These unique Airbnb rentals in New York's Hudson Valley are all super cozy, affordable, and a great base for savoring fall foliage and winter scenery.
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As I took a nighttime walk with my 13-year-old son, ten days into the pandemic, I asked him why he wanted his dad to move into our basement. He launched into a pitch citing statistics and facts about how “particulate could penetrate hospital masks,” until I interrupted him.“Can you tell me from your emotions? Don’t talk from your brain.”We walked for about 20 seconds before his voice went soft and sincere. “I’m worried he’ll get sick and I’m worried about him on his own. I know him, solitude doesn’t suit him.”When my partner left me after 28 years, I was devastated. He made me feel small, betrayed and helpless. The last thing I wanted at that uncertain time was to share a home again with my own private Thanos. But hearing this, bam, just like that, I unlocked the door to the AirBnB in the house my ex and I were fighting over.The night before he moved in, I closed my eyes and said out loud to the empty room we had once shared: “I’m going to take this opportunity to create a better, more respectful relationship with my ex.” My ex moved in on a Thursday. We were at each other’s throats by Monday.We may never have another opportunity to renew our friendship, I reasoned, or to be the parents our son needs. Most of all, I wanted to keep our son safe. As infections and death tolls around the world mounted, I didn’t want my son travelling back and forth across the city just because we have shared custody.I was scared and needed my child close by. The problem was that my kid was also frightened, and he wanted his dad there, too.My ex moved in on a Thursday. We were at each other’s throats by Monday.My coddling and his short fuse all felt like deja vu, but this time around I knew what was behind the compulsive cleaning and grammar-correcting that he used to vent his frustrations. This time I didn’t try to make him happy.Soon, the quibbling became part of the lockdown routine. There was nothing to be late for, no pick ups or drop offs — just endless days of computer screens, hand wringing and pacing through rooms that, up until recently, had felt cleansed of the hurt left over from the end of our marriage.My chest felt tight and I stopped sleeping. My eyes would snap open in the middle of the night and I’d picture him two floors below, in my house, again. Mornings became a time of anxiety knowing we’d soon come face to face.I recognized the person I was becoming. It was me from two years ago, from a decade ago, when our relationship was a source of constant anxiety. This was the me that needed to be heard and believed. “Reframe it,” I thought. “It’s a gift, and it may never happen again.”Nonetheless, many days into it I told him I was afraid he was going to leave us again. As it slipped out of my mouth, I realized that I wanted him to stay. Maybe to help parent, to live through this crisis — to be my ally — so I wasn’t alone in the most uncertain time of all our lives. But what I saw was someone far more afraid than I was that I might still want him. I could tell he was keeping more than his social distance from me. He had never had a friend like me, even though I considered him my best friend at one time. He still couldn’t seem to see how amazing the world was, or I was; only the faults. Sometimes our laughter came easily, and it all almost felt normal.In the weeks after our split, I got a dog – a sort of “divorce support animal” — so there was this crazy-ass pit bull around all the time. I could tell my ex had a soft spot for her. One day, I asked him how it felt to play with her or pet her. “I’m just trying to help with your stupid dog,” he scoffed. But, I could see it. I got this dog to rescue me and my son, and now it appeared she was also rescuing him. Very slowly.That day, I allowed myself to feel a little bit of optimism. Being stuck together in lockdown began to feel like a metaphor for the inescapable responsibility we shared as our son’s parents. We started to play Dungeons and Dragons as a family, and video games where each character must cooperate to complete the quest. We began to make dinners together, and play with the dog.When it was just me and my ex, we talked of anti-racism, and J.K. Rowling’s missteps, and the Spanish Flu, and the end of fossil fuels. Once we quietly contemplated our fears, whispering of things that once seemed so far away, but were now as real and alarming as the upcoming school term.Sometimes, our laughter came easily, and it all almost felt normal. But other times, it was self-conscious and awkward.“We need to go back to doing things separately. We can’t ‘play house’ anymore.”I hope that one day my son will look back on this time and realise that his parents did a great thing for him.My ex’s sharp words stung like a slap across the face. I had asked him if he wanted to go to a cottage with me and our son for a few days, after what had felt like a period of relative calm. We avoided each other that night. Finally, I allowed his rebuke to sink in: We were not a family, not even a strange one.Ontario entered Stage 2 of lockdown in June. In July, Stage 3 began. The initial panic of the pandemic started to subside, and my ex packed up his bags for the second time in our lives.We had lived through pain, tears, screaming matches, recycling, diapers, laughter, music and, yes, love for 28 years. Then he left. Then he came back. And after three months of infection rates, Zoom calls, online math quizzes and dog walks, he was leaving again. This time, I was okay when he exited my life. I was whole. I can’t say how he felt, but I imagine his mood was a little bit lighter and that he enjoyed his own company a little bit more. I hope that one day my son will look back on this time and realise that his parents did a great thing for him, something my parents, many parents, would not have done.This article first appeared on HuffPost Canada PersonalMore from HuffPost UK Personal Sex After Miscarriage Is Hard. This Is How We Got Back Into The Swing Coronavirus Stole My Favourite Pastime: Chatting With Strangers Society Expects Black Single Mums To Fail. I Won’t Be Written Off
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The 2019 calendar year will long be remembered in the eyes of public market watchers as the year of WeWork. Once billed as the most valuable startup in the United States, the company unraveled in dramatic fashion after filing its S-1 with the SEC, thanks to numerous issues with the company's business model and management practices.This event, along with a succession of dud listings from such big names as Slack and Uber, spooked the markets, with IPO registration withdrawals up almost 50 percent in 2019, according to research firm Renaissance Capital. This left a sizeable backlog of potential listings for 2020, with the holiday rental company Airbnb headlining that list.To read this article in full, please click here
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Whether you're craving a woodsy hike, fall foliage, planning to hit the slopes in winter, there's plenty to do in Vermont, and an Airbnb to match.
