and even an air quality sensor.Anbot measures just 149cm tall and weighs in at 78kg boasting a top speed of 11mph.The black and white bot started work on 17th Feb and is charged with scanning faces and passing on information that is deemed necessary.The robot is also used during the evening where it can patrol and report crimes, fires or emergencies.We wonder if this wheeled Robocop is just the start of a new wave or robotic emergency workers and ask just how long it will take before similar machines are armed and given more Policing powers.Share this:TweetMorePocketShare on TumblrEmailPrint
While Elon Musk is running around cautioning the world about the real danger of Skynet-style warrior robots, Jack Ma would like you to consider another possible problem: CEOs might lose their overpaid gigs and there will be no golden parachute.Well, let’s be honest, there probably will be a golden parachute... somehow.Ma, the chairman of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, spoke at an entrepreneurship conference in Zhengzhou, China this weekend and he urged the crowd to wake up to what’s happening in AI and automation.“Fifteen years ago I gave speeches 200 or 300 times reminding everyone the Internet will impact all industries, but people didn’t listen because I was a nobody,” he told attendees.Artificial intelligence and other technologies will cause people “more pain than happiness” over the next three decades, according to Jack Ma, the billionaire chairman and founder of Alibaba.“Social conflicts in the next three decades will have an impact on all sorts of industries and walks of life,” said Ma ... A key social conflict will be the rise of artificial intelligence and longer life expectancy, which will lead to an aging workforce fighting for fewer jobs.
Watch out, human chief executive officers of companies, your job could be gone in 30 years, says Alibaba founder and executive chairman Jack Ma.Ma, who was speaking at an entrepreneurship conference in Zhengzhou, China, said that AI would be able to make calculations and decisions more rationally than humans, and wouldn't be swayed by emotions when compared to the human equivalent, reported The Guardian.Ma also warned that social conflicts would result from artificial intelligence taking over jobs, leaving an aging workforce competing for a diminishing number of jobs and would cause "more pain than happiness."The Alibaba founder isn't the first tech expert to warn of the perils of artificial intelligence.Tesla's Elon Musk as well as famed physicist Stephen Hawking have all spoken out against the perils of AI, while Musk has set up a fund to ensure that AI research doesn't get out of hand and wipe out humanity.Virtual reality 101: CNET tells you everything you need to know about VR.
While Elon Musk is running around cautioning the world about the real danger of Skynet-style warrior robots, Jack Ma would like you to consider another possible problem: CEOs might lose their overpaid gigs and there will be no golden parachute.Well, let’s be honest, there probably will be a golden parachute... somehow.Ma, the chairman of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, spoke at an entrepreneurship conference in Zhengzhou, China this weekend and he urged the crowd to wake up to what’s happening in AI and automation.“Fifteen years ago I gave speeches 200 or 300 times reminding everyone the Internet will impact all industries, but people didn’t listen because I was a nobody,” he told attendees.Artificial intelligence and other technologies will cause people “more pain than happiness” over the next three decades, according to Jack Ma, the billionaire chairman and founder of Alibaba.“Social conflicts in the next three decades will have an impact on all sorts of industries and walks of life,” said Ma ... A key social conflict will be the rise of artificial intelligence and longer life expectancy, which will lead to an ageing workforce fighting for fewer jobs.
p Xiaomi is expanding its offline stores all over the Eastern region and today the company announced that their 100th Mi Home store opened in China, fulfilling the promise that the company’s CEO Lei Jun had made almost one year ago.Today the same man, confirmed that Xiaomi will be opening 200 more stores in China (and relevant regions), further expanding their network of offline stores.Note, that the 100th store followed the opening of four new shops in Zhengzhou, Guangzhou, Foshan and Shanghai.The achievement is coming just five months after the 50th Mi home store was opened in December.Currently Xiaomi has Mi Home stores in most major Chinese cities, such as Beijing, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Nanjing, Chengdu, Hangzho, Wuhan, Zhuzhai, Zhengzhou, Changsha, Wuxi, Dongguan, Jinan, Dalian, Xiamen, Qingdao, Shenyang and others.In these stores people can buy all Xiaomi products – not only smartphones- such as accessories and other Xiaomi gadgets, but also receive technical support from experts.
