the European commission would like to see the cash movement of the European union a more comprehensive control.the state council issued on Thursday submitted to parliament the commission's December proposal to the union entering or leaving the cash control regulation.the Commission also proposed to the existing regulation be repealed.the Aim is to prevent more effectively the money laundering and terrorist financing.the Current setting, over 10 000 euros in cash must notify the local customs authority.the competent authorities have the right to make amendments.
European commission president Jean-Claude Juncker towards brexit was so, that it should be a ”new beginning” of the European integration.the”Brexit is not the end of everything.We need to keep it as a new beginning, which is stronger and which is better,” Juncker said.Juncker threw also the Financial Times, according to the peak of the Us presidential Donald Trump in the direction of the fact that this is advocating brexit.”the Newly elected U.s. president was glad that brexit is happening, and has asked other countries to do the same.And if he continues at the same rate, I will I take to promote Ohio, Austin and Texas independence.”
Report authors call on gov.UK, business to up their spendLeaving the EU could mean UK universities lose a whopping £1bn research funding, according to report released by Digital Science today.Their data showed the UK was the fifth-largest producer of science and technical articles behind USA, China, Japan and Germany, despite receiving just 1.63 per cent from public and private sectors in research.Figures from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development reveal that investment from UK companies contribute only 1.06 per cent of GDP toward research and development.This is below the average of many European countries and is almost 80 per cent lower than the R investment made by German businesses.Should the UK vote to leave next month, the report stresses that significant political efforts will need to be made to plug the funding gap and avoid long-term damage to the research and education sector .Ridley said that some of the biggest scientific organisations including The European Space Agency, The European Molecular Biology Organisation and CERN, were not EU-membership exclusive and was unfair if the EU parliament held the power to decide how money was spent.
Colourbox Finland avoided the expected slippage of the Eurogroup deficit procedure, even if the debt ratio has climbed more than 60 percent of the Stability and Growth Pact limit set by the GDP. The European Commission estimates on Wednesday, the sustainability criteria are met countries. And lists the familiar demands to dismantle labor market rigidities, in order to increase local bargaining and the conclusion of the administrative reform, which means, inter alia, social and health care reform. The Commission came to Finland in March shepherd letter in which it reported noticing risks to Finland's public finances. For now, the Commission took into account both the Finnish economic situation that the reception of refugees. cleaned cyclically based Finnish public debt is 57-58 per cent of GDP.
View photosMoreThe Netflix logo is shown in this illustration photograph in Encinitas, California October 14, 2014.REUTERS/Mike Blake/File PhotoBRUSSELS Reuters - Online video streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime will be required to devote at least a fifth of their catalogs to European content under proposals set to be announced next week.On-demand services will have to ensure they have at least a 20 percent share of European works in their catalog and ensure their "prominence", according to a draft of the proposed Audiovisual Media Services Directive seen by Reuters.The Commission wants to avoid forum-shopping whereby companies set up in countries with light financial obligations, such as Luxembourg and the Netherlands.Subscription services like Netflix and Amazon should consider only one thing when placing content on their platforms: what their viewers want to watch."The new proposal will also make video-sharing platforms such as YouTube impose stricter age barriers for minors to protect them from harmful content.
Teenager Amina Ali was found on Tuesday near the Sambisa forest near the border with Cameroon.4.Ivanka Trump defended her father, US presidential candidate Donald Trump, on Wednesday against a New York Times story that detailed extensive allegations of workplace sexism.A US patrol plane on a regular mission was intercepted by two Chinese military aircraft over the South China Sea on Wednesday.The hacker known as Peace  says the credentials were obtained during a 2012 LinkedIn data breach in which 6.5 million encrypted passwords were posted online, according to Motherboard.8.A new report found no evidence that genetically modified crops are less safe to eat or worse for the environment than regular crops, despite concerns that GMOs could have an effect on everything from allergies to cancer.It's a significant improvement from last year, when it claimed only "hundreds of millions" to Facebook's 1 billion app installs.And finally ...Here's what fruits and vegetables looked like before we domesticated them.NOW WATCH: THE STORY OF GOLDMAN SACHS: From foot peddlers to a powerhouseLoading video...
European regulators plan to force American video streaming companies like Netflix and Amazon to show more European TV shows and movies, The Financial Times reports.The paper has seen a draft of a European Commission proposal which is set to be announced next week.It will subject on-demand video platforms to the same rules at broadcasters — requiring them to ensure that 20% of the content they offer is European in origin, as national broadcast services already do.Netflix and Amazon did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment — though the former has expressed concerns.In a response to the proposals also seen by The Financial Times, it warned: "Rigid numerical quotas risk suffocating the market for on-demand audiovisual media services ... An obligation to carry content to meet a numerical quota may cause new players to struggle to achieve a sustainable business model."It added: "The focus of European audiovisual media policy should be on incentivising the production of European content and not imposing quotas on broadcasters or other … providers who would struggle to meet the supply."Disclosure: Jeff Bezos is an investor in Business Insider through his personal investment company Bezos Expeditions.SEE ALSO: Apple sent engineers to a customer's house after iTunes deleted a load of his musicNOW WATCH: A SpaceX rocket just did something not even its engineers thought was possibleLoading video...