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“Wow, what a time to arrive,” chuckled the 7-Eleven shop assistant as he looked out of the store windows to the semi-darkness outside. We smiled ruefully in response. It was 2pm.Moving continents in the midst of a pandemic has not been without its challenges, so when we touched down in San Francisco last Tuesday it already felt like we’d done the hard yards.That evening we arrived in Palo Alto in preparation for my wife’s new job at Stanford University. Predictably, I woke prematurely the following morning due to jet lag. Looking through the slats in the blinds of our Airbnb, the sky had an unmistakable orange hue. I assumed it must be sunrise and privately congratulated myself for having the good fortune to witness such a delightful Californian welcome.But as I lay there over the next 30 minutes, the light didn’t alter. I looked at my phone and was disconcerted to see the weather forecast wasn’t predicting sunshine, but smoke. I didn’t even know that was a setting. During the hours that followed, rather than getting lighter, the sky turned redder and darker. By the afternoon, California’s wildfires had caused the sky to resemble the angry, dying light of a distant sunset.While we were taken aback by the colour of the sky, we assumed that this had perhaps been a common side effect of the fires that had featured in the news bulletins of recent weeks. We didn’t want to reinforce the British stereotype of always talking about the weather the first day we got there, so instead deployed another and adopted a stiff upper lip.However, as we walked into town it was clear this was unusual by anyone’s standards. The main street has been temporarily pedestrianised to allow restaurants to arrange tables – all two metres apart of course – on the road so businesses can operate outdoors while indoor dining is prohibited. Few people were tempted by the prospect of al fresco dining though. It was hard to blame them; the epicentre of Silicon Valley suddenly looked like it belonged in an episode of Black Mirror.It’s safe to say this wasn’t how we had pictured our first day. It was both sad and unsettling to see our new hometown, which evidently had so much going for it, almost devoid of life under an ominous, otherworldly sky that was in equal parts compelling and intimidating.The drama of Wednesday’s radiant sky hasn’t been replicated since, but the air quality has worsened considerably. As the San Francisco Bay Area is surrounded by forest fires, it’s afflicted by the smoke regardless of which way the wind blows and, on Friday, California had the poorest air quality of anywhere in the world.Health warnings were issued advising residents to “stay inside, keep windows and doors closed, and keep your indoor air purified.” Some office workers received free respirators from their employers while a staff member at Stanford University used the institution’s online forum to enquire about the “best ways to remove hot ash from outside work surfaces”.As new arrivals, we were ill-prepared for the smoke’s detrimental health effects and have neither respirators nor indoor air purifiers. Without them it’s impossible to avoid the harmful particles that irritate your airways.The fires in California are the worst on record. In total six of the largest 20 blazes ever recorded in the state are currently raging and, with several weeks of the wildfire season remaining, three million acres of forestry have already been destroyed.The previous record was 1.8million acres, which burned during the devastating wildfires of 2018. During those months, many residents bought respirators to cope with the poor air quality and so are better equipped to deal with the pollutants in the air this time around. As new arrivals, we were ill-prepared for the smoke’s detrimental health effects and have neither respirators nor indoor air purifiers. Without them it’s impossible to avoid the harmful particles that irritate your airways. Upon our return from brief trips outside for food, our throats feel sore, so it’s disconcerting to reflect that the air quality is probably not much better in the small converted garage that we now call home.Putting aside the elephant in the room of the glowing orange sky above, the other observation we made on Tuesday was that everyone in Palo Alto wears masks – even to walk along the street. This is because, back in May, Palo Alto city council issued an emergency order requiring all members of the public to wear face coverings outside their home. This strong stance was in stark contrast to the numerous government U-turns back home.Before we arrived we’d read that California had the highest number of Covid-19 infections of any state in the US. We had also seen coverage of the vehement protests in the country opposing the lockdown restrictions. So we anticipated there would be some fairly liberal interpretations of the rules. Yet it has been quite the opposite.We’re keen to meet our neighbours properly, but they have a one-month-old baby and are understandably cautious given the maelstrom around us. As a result of the pandemic and the wildfires, we can neither meet our prospective friends inside nor out, so for now, we merely wave at each other from the window.Settling in a new country is never easy, and the unique circumstances have added additional challenges. Though it has bought us time to overcome the jet lag, it feels strange to move to a faraway land with so much to offer, and have to sit inside as the Golden State burns around us.Chris Atkin is a freelance journalist. Follow him on Twitter at @chrisjatHave a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal Oregon Wildfires Are Decimating Homes Near Me And I'm Terrified About What's Next I’m A White Teacher. This Is How I’m Bringing Anti-Racism Into My Classroom I Spent Three Years Homeless. In This Pandemic, No One Should Be Sleeping Rough
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TLDR: The Complete Ruby on Rails 6 Bootcamp Certification Bundle explains the powerful Ruby language from the ground up, including valuable project exercises. When you decide to get into coding, learning the programming language Ruby and its most popular framework Rails is probably not at the top of your to-do list. After 15 years, Ruby on Rails just doesn’t have the same cache of buzzier languages like Java or Python. But despite the sleepy profile, Ruby is not a coding choice to be dismissed lightly. With over 1 million websites driven by Ruby on Rails, including Airbnb, Hulu, Basecamp and… This story continues at The Next Web
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When many employers were forced to go fully remote in March they had to find new ways to keep workers engaged.
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TurnKey Vacation Rentals includes thousands of well-appointed homes across the US with standard policies for COVID, cleanings, and cancellations.
