Amazon has a month to respond to the accusation.Amazon has a history of violating the Hazardous Materials Regulations, the FAA said in a release, explaining that between February 2013 and September 2015 the e-commerce giant was found to have breached regulations 24 other times.Commenting in relation to the FAA s proposed fine, Amazon told Reuters it ships tens of millions of products every day and have developed sophisticated technologies to detect potential shipping hazards and use any defects as an opportunity for continuous improvement, adding, We will continue to partner with the FAA in this area.For example, a UPS Boeing 747 aircraft leaving Dubai was brought down soon after take off by a lithium-battery fire that started in its cargo hold.The FAA s proposed fine comes as Amazon works to build its own end-to-end delivery network, enabling it to rely less heavily on services operated by the likes of UPS and FedEx as it seeks to boost reliability and cut costs.Its plan includes a recent deal with the Air Transport Services Group to use 20 Boeing 767 cargo planes for moving packages big and small across the U.S. Another part of the plan includes the use of its own drones for so-called last mile delivery to customers homes, a venture that depends to a great extent on regulations laid down by none other than the FAA.
The Amazon logo on packaging from the companyAmazon faces a $350,000 fine from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration after shipping a corrosive chemical by air, in violation of federal law -- the 25th time the company has been found to violate hazardous chemical shipping regulations in two and a half years.The latest case concerns a one-gallon container of "Amazing Liquid Fire," a corrosive drain cleaner that was sent by air from Louisville, Kentucky, to Boulder, Colorado, on October 15, 2014.They reported a burning sensation on their skin and had to be treated with a chemical wash.It also said Amazon didn't provide emergency response information with the package and had not provided hazardous material training to employees who handled the package."Amazon has a history of violating the Hazardous Materials Regulations," the FAA said in a statement.In the period from February 2013 to September 2015, Amazon was found to have violated hazardous shipment rules 24 other times.
REUTERS/Mike Segar/File PhotoWASHINGTON Reuters - The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said on Monday it is proposing a $350,000 civil fine against Amazon.com Inc for shipping a product that allegedly violated hazardous materials regulations and injured several UPS workers who handled the package.The penalty is largest fine the FAA has proposed imposing on Amazon, which the agency said has had a series of hazardous materials violations.LIQUID FIRE," a corrosive drain cleaner for transportation by air from Louisville, Kentucky, to Boulder, Colorado.The FAA said that from February 2013 to September 2015, the government found Amazon had violated the hazardous materials regulations 24 other times.Amazon did not immediately respond to a request for comment.In April 2014, Amazon paid a $91,000 fine to the FAA after its employees improperly shipped a package in 2013 containing flammable liquid adhesive by air on Federal Express from Whitestown, Ind., to Boulder, Colo.FedEx employees in Boulder discovered a gallon container of the adhesive was leaking and not properly labeled and without proper shipping papers, the FAA said.
Image: Hadrian / Shutterstock.comThe Federal Aviation Administration is fining Amazon $350,000 for not realizing it should take more precaution when shipping a product called Amazing!According to the FAA, Amazon shipped a gallon of the liquid fire —in reality, a corrosive drain cleaner—from Kentucky to Colorado in 2014.The company might have gotten away with violating the hazardous materials requirement, except the container, which wasn t properly packaged or labeled, leaked and the nine UPS employees who touched it had to be treated with a chemical wash.Amazon, for its part, says that it strives for continuous improvement and will continue to partner with the FAA, not that it really has a choice in the matter.It claims that Amazon has a history of shipping dangerous chemicals and has violated the hazardous materials rules 24 times in the past two years.In one case, Amazon paid $91,000 to apologize for sending flammable liquid adhesive.This should be a last resort option, once you start pouring, you can t take it back.