The European Union, locked in a tax battle with the likes of Apple Inc. and McDonald s Corp., laid down the law in its bid to rein in governments that woo multinationals with special fiscal deals allowing them to reduce their fiscal liability by booking profits abroad.The European Commission, which can ban unfair tax advantages conferred to companies, outlined measures cutting member states ability to make rulings that lower the tax burden of foreign businesses.Thursday s publication, which sets out how the regulator will police state aid, sends a warning shot to corporations shifting profits, insisting that such transactions between subsidiaries should be based on market prices.Any deviation from the best estimate of a market-based outcome must be limited and proportionate, the document states.This applies to situations where there aren t any good comparable transactions in the real world given that profit-shifting can involve remunerating hard-to-quantify intellectual property rights held in a low-taxation country.The EU already showed its resolve last year when it ordered Starbucks Corp. to pay as much as 30 million euros $33 million in back taxes.The commission said a Dutch unit paid millions of euros to a U.K.-based arm of the company that isn t taxed in Britain in exchange for a technique to roast coffee beans.Exaggerated tax-deductible royalty payments for this technique allowed Seattle-based Starbucks to unfairly lower its Dutch taxes, it said.The new rules beef up the regulator s powers to limit the type of deals it s probing in Ireland concerning Apple and Luxembourg s arrangements with companies such as Amazon.com Inc. and McDonald s.The iPhone maker s tax agreements with Ireland were criticized as unfair by EU regulators who said the deals were improperly designed to give Apple a financial boost in exchange for jobs in the country.The methods used to determine profit allocation to two Irish units result from a negotiation rather than a pricing methodology, the EU regulator said at the time.All the companies and countries targeted by the EU have denied they broke any rules, raising the prospect of protracted legal challenges.Multinationals should stick with the guidance provided by the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development on the arm s length principle in order to determine how to allocate profits, according to the EU rules.The OECD s guidelines on the matter capture the international consensus on a principle which is meant to ensure that, for tax purposes, transactions between subsidiaries are based on prices an unrelated company would pay, according to the rules.The OECD says such profit shifting costs the world as much as $240 billion a year in lost revenue.
In early 2010, Google confirmed that it had received EC complaints from Microsoft-owned Ciao and French legal search engine eJustice.fr—both of which expressed grave concerns about the terms and conditions imposed on Google s advertising syndication partners.At that point, the EC's antitrust boss outlined four different areas of concern.And it's that monopolistic behaviour that sits at the very heart of Google's status as the gatekeeper of the Internet, even as it continues to insist that "competition is just a click away."Others wondered if relationships between it and Google had simply thawed thanks to the arrival of two new chiefs at the companies.So where does Microsoft's exit—complete with the muffling of the funfair trumpet—leave the remaining complainants in the EC antitrust case?However, observers have argued that StreeMap's case was too limited in scope because it failed to address Google's alleged anti-competitive practices of demoting its rivals in the search market.
Google boss Sundar Pichai speaking on WednesdayGoogle has accused France of attempting to regulate the worldwide internet by demanding that the search giant remove links in search results in every country.The right to be forgotten has seen hundreds of thousands of web pages about individuals pasts removed from Google s search results in the EU, but the CNIL said in March it should apply to web browsers outside of the union, and ordered Google to pay a €100,000 £75,000 fine.For hundreds of years, it has been an accepted rule of law that one country should not have the right to impose its rules on the citizens of other countries.The CNIL's latest order, however, requires us to go even further, applying its interpretation of French law to every version of Google Search globally.If French law applies globally, how long will it be until other countries - perhaps less open and democratic - start demanding that their laws regulating information likewise have global reach?This order could lead to a global race to the bottom, harming access to information that is perfectly lawful to view in one s own country.
A photo has emerged of Uber's self-driving car.The taxi-hailing company plans to test the car on the streets of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.3.The EU wants to force Netflix and Amazon to show more European television.A global venture capital firm called e.ventures has raised a new $150 million £102 million fund.Microsoft is building a "concierge" bot that acts like your personal assistant.Google is battling a demand from a French regulator to remove certain search results globally.
View photosMoreThe Netflix logo is shown in this illustration photograph in Encinitas, California October 14, 2014.REUTERS/Mike Blake/File Photo This May 19 story removes incorrect reference to Netflix being subject to French 60 percent quota in paragraph 13 BRUSSELS Reuters - Online video streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime will be required to devote at least a fifth of their catalogs to European content under proposals set to be announced next week.On-demand services will have to ensure they have at least a 20 percent share of European works in their catalog and ensure their "prominence", according to a draft of the proposed Audiovisual Media Services Directive seen by Reuters.The Commission wants to avoid forum-shopping whereby companies set up in countries with light financial obligations, such as Luxembourg and the Netherlands.Subscription services like Netflix and Amazon should consider only one thing when placing content on their platforms: what their viewers want to watch."The new proposal will also make video-sharing platforms such as YouTube impose stricter age barriers for minors to protect them from harmful content.