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“I love you, you’re perfect, but could you please wear a mask more often?” In the age of coronavirus, many couples have been getting into arguments about their exposure comfort level and their willingness to take risks: Should we rent a nearby Airbnb for a staycation or stick it out at home? Should we let the kids go back to school or keep on homeschooling? Should we let our parents come over or just FaceTime them again? Should we dine on a patio at a local restaurant or is it still too unsafe? “How to deal with the stress of the restrictions and mandates is coming up with everyone, but especially couples,” said Kurt Smith, a therapist. In the last few months, Smith has heard it all as it relates to Covid-19: spouses who aren’t on the same page with their risk analysis, couples fighting over how to keep their kids safe, partners debating how to stay financially afloat as mortgage payments and credit card bills come in.“Quite a few people are dealing with having less income than they had earlier in the year,” Smith said. “I’ve had patients who’ve had their hours cut, lost jobs, or have chosen not to work.”Last week, one client told Smith that she’s resistant to going back to work as a teacher’s aide, worried that she’ll get sick if she goes in. Her husband is understanding but after five months of being the sole financial provider for the family, he’s getting less patient. “The loss of family income and her unwillingness to consider any other option than stay at home and wait this out hasn’t gone over well with her husband,” Smith said. “He’s trying to be supportive, but the decision not to work makes him feel they aren’t a team in this area.”Masks are a particularly prickly subject for couples. (No surprise, since studies have shown that men are more likely to opt out than women, believing masks to be “shameful,” “a sign of weakness” and “not cool.” This, despite the data showing that men are at higher risk than women of dying from the coronavirus.)“A guy told me yesterday that he and his wife were fighting this week about wearing a mask,” Smith said. “Where, when, how often are common conflicts between partners over masks as individuals see the risks differently. Another couple fought about the purchase of masks ― not about buying them, but about what kind and how much to spend.”Many couples aren’t equipped to handle the sustained stress the pandemic has brought, especially if their communication skills were lacking in healthier times. “Relationships that were not in a good place before the coronavirus have been really hit hard by the stay-at-home orders and months and months of restrictions,” Smith said. Coronavirus concerns can put a spotlight on a host of underlying relationship issues, said Jennifer Chappell Marsh, a marriage and family therapist in San Diego. She pointed to differing values (Are you a rule follower or anti-authoritarian?), matters of trust (Can I depend on you to keep me safe?) and yes, poor communication skills. “Plus, because of the coronavirus threat, it’s more likely for each partner to get flooded with anxiety triggering the ‘fight or flight’ mode when they’re reacting to these fights,” she said. “It causes both people to be out of control.”And of course, having children complicates these issues even further, Chappell Marsh said. “Parents are dealing with the added stress of economic uncertainty and meeting their child’s needs with schools closed and child care options limited,” she said. “For those who already had differing viewpoints on childrearing decisions, those differences are exacerbated by the fear, anxiety and realities surrounding the coronavirus.”Unfortunately, the threat of Covid-19 doesn’t seem to be going away any time soon. So how do couples at odds over exposure and risk reconcile their differences before those differences get worse? Below, marriage therapists offer the advice they’re giving their clients right now. Don’t fight in the heat of the moment. Talk about it later, when cooler heads prevail. Maybe you’re bothered that your spouse just sprung it on you that he wants to take you and the kids boating with a co-worker this weekend. You might be fuming ― “We haven’t even seen our relatives in months. What makes you think I want to break quarantine by hanging out with Kevin and his family?” ― but slow down. There’s no urgent need to talk about it right then and there.When conflict arises, don’t blow up or stonewall your spouse. Plan a mutually agreed-upon time to talk like cool, calm and collected adults, Chappell Marsh said. “Identify a time when you can both come to the table with a clearer head,” she said. “The best time to talk is when both parties are calmer and there are little distractions to discuss the issues. Couples with small children find more success when they talk during child nap time or after the kids go to bed.”Make a genuine effort to understand your partner’s concerns about socialising. Your goal going into any conversation this delicate should be mutual understanding: If your partner is hesitant to go back to work or send the kids back to school, ask yourself where those feelings might be coming from before trying to solve the issue at hand, said Kelifern Pomeranz, a psychologist in Menlo Park, California. “Listen to your partner with generosity, curiosity, and in the spirit of connection,” she said. “You want to ask open-ended questions (‘Can you say more about what you are afraid of?’) to learn more about your partner’s beliefs, what is important to them, their concerns and their needs.”Put aside judgment and defensiveness for this talk. “This is about understanding your partner more fully and deeply, not about being right or trying to convince your partner of your position,” she said. Start the conversation on common ground.Begin by identifying what is mutually important to you as a couple, Chappell Marsh said. Make a list of what you both can agree on surrounding the issue. For instance, you might disagree on whether you should hang out at someone else’s home, but agree that a socially distant picnic outside or a hike with masks on most of the time is fine.“This approach is more likely to set the stage for cooperation and teamwork vs. feeling like your partner is working against you,” she said. Then, brainstorm a variety of possible solutions where you both can get your needs met, Pomeranz said. For instance, maybe you Google socially distant events and agree that it’s probably safe to watch a concert or movie in a drive-thru setting. “Be creative,” Pomeranz added. “The answer might be something neither of you have ever previously considered.” Choose a solution that feels good to both of you.If you don’t both feel happy at the end of a conversation like this, you haven’t done it right.“Both partners should feel like they were seen, heard, and their opinion matters,” Pomeranz said. “The solution should feel satisfying for both of you. If only one of you feels like you’ve won at the end of the discussion, then you have both lost.”If the conversation is a success, it will feel more like a collaboration than a compromise, the therapist said.“Compromise often means giving up something important to each of you in order to reach an agreement,” she said. “With collaboration, partners work together to develop a solution that feels like a win-win for both individuals.” Related... 20 Things We've All Learned From Am I Making You Uncomfortable? This Is How Our Bad Sex Education Shaped My Sexuality 35 Meaningful Questions To Ask Your Grandparents Also on HuffPost