ZHENGZHOU, China—Farmer Zhang Hailin remembers the day in 2010 when he watched as helicopters flew in over fields of corn and wheat here, hovering in spots to drop balloon-shaped markers.“Three days later, a hundred bulldozers were here,” Mr. Zhang...
After several tragic deaths and countless headaches for municipal authorities caused by the bike rental boom, the first guidelines for regulating bike rental for the whole of China have officially been published (in Chinese).The “guiding opinions on encouraging and regulating the development of bicycle rental” were signed by 20 state departments after the draft was submitted to the public for review by the Ministry of Transportation in May.The guidelines aim to rein in the disorderly expansion of shared bikes by major companies such as ofo, Mobike, Bluegogo, and others.The most recent case in the media (in Chinese) was in Zhengzhou, Henan province, where the local police brought in representatives from Mobike, ofo and Coolqi to give them a lecture on how to manage their bikes.Apparently, the 390,000 bikes in the city caused chaos on the streets both for pedestrians and other vehicles.Bicycles were piled up in front of subway exits, bus stations, and other highly frequented areas, leading to safety hazards.
Apple Inc.’s new iPhone, which is expected to be unveiled Tuesday, was plagued by production glitches early in the manufacturing process this summer, according to people familiar with the situation, which could result in extended supply shortfalls and shipping delays when customers start ordering the device later this month.But if shortfalls of the new phone extend beyond the initial sales period, which is expected to begin September 22, they could weaken analysts’ and investors’ projections for sales in the crucial holiday period.The production glitches led to a setback of about a month in the manufacturing timetable.Foxconn Technology Group, the Apple contractor that assembles iPhones, has been ramping up production at its manufacturing complex in Zhengzhou, China.The company is paying bonuses to employees who can help bring new hires on board at its Zhengzhou plant, which Foxconn said in June employs about 250,000 people.Investors, betting the new phone will rejuvenate Apple’s sales after a recent slump, have pushed Apple’s share price to record highs in recent months.
Yoko Kubota, Tripp Mickle, and Takashi Mochizuki, reporting for WSJ: Apple's new iPhone, which is expected to be unveiled Tuesday, was plagued by production glitches early in the manufacturing process this summer, according to people familiar with the situation, which could result in extended supply shortfalls and shipping delays when customers start ordering the device later this month (alternative source).New iPhones are typically in short supply when first released.But if shortfalls of the new phone extend beyond the initial sales period, which is expected to begin September 22, they could weaken analysts' and investors' projections for sales in the crucial holiday period.The production glitches led to a setback of about a month in the manufacturing timetable.Foxconn, the Apple contractor that assembles iPhones, has been ramping up production at its manufacturing complex in Zhengzhou, China.The company is paying bonuses to employees who can help bring new hires on board at its Zhengzhou plant, which Foxconn said in June employs about 250,000 people.
Chinese smartphone manufacturer, Xiaomi, which is dubbed China’s Apple, is known for its cheap devices which have turned out to be durable and trustworthy.This company which initially focused online flash sales turned to the old-fashioned retail method after it experienced a decline in sales.A few weeks ago, 16 new Mi stores were unveiled on the same day but it appears that the company is not satisfied because presently, 20 more Xiaomi Mi stores are due for opening on the 1st of October which happens to be China’s National Day.Xiaomi CEO, Lei Jun, announced today that the new stores will be located in the following citiesBeijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Wuhan, Zhengzhou, Hangzhou (two), Tianjin, Dalian, Nanchang, Nantong, Quanzhou, Harbin, Chaozhou, Dongyang, Hengyang, Guangzhou, Shanwei, Qujing.Cities like Zhengzhou will be having its fourth Mi store soon and the likes of Beijing is also not new to Mi stores.
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