Image caption Amazon has repeatedly been accused of breaching regulationsOnline retailer Amazon is facing a $350,000 £247,000 fine for allegedly shipping hazardous chemicals that injured delivery workers.The US Federal Aviation Administration FAA proposed the fine, accusing the firm of breaching rules by sending a corrosive drain cleaner by air.From February 2013 to September 2015 alone, Amazon was found to have violated the Hazardous Materials Regulations 24 times.FinesIt was not clear how many times Amazon had paid fines or admitted responsibility because the FAA does not announce fines of less than $50,000, a spokesman for the authority told Reuters.FedEx employees in Boulder discovered a gallon container of adhesive was leaking, not properly labelled and without proper shipping papers, the FAA said.According to Reuters, Amazon declined to answer questions about the incident or previous fines but said: "We ship tens of millions of products every day and have developed sophisticated technologies to detect potential shipping hazards and use any defects as an opportunity for continuous improvement.
Amazon could be hit with a $350,000 fine from the FAA for allegedly shipping a package that contained the corrosive drain cleaner Amazing!The package is said to have been shipped in violation of regulations against hazardous materials, and it reportedly resulted in multiple UPS workers sustaining minor injuries; they had to be treated with a chemical wash after touching the leaking package, which caused a burning sensation.This is not the first accusation against Amazon over the shipment of hazardous goods allegedly without proper steps — however, this is the largest fine the FAA has proposed against the company.Between February 2013 and September 2015, the FAA says Amazon had violated 24 hazardous materials regulations.Whether Amazon was fined for those instances is unclear — only large fines are made public by the FAA.Amazon has had to pay some publicly disclosed fines in the past, however, such as $91,000 in April 2014.
Just over a week after the Federal Aviation Administration FAA proposed a $350,000 fine for Amazon after accusing it of inadequately packaging dangerous goods, the agency is suggesting two further penalties worth a total of $130,000 for similar actions that allegedly violated strict rules on how such items are handled.A couple of weeks back, the FAA proposed a $350,000 fine for an alleged incident where the partial contents of a one-gallon container of corrosive drain cleaner leaked on its way from Kentucky to Colorado, with nine UPS employees claiming to have felt a burning sensation after touching it.The FAA accuses Amazon of failing to properly package the consignment, and says it wasn t sent with a proper declaration notifying handlers that it contained hazardous materials.Amazon has a history of violating the Hazardous Materials Regulations, the FAA said in a release, explaining that between February 2013 and September 2015 the company breached rules 24 times.There have been a number of serious incidents in recent years, including in 2010 when a UPS cargo plane leaving Dubai crashed soon after take off, killing both pilots.And we mustn t forget its Prime Air drone, though that ambitious plan is yet to get off the ground.
Credit: Martyn WilliamsThe U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has proposed fining Amazon $130,000 over two incidents in 2014 when it shipped or attempted to ship hazardous goods by air.The flight safety regulator says Amazon shipped the packages without warning labels, paperwork that specified the chemicals inside, or emergency response information.The proposed penalty comes two weeks after the FAA fined Amazon $350,000 over a similar incident that caused injuries to several UPS workers.The first of the two latest fines relates to a shipment made in May 2014, when Amazon sent two packages containing a rust-stain removing product from Illinois to Florida.The shipments were discovered by FedEx workers when they began to leak.Amazon has 30 days to respond to the allegations.
Boxes move along a conveyor belt at an Amazon.com Inc. fulfillment center.The Federal Aviation Administration said it would fine Amazon.com Inc. AMZN -0.73 % $130,000 for allegedly mishandling shipments of dangerous chemicals, marking three fines in less than two weeks the agency has penalized the retailer for violating rules related to shipping hazardous materials by air.Workers at a FedEx Corp. FDX -4.54 % sorting facility in Lake Wales, Fla., discovered that the product, called Rid O Rust Stain Preventer Acid, had leaked through one of the cardboard boxes.The next month, Amazon sent a box containing a 19-ounce container of Simple Air EZ Green,a flammable gas used to clean heating and air conditioning systems, by air from Whitestown, Ind., to Glendale, Calif., the FAA said.The agency proposed a fine of $78,000 for the May, 2014 incident and $52,000 for the later incident.The fine comes after the FAA levied a $350,000 fine on Amazon earlier this month for a similar alleged violation that also occurred in 2014.