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It’s been a rollercoaster year for Airbnb and its much-anticipated plans for an initial public offering or IPO. The home-sharing platform had planned to file back in March to go public but then coronavirus hit and its revenue nose-dived. Now, it looks like plans are back on track. Airbnb confidentially filed its IPO paperwork with the securities and exchange commission in mid-August. None of the financial specifics were revealed but the company was valued at US$18 billion in its last funding round in April, which is a long way down from its previous 2017 valuation of US$31 billion. Of course,… This story continues at The Next Web
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Brits are getting adventurous with accommodation for their staycation holidays, with more people looking for unique boltholes and beds for the night.According to Air BnB, cabins, treehouses and farm stays have been the most searched-for unique homes on the platform. But people are also searching for boats, yurts and even private islands. They know how to holiday. If you’re keen to give your staycation a little upgrade, have a look at the top 10 quirky Airbnb stays for your future trip.Related... Forget The Hotspots, Here's How To Plan A Day Trip That Delivers The Rowan Yurt, Holmfirth, YorkshireIt’s like camping, with a bit of pizazz. This glamping yurt is set in a woodland on the edge of farmland in the Yorkshire Pennine hills. You’ll get your own stove, private kitchen and bathroom – and a hot tub. We’re sold.Prices from £120 a night. Treehouse Retreat, Elham, East KentYou can sleep up to two guests in this actual treehouse – a childhood dream. The space is nested up in between three sturdy oak trees and the house itself is made from recycled timbers. You’ll get lush views of the north downs from your windows. There’s a heater and double glazing so you won’t get too cold, plus a space to cook, a Nespresso machine (yay) and a music system.Prices from £99 a night. Lighthouse Keeper’s Cottage, Tobermory, ScotlandYou don’t get to stay in the actual lighthouse, but you’ll be very nearby. The former Lighthouse Keeper’s Cottage is in a really remote location on the Isle of Mull – if you’re looking for some peace and quiet. It can take up to six guests, and you access it by foot via a coastal footpath walk from Tobermory. You couldn’t get much more secluded if you tried.   Prices from £152 a night. Wooden Cabin On Secluded Island, Badachro, ScotlandThere are a few things you need to know about this cottage, according to the owners: there’s a difficult climb down to the island; it has a detached toilet and shower; and there’s limited heating in the winter months. Still keen? You’ll be holidaying in complete privacy in a gorgeous, green wooden cabin cottage for you and one other. Oh, and torches are provided free of charge. Prices from £150 a night. Bubble Den, Portglenone, Northern IrelandThis is as cool as it looks. It sleeps two people and you can literally sleep under the stars as the outer layer of the den is transparent – yep, people will be able to see you too, but it’s pretty remote so that shouldn’t be a problem. One reviewer even called the stay “flawless”, so we’d say it’s up there as one of the best. Prices from £165 a night.Riverside Cabin, Constantine, CornwallThis hand-built home sleeps up to four guests and is surrounded by woodland (like many of these unique retreats).You will wake up to the sound of the wind in the leaves, and tinkling water and the crackling fire to relax you. It has a fire pit for outdoor cooking and a stream to paddle in. Prices from £125 a night. Secluded Airship, Drimnin, ScotlandYes, you really can stay in an airship. It’s an “iconic, insulated aluminium pod designed by Roderick James with views of the Sound of Mull from dragonfly windows”, according to the owners. Gaze at the stars and enjoy some breathtaking views. Prices from £150 a night. Castle, Portpatrick, ScotlandYou might have noticed the slight pattern here... that a lot of the quirky UK Airbnbs are in Scotland. So maybe it’s time to take a trip? This is a private and self-contained apartment inside an Edwardian historic castle. There are four bedrooms, three bathrooms, and it sleeps eight people comfortably. Prices from £97 a night. Luxury Cabin, HerefordshireThis modern cabin is on the corner of an organic farm – you get your own veranda and a private hot tub (which is always a selling point, let’s be honest). It’s a five minute walk to the market town of Kington, with eight pubs to choose from. What more could you want?Prices from £92 a night. Geodesic Dome, NorthumberlandThis site is completely off grid – there’s water in containers, solar power, and a composting toilet. So you’ll have a complete back-to-basics experience here but hey, we all need to switch off once in a while don’t we? Added benefits include a fire pit, decking with beautiful views, and a wood-fired hot tub. Prices from £125 a night. Related... 11 Totally Invaluable Reviews Of UK Tourist Destinations For Your Staycation 5 Reasons You Should Book A Beach Staycation This Autumn The 'Work Staycation' Is On The Rise. Here's Why People Are Doing It
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Hello there!Yes, there are Airbnb for boats, and in fact, they are popularly sought after by many entrepreneurs for boat rental script development.The Airbnb for boats works pretty much like any other rental app.The user and the host can log in and create a profile using their details.The host uploads information, details, pictures, and videos of the boat they would like to rent.The users can search for the kind of boat they want based on their preferences using the filter.3.The host can accept the request based on their availability.4.
