The 2015 listeria outbreak linked to Blue Bell ice cream company hospitalized 10 people and killed three, according to the CDC.
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A top trader on the Binance exchange confidently confirmed that Ethereum will hit a new high early next year.Logan Han - one of the fairly well-known traders on Binance, said ETH is ready to trigger a bull run to turn the overhead resistances into support, paving the way for a long-term bullish move.Han believes that in the next year ETH will have a big bull run, possibly larger than 2017, helping the digital currency soar above $ 2,000 - a nearly 420% increase from its current price of 386.USD.Han is not the only analyst optimistic about the long-term trend of ETH, bitcoin trader JackSparrow agrees.JackSparrow stated that there is a very high chance that ETH price will surpass the peak of $ 1,300 early next year."This year looks pretty boring, but I believe the situation will change next year ... a breakout above $ 1,300 is not impossible."Besides ETH predictions, Logan Han is also eyeing a relatively new DeFi Coin in the market, DFI.money (YFII).He said YFII will be able to climb to $ 9,500 and make a profit of more than 300% by the end of October.See more about Bitcoin transactions: eth to btc“This is not an investment recommendation.In my opinion YFII is about to fly ”YFII ratesRecently, the DeFi market has gone through a period of devastating corrections, when a series of major DeFi Coins have lost more than 50% in value, such as yearn.finance (YFI) has fallen by more than 70% ...Kelvin Koh, chief executive officer of crypto investment firm Spartan Group, said: "The recent massive price drop of the DeFi Coins is a healthy one for the long term sustainability of the DeFi market."“I am very happy that a series of DeFi Coin prices are deeply reduced, the DeFi market needs to undergo corrections like this, though painful, it is a good thing to help investors or DeFi project owners not suffer.
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Nava, a new kind of employee benefits brokerage, announced today that it raised a $20 million round of financing from Thrive Capital, an investment firm that builds and invests in internet, software, and technology-enabled companies.Nava’s unified benefits offering combines modern healthcare tools, year-round employee advocacy, and ongoing measurement to improve employee engagement and drive down costs for small-to-midsized companies.Nava was co-founded by Brandon Weber, Chief Executive Officer, Donald DeSantis, Chief Product Officer, and Kareem Zaki of Thrive Capital, a lead investor in the company.The last decade has produced an explosion in healthcare complexity and with it, rising costs that are being disproportionately absorbed by small-to-midsized organizations.Without the resources available to build out a sophisticated benefits department, these companies have outsourced key benefits decisions to traditional brokers, who have limited resources and expertise to manage their expanding scope and the rapidly evolving landscape of healthcare solutions.Nava equips these organizations with the advocacy, tools, change management, and expertise needed to deliver more valuable benefits outcomes for their employees, while lowering overall plan cost.For its brokers, Nava enables them to focus on what they do best – produce meaningful outcomes for their clients – by supporting them with a best-in-class lead generation, account management, and employee advocacy platform.“In our conversations with hundreds of employers across America, we saw scattered examples where mission-oriented consultants, when armed with the right resources, transformed benefits programs, saving employers 20-40% while at the same time dramatically improving the employee experience.