On the heels of a recent proposed $350,000 fine against Amazon over the alleged improper shipment of hazardous materials comes another two notices from the FAA: a proposed fine of $78,000 and a proposed fine of $52,000, both likewise over the claimed violations of hazardous materials shipment regulations.The two packages are said to have held a combined total of six 1-gallon plastic jugs of the substance.The FAA claims Amazon gave these two boxes to FedEx for air shipment from Illinois to Florida, and that the contents were discovered when one of the containers began to leak through the cardboard box.Amazon is proposing a $78,000 fine in this instance.In both instances, the FAA says the packages did not adhere to the proper shipping requirements, including things like labels and proper shipping papers.As of yesterday, Amazon has been given 30 days to respond to the allegations.
Amazon has been fined £65,000 by the UK's air regulator for transporting batteries on a passenger aeroplane.After a nine day trial, which ended on September 20, the retailer was found guilty of causing dangerous goods to be delivered by air after a prosecution by the Civil Aviation Authority.The CAA launched the prosecution after officials found banned items in the cargo before it was due to be placed in the hold of a passenger plane.Across four different offences, from January 2014 to June 2015, the flights out of the UK were carrying lithium ion batteries and flammable aerosols.Legal proceedings started after Royal Mail staff scanned the cargo and detected the items."The safety of aviation and the public is paramount and that's why there are important international and domestic restrictions to prohibit the shipping of certain goods that pose a flight safety risk," the CAA's general counsel Kate Staples said in a statement.
Amazon has been testing drones for use in deliveriesOnline shopping giant Amazon has been fined £65,000 after being found guilty of attempting to ship dangerous goods by air.The retailer was convicted at Southwark Crown Court earlier this week of four counts of causing dangerous goods to be delivered for carriage in an aircraft, a breach of air safety regulations.The items included lithium ion batteries and flammable aerosols, which were destined for flights within and outside the UK in four shipments between January 2014 and June 2015.They were only discovered when the cargoes were screened by Royal Mail ahead of their intended departures and seized before they could reach the aircraft.Amazon said the safety breach was "neither wilful nor reckless"
Amazon has been fined £65,000 after being found guilty of attempting to ship dangerous goods by air.The online giant tried to transport lithium-ion batteries and flammable aerosols between 2014 and 2015.It was found guilty at Southwark Crown Court of causing dangerous goods to be delivered for carriage in an aircraft in breach of air navigation rules.An Amazon spokesman said: "The safety of the public, our customers, employees and partners is an absolute priority."The items were destined for flights in and outside the UK in four shipments between January 2014 and June 2015.They were only discovered when the cargoes were screened by Royal Mail before departure, and seized before they could reach the aircraft.
Amazon has been found guilty of shipping dangerous goods by air, and now has to cough up serious cash in penance.A UK court has ordered Amazon to pay £65,000 in fines after the online retailer tried to transport flammable aerosols and lithium-ion batteries, the BBC reports.According to the BBC, Amazon attempted the shipments between January 2014 and June 2015, but was caught out after the Royal Mail screened the cargo before they could make it to the airplane.The goods were seized, sparking a court case helmed by the UK s Civil Aviation Authority CAA .There are important international and domestic restrictions to prohibit the shipping of certain goods that pose a flight safety risk, Kate Staples, General Counsel for the CAA, is quoted as saying.These dangerous goods include lithium batteries, which are banned from being transported as mail or cargo on a passenger aircraft unless they are installed in or packed with equipment.
Even for the well-tuned delivery machine that is Amazon, mishaps can happen.Unfortunately for the company s U.K. arm, it was found guilty of breaking aviation laws, reports The Guardian.The Civil Aviation Authority CAA had its case against Amazon U.K. brought before a judge in a London court after the agency received a complaint from Royal Mail.According to the postal service service, it stopped three packages from entering the system after it deemed the packages dangerous, with a fourth packaged stopped by UPS.Royal Mail alerted Amazon of the dangerous packages back in 2013, but the company continued to ship out packages containing dangerous goods, specifically aerosols and lithium batteries.To make things worse, the company was told of 782 packages between November 2013 and May 2015 that contained these dangerous goods, and that should not be airmailed.