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These days, online business has gotten more upscale for entrepreneurs as every customer needs benefits at the doorstep.There are various new organizations and businesses who have done productive online business.Among the different businesses, starting with an online rental business is a decent idea regardless.For an entrepreneur in the first place there are a ton of opportunities to approach with the business thought of Airbnb and start your own online rental business.It has revealed a dynamic improvement in the online business where Airbnb business model is a real manual for perceive how it capacitiesHere are a part of the benefits of Airbnb clone script for an entrepreneur.Starting a rental business with Airbnb clone is more moderate for startup as opposed to starting without any arrangementIt gives uncommon flexibility the Airbnb clone app with improved client organization correspondenceUsing Airbnb script it gives different approaches to make pay or revenueWith the extension of the amount of customers and owners of the spot can help with making more revenue dependent on correspondence.How to make your Airbnb Clone more accommodating to customers when stood out from different Applications?Registration: Keep your application especially fundamental.Basic registration with online media join that consolidates google, facebook, instagram, etc.
Ackman said that merging with his record-size SPAC would offer Airbnb the certainty of $5 billion in cash and the chance to go public.
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Airbnb rolled out a COVID-19 Extenuating Circumstances policy for bookings with check-in dates through October 15. But it has some pretty big caveats.
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Branding Company In Mangalore is certainly a design city, and its agencies reflect that.This list is mostly designed to feature the agencies with the most experience in digital branding for products like Uber, Airbnb, Firefox, etc.we know how to deliver exceptional and measurable results for our clients across industries.2.Having faith in us, our clients allow our team to experiment with their online environment for possible results.SocioBliss team works under the strategic guidance of CEO Ms. Megha Bhati, the Digital Head of Sociobliss.We encourage our team to deliver their best performance and strictly comply with the organizational code of conduct.Increasing the ROI of brands and businesses and helping them stay ahead of the competition is what we strive to achieve, every day.4.
Airbnb Plus features vetted listings renowned for Instagram-worthy interiors and thoughtful amenities provided by hosts for a next-level stay.
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The home-rental giant said it still preferred entering public markets through a traditional IPO, Bloomberg reported.
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Bumble could seek an initial-public-offering valuation of $6 billion to $8 billion, Bloomberg reported.
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To get a refund from Airbnb, you should make your request before your stay begins — otherwise, head to the Airbnb Resolution Center online.
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While I was initially hesitant to stay in a large hotel during COVID-19, Four Seasons Westlake Village blew me away with their commitment to safety.
For a socially distant getaway in nature, these top-rated yurts on Airbnb and Vrbo are affordable and available to book this fall, and beyond.
Airbnb is making it easy for users to see right away if a home participates in its Enhanced Cleaning Initiative. Here's how it works.
DoorDash has 12 members of its Management Team, which are its top executives, including CEO Tony Xu. While the company has announced various members of that team over the years, it has never publicly compiled a list of them; Business Insider is publishing that list for the first time. The executive team has decades of tech-industry experience, helping manage companies ranging from Amazon to Uber; one member worked in the White House, while another has been dubbed the godfather of Google's AdSense product. The experience of the current team stands in contrast with the team that founded Palo Alto Delivery — DoorDash's precursor — some 8 years ago; at the time, Xu and his cofounders were all students and relatively little experience. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. When they founded Palo Alto Delivery — the company that became DoorDash — in 2012, Tony Xu, Stanley Tang, Andy Fang, and Evan Moore arguably had more energy than experience. Tang and Fang were still computer science undergraduates at Stanford with a handful of Facebook internships between them. Xu and Moore were both graduate students in the university's business school with a bit more real-world experience, but neither were exactly seasoned operators. But they made it work. Xu, his cofounders, and their early team transformed a local delivery service that served Stanford and nearby neighborhoods into a nationwide — even international — operation. However, as DoorDash has gotten bigger, Xu, its CEO from Day 1, has sought to bring in more experienced hands to help steer and manage the increasingly complex company. Today, the company's top ranks — dubbed its Management Team — are filled with managers who have long experience in the tech industry, having helped run companies including Uber, Google, Facebook, Tesla, Microsoft, and Groupon.   Those managers have helped DoorDash navigate the coronavirus crisis as well as numerous legal and technical challenges. They've also helped the company, last valued at $16 billion in a venture financing round in June, prepare for a possible initial public offering. While DoorDash has announced various hirings over the years, it's never made public a complete list of its Management Team. In an exclusive, Business Insider has compiled a list of its members. Here are DoorDash's 12 top executives:SEE ALSO: DoorDash, the $12.7 billion food-delivery startup, could make or break tech IPOs in 2020. Early investors explain why they backed the company and its founder. Tony Xu, CEO and cofounder Tony Xu launched Palo Alto Delivery, the precursor to DoorDash, in the fall of 2012 with fellow Stanford students Evan Moore, Stanley Tang, and Andy Fang. Their initial idea was to fill a gap in their local area — there weren't a lot of food delivery options for Stanford students or the surrounding community in Palo Alto, California. The team struggled a bit to figure out whether to focus on individual consumers or on catering to businesses. They eventually settled on delivering to consumers, changed the company's name to DoorDash, and started building what would become a multibillion-dollar company and the national leader in the food delivery business. A key part of Xu's strategy was to focus on other suburban areas like Palo Alto that were bereft of delivery options. Xu immigrated from China to the US with his parents when he was 5. He later worked in the kitchen of his mother's Chinese restaurant. Before cofounding DoorDash, he was part of the product team at Square, worked on special projects for the CEO and chief financial officer of eBay, and was a business analyst at consulting firm