Photo by Michael Kovac / Getty Images The Verge used to have a fine tradition of cataloging all of the times when Eric Schmidt stuck his foot in his mouth, and today’s feels like a worthy addition: the former Google CEO and executive chairman has decided that social networks are “amplifiers for idiots.” The fuller quote, according to Bloomberg: “The context of social networks serving as amplifiers for idiots and crazy people is not what we intended.” Without knowing who “we” refers to, you might think he’s talking about how the entire tech industry has failed to keep sites like Facebook and Twitter from creating echo chambers and polarizing politics around the world (though some argue we can’t blame social networks alone). He’s certainly a member of the tech elite, one who... Continue reading…
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Summary - A new market study, titled “Global Pigment Dispersion Market (By Dispersion Type: Water-Based and Solvent-Based, By Pigment Type- Organic and Inorganic, By Application- Automotive, Furniture, Construction, Printing and Others and By Regions)– Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2018 – 2025” has been featured on WiseGuyReports.Global Pigment Dispersion Market-Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast, 2018 - 2025Research MethodologySheer Analytics and Insights' all degree research methodology represents the analytical rigor of our research process.It offers a complete view of industry trends, opportunities and challenges by integrating all the major factors.We identify the major drivers and restraints for every region (North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, & Middle East) of any particular market with a weightage value of how it is impacting the market.Here the driver acts as a pull factor and restraint as a push factor.Also Read: https://marketersmedia.com/global-pigment-dispersion-market-2019-industry-analysis-size-share-strategies-and-forecast-to-2025/88929017Primary ResearchKey players in the market are identified through review of secondary sources such as industry whitepapers, annual reports, published reports by credible agencies, financial reports and published interviews of Key Opinion Leaders (KOLs) from leading companies.KOLs include Chief Executive Officer (CEO), general managers, vice presidents, sales directors, market executives, R directors, product managers, procurement managers, export managers etc.During the research process, all the major stakeholders across the value chain are contacted for conducting primary interviews.Additionally, the multi-functional development of pigment dispersion fuels the demand of this market.The competitive profiling of the key players in the global market across five broad geographic regions is included in the study.
The company increased its EBITDA by about 70% from Q4 2018 to Q3 2020 by growing its profits and improving operating expenses.
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We dive deep into Singtel’s attempt at starting digital ventures, as well as corporate innovation in general.
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Hello, my name is Byron Rodgers and I am a service-centered Executive Protection Agent, Video Blogger, Published Author, and Veteran on a steadfast mission to improve the quality of the world by making good people dangerous.Over the span of a decade, I have gained extensive private security experience, conducting private security operations for each available VIP demographic industry-wide in over 60 countries.During my time in the military, I served in the United States Marine Corps infantry with two deployments to Iraq as a Squad Leader for four years.Right afterward, I became an Executive Protection Agent (bodyguard).I was fortunate enough to experience a seamless transition from the military back into civilian life I was once well-acquainted with.Ultimately, this transition inspired me to author the book, “Finding Meaning After the Military, and I’m currently working on book number two: “Social Dynamics of Executive Protection.”Today, I proudly serve as the Chief Executive Officer at Bravo Research group, the Supervisor of Security at Harvest Christian Fellowship, and the one-stop-shop security consultant for many high net worth individuals, their families, and various corporate initiatives.I completed my AA in business management and in addition to holding a Bachelor’s degree in the Science of Psychology from the University of Phoenix, I have also earned a Master’s degree in the art of Psychology with a minor in Forensic Psychology from North Central University.
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Daniel Kirchert, co-founder and CEO of Byton, has left the business and the company's board of directors have approved a restructuring plan.
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Ragini Vecham is a Strategic Digital Marketing Advisor.She applies her insights into ‘BotSprint’ as the Chief Executive Officer.She has implemented effective strategies to boost revenues while decreasing the expenses for an effective bottom line.She effectively conveys the vision for the growth and development of the business.She has gained her skills from her experience from Cisco Systems, CNET, and Hyperion.In addition to all of these, she also serves several non-profit organizations and has founded Internship4Teens.