Amazon UK Services Ltd has been fined £65,000 for attempting to ship dangerous goods on passenger planes, including lithium-ion batteries and aerosols.The retailer was found during sentencing at Southwark Crown Court last week to have breached four UK civil aviation rules for the offence of "causing dangerous goods to be delivered for carriage in an aircraft."The offending items included spare batteries for mobile phones or tablets, as well as a can of Dove deodorant and a hair mousse made by Tresemme, which were sent on a mixture of domestic and international flights, according to the Press Association.Each item was intercepted by staff working for Royal Mail or UPS during routine screening between January 2014 and June 2015, before they could be transported."Under the right circumstances the batteries, even new, undamaged batteries, could overheat, potentially causing burns, explosion or a fire," the prosecutor Martin Goudie told the court, PA reported.The Civil Aviation Authority's general counsel Kate Staples warned that the UK took a hard line on shipping goods of this nature on passenger aircraft.
According to the Federal Aviation Administration, in August 2015 FedEx Corp. FDX -0.31 % workers at a sorting facility in Cary, Ill., discovered a leaking package that held two 14-ounce bottles of a flammable, ethanol-based hair tonic.The shipment, which was flown from Ruskin, Fla., to Algonquin, Ill., wasn t packaged or marked properly to show it contained hazardous material, the FAA alleges, and shipping papers didn t provide required details, including emergency response information.The agency proposed a $78,000 civil penalty against Amazon for the incident, adding to three other fines of $350,000, $78,000 and $52,000 that regulators proposed in June for similar violations.Regulators in the U.K. have also charged Amazon this year with similar violations, including an attempt to ship lithium–ion batteries on passenger aircraft that are barred from carrying the batteries.A spokeswoman for Amazon said in a statement that the online retailer has developed sophisticated technologies to detect potential shipping hazards and use any defects as an opportunity for continuous improvement, adding, We will continue to partner with the FAA in this area.The enforcement actions come as Amazon is adding logistics services and building operations, including a leased fleet of cargo airplanes, so that it can handle its goods in its own network.
If lithium batteries go boom in the hold, you're all screwedEurope's aviation regulator has warned that electronic devices should not be stowed in an aircraft's cargo hold, advice that contradicts the recent ban on laptops and tablets in cabin baggage on certain flights by UK authorities.The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) issued a reminder to airlines that devices containing lithium batteries can pose a fire hazard and should be considered dangerous goods.It said they "should preferably be carried in the passenger cabin.This would enable the crew to react quickly in case an incident involving such [portable electronic devices] occurs."Last month the UK government banned laptops and tablets from cabin baggage on direct flights from Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Tunisia and Saudi Arabia.
p An American company implausibly named AnalTech – no, really – has been slammed hard enough for a hazardous materials response team to be called out to deal with the smell.A pick-up truck ploughed through the wall of AnalTech, which insists it is an analytical technology firm, early on Tuesday morning, as reported by Delaware TV news station WDEL.The truck crashed into an external wall, knocking a hole through it into the laboratory inside."Officials entering the building detected an odour," the station said, "and a representative explained the smell was coming from a lab."Alarmed officials called in hazardous materials (hazmat) teams.They gave the all-clear after "about three hours", though investigations are said to be ongoing.
In the spring, a government decision on the SOS Alarm will have new opportunities to warn people in a certain area to disasters or public danger.Accurate information, quickly, is extremely important if something serious happens in our society.People who are in the affected area must know what to do if a truck with dangerous goods, running of the road or if there is a fire in an industrial building.the Method used is based on to find out what people who find themselves in an area.And everything is based on information from the country's telecom operators and the technology, something called c lokationsbaserade text, from the original location based.Usually, the mobile phone's identity in the form of an IMSI (a series of numbers that identifies an ability of mobile phone subscribers, the red note), says Anders Forsell, project manager at SOS Alarm and one of those who have been involved in producing the system draws in the time in the weekend.
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