McKinsey. Andy Fang, chief technology officer and cofounder Andy Fang was a Stanford undergraduate student with little real-world business experience other than a pair of internships at Facebook when he teamed up with Tony Xu, Stanley Tang, and Evan Moore to found Palo Alto Delivery in the fall of 2012. After starting the service, which the team relaunched as DoorDash the following year, Fang reportedly served for a time as its lone delivery driver and worked with his cofounders to dispatch orders. In the early days, DoorDash's service was built around a simple website. But Fang, who graduated in 2014 from Stanford with a bachelor's of science in computer science, led the effort to build out a code base to serve as a foundation for its service. As DoorDash's CTO, Fang leads its engineering team and is responsible for overseeing the development of its technology. Stanley Tang, chief product officer and cofounder Stanley Tang was a classmate and former dorm mate of Andy Fang in Stanford's computer science department when they teamed up with graduate business students Tony Xu and Evan Moore to found DoorDash. Like Fang, Tang also worked a short stint at Facebook while still in school. But as a teenager, Fang wrote "eMillions: Behind-the-Scenes Stories of 14 Successful Internet Millionaires" in which he offered case studies of success in the new digital economy based on interviews with entrepreneurs. Along with Fang, Tang graduated from Stanford in 2014 — some two years after they launched DoorDash's predecessor — with a degree in computer science. But while Fang gravitated toward the code base, Tang took an interest in overseeing the design of its service and how customers and partners interacted with it. That remains his role as the company's chief product officer.   Christopher Payne, chief operating officer In 2016, three years after DoorDash formally launched and after several years of explosive growth, CEO Tony Xu was ready to bring in an experienced operator to help him scale up the business. He turned to Christopher Payne to fill that role. By that point, Payne had more than 25 years of operating experience, serving as a manager and vice president at Microsoft, Amazon, and eBay; the founder and CEO of a small software startup that was acquired by eBay; and, for a short time, as the CEO of Tinder. As DoorDash's COO, Payne oversees its marketing operations, its partnerships with restaurants and other merchants, and its interactions with couriers. Sarah Wagener, chief people officer Like Christopher Payne, Sarah Wagener was a well-seasoned executive before she joined DoorDash in 2018, having spent more than 20 years in human resources and recruiting, much of that in the tech industry. Immediately prior to joining the food-delivery company, she had been at Pandora for more than 5 years, first heading up its recruiting and diversity efforts and then its HR operations. Before that, she had stints at Facebook, Genentech, Bayer Healthcare, and staffing agency Aerotek. She oversees DoorDash's equivalent of a human resources department as its chief people officer.  Prabir Adarkar, chief financial officer Before he joined DoorDash in 2018 as its chief financial officer, Prabir Adarkar was a top finance official at another SoftBank-backed Silicon Valley unicorn — Uber. He had spent three years at the app-based taxi company, overseeing its financial planning and analysis and helping determine its pricing and the incentives it offered riders and drivers. Prior to Uber, Adarkar was an investment banker at Goldman Sachs, advising technology companies on mergers and acquisitions.  Keith Yandell, chief business and legal officer Keith Yandell has been a busy guy since joining DoorDash in 2016 as its chief business and legal officer. Soon after starting, he spearhead the company's first acquisition. He's also been a leading player in its fundraising efforts; just since he joined, the company's raised $2.7 billion, representing the vast majority of its total financing. Most notably, though, he's been the key figure in DoorDash's numerous legal scrapes. The company has battled with couriers, the city of San Francisco, and the state of California over whether such workers should be classified as employees or contractors; and with customers and the District of Columbia attorney general over allegedly misleading customers about who received the tips they paid. Yandell is helping lead the effort on behalf of the company to overturn California's Assembly Bill 5, which forces companies including DoorDash to classify their gig workers as employees. Yandell had plenty of experience dealing with legal controversies before he started at DoorDash. Like Prabir Adarkar, Yandell is a veteran of Uber, where he headed up the litigation team of the app-based taxi company that fought numerous legal battles with passengers, drivers, and regulators. Prior to that, he was a partner at Allen Matkins, where he tried numerous cases. Rajat Shroff, vice president of product management As DoorDash's vice president of product management, Rajat Shroff oversees the company's product management, product design, and product operations teams. He leads the company's effort to develop and build out products for consumers, retailer partners, and advertisers. Like Christopher Payne and Sarah Wagener, Rajat Shroff had a long history in tech prior to joining DoorDash in 2017. He came to the company from Groupon, where he'd similarly led its product management operation. Prior to that he'd been involved in or headed up product management efforts at a succession of companies, including Oracle and Brand.net. Liz Jarvis-Shean, vice president of communications and policy Liz Jarvis-Shean joined DoorDash last August as its first vice president of communications. In that role, she oversees its public-relations efforts. Jarvis-Shean is well-prepared to handle any flack, scrutiny, or publicity directed at or by DoorDash. She worked on Barack Obama's 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns and served as a special assistant to him in his first administration, helping push through the Affordable Care Act and the confirmations of two Supreme Court justices. She later headed up communications at Tesla as it was ramping up production of its first car, the Model S, preparing to launch its second, the Model X, and broke ground on its Gigafactory battery manufacturing plant. More recently, she was the head of communications at Airbnb at a time when the online travel company was starting to draw criticism that the short-term rental market it helped foster was leading to rising rents in many cities, including New York. Ryan Sokol, vice president of engineering Ryan Sokol has headed up DoorDash's engineering team since he joined in January last year as the company's vice president of engineering. After the company saw a surge in traffic this spring as governments barred in-person dining to combat the coronavrius pandemic, Sokol led an effort to overhaul DoorDash's technology systems to make them more reliable and better able to handle the demand. Sokol was well-prepared for the role, having worked in the tech industry as a consultant and manager for more than 20 years. Like Keith Yandell and Prabir Adarkar, Sokol joined DoorDash from Uber. While a director at the app-based taxi company, he oversaw the launch of UberEats and