As India gets back to recovery mode on the back of a resurgence in consumer demand, the currently-on IPL season and a festive season round the corner, Sumanto Chattopadhyay, chairman and chief executive officer at 82.5 Communications shares his work-from-home schedule last few months Indians do not use toilet paper.  At least, most don’t. So, the global pre-lockdown run on loo rolls passed us by. While many of the other, mostly negative, experiences of the pandemic were and continue to be shared by us—often on a bigger, more horrific scale than elsewhere—this is one inconvenience we have been immune to. (If you are from another part of the world and can’t contain your curiosity, we use either a ‘jet spray’ (self-explanatory?) or a ‘lota’—a big plastic mug—instead. (Indian-American comedian Hasan Minhaj devoted an entire episode of his show to the joys of the latter. In case you are the literary type, it was also a minor theme in Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children.) A loosely-related fun fact: Most middle-class Indians didn’t clean their own bathrooms before the pandemic. That was the job of the maid. So once lockdown precluded domestic workers from entering the home, we had to learn to do it ourselves. This, along with the paranoia of the pandemic, led to an explosion in toilet-cleaning and other hygiene products—which kept the advertising industry afloat. Though just barely. From bandying about the term ‘new normal’ without having the faintest clue as to what it meant to adopt a radically new way of working (and living) without batting an eyelid; from scrambling to create the agency’s Covid-19 Commandments—a playbook for sensitive yet relevant communication—to not being able to bear to see one more ad on the pandemic bandwagon, it’s been for me as a creative director, a roller-coaster half-year. And counting. Advertising is locked out Initially, lockdown locked out a bulk of advertising. Creating cheap and cheerless memes—‘moment marketing’—reflecting the Indian prime minister’s latest gesture to calm or distract the populace was one of the few things brands did. Our leader provided fodder: He asked us to clang pots and pans to show appreciation for health workers one day. Another day, he asked everyone to turn on their lights at a particular time to dispel the darkness of Covid (which led to fears of bringing down the country’s power grid). He repurposed concepts like the ‘lakshmanrekha’ (a line you must not cross) from our ancient epics to get not-so-literate people to refrain from stepping out. He chose a cumulative period of 40 days for the first lockdown extension—significant not only because it is the specific number of days of the original quarantine, introduced during the Black Death, but also because this length of time is connected to Hindu tradition. Then, when Covid-19 spiralled out of control, he stopped making these announcements and advertisers had to find other topics to base their low- or no-cost social media communication on. We sank into despair as fees were cut and contracts were terminated. We trod water with those who were not putting out any real work or, at best, getting us to create ‘home-made’ ads. Sometimes, we applied Indian ‘jugaad’ innovation and got real cameramen to shoot with family members as models, giving the ad a professional sheen. We created relevant pro bono communication—to raise awareness about the rise in domestic violence during the lockdown, for example. We created internal communication to keep morale up in the face of an uncertain future. Apart from the globally-shared fears of impending job loss or, worse—the loss of one’s life or that of a loved one—there were the added problems of working from an Indian home: Try doing a client call from the dining table of a tiny apartment with all members of your multi-generational joint family in the same room making their respective noises. Glimmers of hope Then, unaccountably, glimmers of hope: As people wearied of the pandemic and rekindled their appetite for non-Covid-related goods, as e-commerce and online payments, which had been lagging in India, got the fillip they needed with buying from home rising sharply—brands suddenly wanted to advertise again. Clients started asking for ‘proper’ ads once more. First one. Then another. Then yet another. Our response was exhilaration mixed with panic: Hurrah, but how the heck do you shoot when there still are a hundred and one restrictions on travelling, gathering in groups and indeed working in public spaces? Filmmakers quickly found workarounds. With that and the authorities being coaxed to relax a few rules—for the greater good of reviving commerce—we were soon shooting full-fledged tv commercials and online videos.   