helped scale up its operations. He previously oversaw Uber's engineering team that focused on its core ride-sharing marketplace. Before Uber, Sokol had been head of engineering at communications app maker Voxxer and had served in a variety of roles at IBM, Genentech, and a variety of consulting firms. Gokul Rajaram, Caviar Lead When DoorDash acquired rival Caviar from Square last year, it got with the deal not only someone who was intimately familiar with the high-end food delivery business, but someone who was something of a star manager as well. Gokul Rajaram has overseen Caviar — first for Square and now for DoorDash — since Square had acquired the company in 2014. But he's perhaps best known for being the so-called godfather of Google's AdSense product. He helped launch the search advertising feature, which transformed Google from a provider of a free search engine into a huge business. After he left Google, he founded Chai Labs, which was focused on helping companies in the travel, shopping, and entertainment industries create search-friendly content for their websites. When Facebook acquired Chai Labs, Rajaram, as its product direct for ads, helped build the social networking company's advertising business into the behemoth it became. Tom Pickett, chief revenue officer Tom Pickett is the newest member of DoorDash's executive team, its first chief revenue officer, and the only member of its top management who doesn't report directly to CEO Tony Xu. Instead, Pickett, who joined the company this spring and oversees its interactions with merchants, reports to Chief Operating Officer Christopher Payne. Pickett is yet another seasoned operator. Prior to joining DoorDash he was CEO of Elation, a streaming video company that operated Crunchyroll, before it was acquired by AT&T. Prior to that, he spent 10 years at Google, including as a top manager at YouTube and on its AdSense team. Before getting into tech, Pickett was a fighter pilot in the Navy, flying F/A-18 planes. While in the Navy, he graduated from its TOPGUN flight training program. Got a tip about DoorDash? Contact Troy Wolverton via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @troywolv, or send him a secure message through Signal at 415.515.5594. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Read more about DoorDash: DoorDash's head of engineering walks us through how it worked with $12 billion Cloudflare to keep its cloud infrastructure running as it dealt with millions of restaurant orders in the early days of the pandemic San Francisco's District Attorney is suing DoorDash for classifying workers as contractors instead of employees despite AB5 gig-worker law DoorDash, riding on food delivery demand during the coronavirus crisis, looks set to raise hundreds of millions of dollars in new funding at a $15 billion valuation DoorDash, buoyed by surging demand and ample capital, has launched new services like toilet paper deliveries from convenience stores during the COVID crisis. CEO Tony Xu says it's being 'extremely agile.'
Airbnb's upcoming stock-market debut could be a once-in-a-lifetime deal, "Mad Money" host Jim Cramer said on his Monday show. "Thanks to COVID-19, Airbnb is now the safest way to travel, which is why this IPO might end up being the steal of the century," he said. The home-sharing platform will benefit from people's fear of staying in hotels, face less resistance from embattled hotel chains, and attract more users as people rent out their homes for extra cash and travelers look for bargains, Cramer argued. "This turns out to be another one of those forever-changed businesses that's actually benefiting from COVID-19," he added. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Airbnb raised some eyebrows when it filed to go public last week, even as the pandemic continues to discourage global travel and depress demand on the home-sharing platform. However, its stock-market debut could be a rare chance to buy into a world-beater at a discount, "Mad Money" host Jim Cramer said on his Monday show. "Thanks to COVID-19, Airbnb is now the safest way to travel, which is why this IPO might end up being the steal of the century," he said. Read more: UBS analyzed how 900 stocks perform on positive COVID-19 vaccine news days — and concluded that these 17 are poised to jump at least 9% on the next cycle of encouraging headlines Staying in a stranger's house previously felt riskier than booking a hotel. Now, people view hotels as "outright dangerous" in terms of catching the virus, given they have to share facilities such as elevators, pools, gyms, and restaurants with other guests, Cramer said. Airbnb could also face less resistance from hotels than in the past, as they're busy chasing government bailouts and trying to stay in business, Cramer continued. "It pretty much has the market to itself," he said. "The once-mighty hotel and restaurant industries — and their unions — no longer have the clout to keep Airbnb down." The depressed US economy could also help Airbnb, as more people may look to rent their spare rooms and homes for some extra cash, and travelers are hunting for bargains, Cramer said. "This turns out to be another one of those forever-changed businesses that's actually benefiting from COVID-19," he said. Read more: Morgan Stanley breaks down 3 reasons stocks could be headed for a short-term correction as the market gets dragged higher by a few big winners Cramer's comments suggest Airbnb's recent troubles will be temporary. CEO Brian Chesky warned in May that revenues were on track to tumble more than 50% this year, spurring him to cut costs, raise $2 billion in fresh capital, and lay off 1,900 employees or 25% of Airbnb's global workforce. Airbnb's bookings have rebounded since then, but were still down 30% in June compared to the same month last year, Bloomberg reported. Moreover, revenue slumped 67% year-on-year to $335 million last quarter, resulting in a $400 million loss before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization, Bloomberg said.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
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This variety allows you to break up your week and enjoy some socializing.There are plenty of awesome places to bring your work to, and they’re not limited to overcrowded coffee shops either.Consider These 9 Alternatives to Your Typical CafesLibrariesThese are ideal spots for getting serious work done, especially if your job doesn’t involve making phone calls.By signing up as a library member, you get to support your community and enjoy free internet connectivity among other amenities.If public libraries are too rowdy for your tastes, look up privately-owned facilities open to the public or neighborhood reading centers.You’ll have to pay a small fee for the upkeep but it’ll still be less than paying for a coworking space.MallsWhile they’re packed with people, they serve as good locations for working online, as long as you get over the noise and distractions.Bigger chain stores offer free Wi-Fi too, although the speed leaves much to be desired during peak hours.They offer the same benefits as a coffee shop minus the hordes of remote workers at that.Plus you won’t have to go anywhere else to eat.Coworking SpacesThere are numerous pros to joining a coworking space as we’ve covered in this previous article.
Facebook is planning to sue Thailand's government after it demanded the company prevent users from accessing a group that criticized the country's king, CNN reported Monday. Facebook has complied with the request in the meantime, blocking users in Thailand from seeing posts from the group, "Royalist Marketplace," which has around 1 million users, Reuters reported Monday. Pavin Chachavalpongpun, the group's creator and critic of the monarchy who is living in self-imposed exile in Japan, told Business Insider that Facebook's decision to comply "detrimental both to the right to express freely and democracy in this region." In the US, Facebook and CEO Mark Zuckerberg have repeatedly attempted to position the company as a defender of free speech, but overseas it has typically been more deferential to autocratic governments. The Wall Street Journal also reported this week that Zuckerberg lobbied Trump and members of Congress to take action against rival TikTok on the grounds that its rival wasn't committed to free expression. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Facebook is preparing to take unprecedented legal action against the government of Thailand after it demanded the social media giant block access to a group that had criticized the country's king, CNN reported Monday evening. Reuters reported earlier in the day that Facebook had heeded the demand to block users within Thailand from accessing the group after the government threatened to take Facebook to court. "After careful review, Facebook has determined that we are compelled to restrict access to content which the Thai government has deemed to be illegal," a Facebook spokesperson told CNN. The group, "Royalist Marketplace," has one million members and was created by Pavin Chachavalpongpun, an academic and critic of the monarchy who has been living in self-imposed exile in Japan. "By suing the Thai government over its request to block my group, I see it as the right step. Freedom of expression is something that we are all entitled too, particularly in Thailand where such thing is a rare commodity," Chachavalpongpun told Business Insider, while also criticizing Facebook's compliance. "For Facebook to accept the request of the Thai government to block its access in Thailand, Facebook has become a part of obstructing democratisation in my country and promoting the information censorship. Facebook's decision is detrimental both to the right to express freely and democracy in this region," he said. Facebook did not respond to a request for comment on this story. In Thailand, pro-democracy protests have been raging for more than a month, with citizens publicly criticizing the country's king, Rama X — notable because of strict lèse-majesté laws that make it illegal to insult, defame, or threaten any member of the royal family. But a diverse coalition of Thais have been openly defying those laws to question its monarchial system, push for reforms, and condemn Rama X, who has spent large amounts of time in Europe and fled the country for Germany to wait out the coronavirus pandemic. Facebook's decision to block the Royalist Marketplace group comes less than a week after The Wall Street Journal reported that Facebook's top public policy executive in India let politicians from the country's ruling party off the hook for breaking its rules on hate speech out of fear of backlash. But even as Facebook wrestles with how much deference to show to governments overseas, it has repeatedly attempted to position itself as a defender of free speech in the US, where it has refused to take stronger action against misinformation and hate speech spread by politicians on the grounds it would stifle speech. The Wall Street Journal reported Monday that Mark Zuckerberg lobbied President Trump and members of Congress to take action against TikTok, a growing rival to Facebook, because it didn't support American values of free expression. "On TikTok, the Chinese app growing quickly around the world, mentions of protests are censored, even in the U.S. Is that the internet we want?" Zuckerberg said in a speech in October. Facebook and other American tech companies, including Google, Apple, Microsoft, and Airbnb and have frequently run into similar dilemmas around the world in countries with more autocratic systems of government, often siding with governments' demands instead of risking losing access to users there.SEE ALSO: WordPress developer said Apple wouldn't allow updates to the free app until it added in-app purchases — letting Apple collect a 30% cut Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What it takes to be a PGA Tour caddie
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Y Combinator is an incredibly selective startup accelerator — and applications for the winter 2021 batch are due on September 23 by 8 p.m. PDT. An impressive application can help you win a spot. Business Insider has highlighted below some examples of successful applications from Y Combinator alumni. Business Insider regularly interviews founders about their entrepreneurial journeys. You can read about them all by subscribing to BI Prime.  There's still time to apply to Y Combinator. Since the accelerator opened its doors in 2005, more than 2,500 startups have gone through the program. Many of those startups have since achieved tremendous success. Think Airbnb, Dropbox, Instacart, Coinbase, and Brex.  The admissions process at Y Combinator is very selective: About 1.5% of the companies that apply make it in. Once they do, those companies receive seed funding, plus advice from seasoned founders. The program culminates in a Demo Day, when founders get to pitch investors on their business. This summer, the accelerator is holding demo day online on August 24 and 25.  The deadline to participate in Y Combinator's winter 2021 batch is September 23. To convince the admissions committee that you deserve a spot in the program, you'll have to craft an impressive pitch. Business Insider has talked to several founders who have done just that — and we've shared the original applications that got them in. Below, we've listed those applications, which you can use as inspiration when you're writing your own. Goodly: Read the application form that got a company with $0 in the bank into the selective startup accelerator that launched Airbnb and Dropbox InEvent: The startup accelerator that launched Airbnb and Dropbox rejected 3 founders in 2015 — so they rewrote their application and tried again. Read the form that finally won them a spot last year. Simple Habit: Read the application form that got the 'Spotify for meditation' into the selective startup accelerator that launched Airbnb and Dropbox Prolific: Less than 2% of applicants get accepted to Y Combinator, the startup accelerator that launched Airbnb and Dropbox. Read the application that helped 2 scientists who bootstrapped their business get in. Are you a startup founder who's participated in Y Combinator and wants to share your story? Contact Business Insider correspondent Shana Lebowitz at [email protected] ALSO: A former Y Combinator partner says a founder's answer to this one question on the tech accelerator's application strongly predicts their startup success Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's what it's like to travel during the coronavirus outbreak
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