BC - Before Coronavirus The budgets were lower than what we would have thought possible to work with Before Coronavirus. But they were budgets, nonetheless. We had real work. Hallelujah! We saw a future. Never had one imagined that one would supervise a shoot from home via a video call—a shoot happening in another city, where it was permitted to shoot, when it still wasn’t in yours, but where no one could go because of travel restrictions; a shoot the director was directing from home, from yet another city; with locally-sourced models who removed their face-shields only when the camera was on; with a skeleton crew, as the usual numbers were not permitted to gather. Within a month, we graduated to what is considered by the industry as the most desirable or most complex type of ad shoot, depending on how you look at it: A shoot with a Bollywood star. One with a 100+ crew, in a studio. Everyone had to be tested prior. The makeup man was sanitized before he was allowed to apply makeup. A ‘tunnel’ was built between the star’s vanity van and the set. The director wore a PPE suit. While supervising a shoot via—at times patchy—video calls has its challenges and is not quite the same as being there, there are some plus points too: During a multi-city shoot with multiple crews, the director and I could ‘virtually’ shift location in moments. When shoots for two brands fell on the same day, I could simultaneously supervise both via video calls on two devices. That’s when it hit me: This was the new normal. Something I would have thought, six months ago, to be bizarre—as bizarre as the schizophrenic dressing style it engendered—but now took as a matter of course. Hygiene kept us employed  As I mentioned, it was the hygiene category that kept us employed during the early days of lockdown: New brands were launched. New categories were launched. Hand sanitizers, heretofore a niche product in India, went mainstream. Fruit and vegetable sanitizers were introduced. Hand wash sales zoomed. ‘Spray and pray’ took on a new meaning as surface disinfectant aerosols for everything from doorknobs to kitchen counters to toilet seats became all the rage. As India gradually unlocks, faced with a Morton’s fork between death by starvation and death by Covid-19 - and people are fearfully stepping out - other categories are coming to the fore. ‘Immunity’ is probably the biggest of these. From nutritional supplements for children, to yoghurt, to herbal products derived from ancient Indian Ayurveda, brands with immunity-building credentials are thriving. Sometimes, it’s too much of a stretch though—such as a clothing brand claiming the protective goodness of herbs.  (To wear or to eat, that is the question.) Products find new relevance Products like e-cycles are finding new relevance. An e-cycle allows you to commute more safely than public transport—where, in the Indian context, social distancing is almost impossible. It is much cheaper than a car or a motorcycle, so it appeals to consumers with tightened belts and purse-strings. (It helps you get fit too—thereby boosting your immunity?) And it’s good for the environment, something urban Indians have developed a new appreciation for—after breathing clean air for the first time in decades, with factories shut and polluting vehicles off the road. Meanwhile, I’m still largely confined to my home, with Mumbai seeing all-time-high infection rates and, therefore, our physical office indefinitely closed. Nevertheless, I feel I can breathe again. Not just because of the cleaner air. But because the wheels of my industry—indeed that of the industry as a whole—are turning again. The Indian Premier League, festival season and optimism The Indian Premier League, the advertising ‘super bowl’ of India, has just been revived. Though postponed from its normal March to May season and relocated to the UAE, it’s happening. Our stadiums remain shut, but what matters is that the biggest event of Indian television is on. Along with the advertising that’s a part of it. The quality of cricket as well as the ads—hastily put together—are not what one is used to. But the consumer economy is winning. India’s main festival season, comprising Navaratri, Durga Puja and Diwali, is around the corner. During this turbo-charged Indian triple-Christmas, not just shopping but expenditure on things like house-painting reach an annual crescendo. Many are seeing it as the inflection point, we need to catapult us out of the economic crisis.  In fact, e-commerce giants are betting on a Diwali season happier than that of the old normal. Their brick and mortar counterparts are ‘cautiously optimistic’ too. This is as much because of hard-nosed projections of consumer spends and pent-up demand as about deep-rooted faith in the positive power of these religious events. Never mind that Covid-19 cases in the country are in the millions. I won’t specify how many million, because the up-to-date number at the time of writing would be grossly out-of-date no sooner is it written. Suffice to say that we are hurtling towards the status of the most afflicted nation on earth. But Indians have another incurable disease: Optimism. While hospitals over-flow and cremation grounds see day-long queues, malls have opened. People’s offices may be shut or shut down, but they’re out shopping. Deadly irony or economic lifeline?  For me, all said and done, ad shoots really are the green shoots of hope. Looking ahead through the rosé-tinted lens of a creative director, I see that it just might be a happy Diwali. And a prosperous 2021. Sumanto Chattopadhyay is the chairman and chief executive officer at 82.5 Communications, part of the Ogilvy Group.
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Chris Kenna advises companies to create their products and campaigns with diverse consumers in mind from the start, not as an afterthought. The post Diversity ‘is a commercial imperative now’: Brand Advance CEO Chris Kenna appeared first on Digiday.
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YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki cited QAnon's grassroots nature as a complicating factor in banning it from the platform.
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As an engineer, I try to be pragmatic: You don't need the latest tech toy, but quality tools you really like will keep you dialed in.
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