European officials sitting on the Article 31 committee, which contains representatives from member states and is chaired by a European Commission official, reportedly concluded they need more time to consider the agreement, otherwise known now as the Privacy Shield.The WP29 said the proposed Privacy Shield was inadequate in a number of key areas, and that exceptions to allow the US to carry out mass surveillance of EU citizens were not acceptable.And now after that watchdog rejection, the proposed deal has been hit with another setback after the Article 31 committee concluded that more time was needed to consider the implications of the proposal.It is understood that the Article 31 group is seeking to incorporate a number of recommendations by the data protection authorities WP29 into the proposed agreement.Ongoing UncertaintyThe proposed transatlantic Privacy Shield was finally agreed in early February to replace the previous Safe Harbour legislation.The proposed replacement is designed to help firms on both sides of the Atlantic to move the personal data of European citizens to the United States without breaking strict EU data transfer rules.
The U.K., Sweden and 12 other European Union nations are urging caution on any new rules on Internet services, lining up against earlier French and German calls for curbs on the growing power of Google and other online companies.Regulators "should refrain from one-size-fits-all regulation" for so-called online platforms and consider alternatives before adding new burdensome laws, the European governments said in the letter addressed to the Netherlands, which currently holds the EU presidency and leads any legislative negotiations.Seeking tougher scrutiny of search engines, social media and app stores, the European Commission is expected to say this week that online platforms may no longer avoid rules that govern other industries such as telecommunications and broadcasting.The EU wants to stoke the region s online economy with proposals it will publish on May 25.France and Germany previously called on EU officials to target Alphabet Inc. s Google, Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc. and Apple Inc. for extra regulation.Google s search, phone and advertising businesses are being investigated by the EU s antitrust arm, which is also looking at tax deals offered to Apple and Amazon.Germany is probing Facebook over its privacy terms.The letter was also signed by Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Poland and Slovenia.
In addition to the EU is expected to hit with record fines shortly is also under a legal battle in France about the right to be forgotten. And that is where the media and taxes. A few months ago denounced the French Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertés out a fine of a much more modest amount, EUR 112 000, more than a million. Now, stated the European Commission consider introducing a special tax for the players, like Google, that aggregate content from others. An indication of Google's power over mediendustrin, while Google defends itself by giving newspapers 10 billion page views each month. The EU Commission is currently examining a tax agreement with the United Kingdom since the amount of 130 million pounds, or 1.5 billion, suspected to be too low.
Last week came reports that the European Commission intends to request 28 billion in fines by Google that it believes that the company violates competition law. A few months ago denounced the French Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertés out a fine of a much more modest amount, EUR 112 000, more than a million. Now, stated the European Commission consider introducing a special tax for the players, like Google, that aggregate content from others. Finally, it is also about tax schemes. Like their counterparts among US IT giants Google is good at finding ways to keep the treasure. The EU Commission is currently examining a tax agreement with the United Kingdom since the amount of 130 million pounds, or 1.5 billion, suspected to be too low.
View photosMoreAn illustration picture shows a projection of binary code on a man holding a laptop computer, in an office in Warsaw June 24, 2013.In a letter to the European Commission and the Netherlands - which holds the rotating EU presidency - ministers from countries including Poland, Britain, Sweden and Finland urged Brussels to make sure regulation is not a barrier to the development of data-driven technologies and to avoid one-size-fits-all rules for online platforms such as Amazon and Facebook.The Commission last year unveiled its Digital Single Market strategy, a wide-ranging plan to knock down barriers in the online world to give Europe a better chance of competing with mainly U.S. tech giants.On Wednesday, it will present the results of its inquiry into online platforms and where it thinks action may be needed.The strategy has faced accusations of protectionism - which the Commission says are unfounded - and data flows to the United States have endured a particularly tough ride since revelations of mass U.S. government snooping programs."It's extremely important to allow free data flows across the EU and we know that in some member states there are ideas to localize data inside of those beautiful countries.
"When you're dealing with fundamental human rights, it's probably worth taking a bit of time to make sure you've got the right protections in place," says Tamzin Evershed, Legal Director at Veritas, who insists that the global data processing arena is a new and complex place."Safe Harbour was created in a different era – pre-9/11, pre-cloud and pre-Snowden – and wasn't intended for the massive volumes of cross-border data traffic we see today," says Willy Leichter, global director of CipherCloud."In terms of their legal and regulatory obligations, these companies should host EU citizens' data exclusively within the EU borders and suspend transfer of data to the US," says James Henry, UK Southern Region Manager, Auriga Consulting."In France, US companies will have to consider 'blocking statutes', and in Switzerland the Swiss Blocking Statute and Bank Secrecy laws, before transferring data out of the country," adds Duthie.The UK's Data Protection Act and Italy's Data Protection Code also make data transfers difficult.The Palais de la Cour de Justice, Luxembourg, is where the GDPR will be judged Image Credit: Wikimedia Crimes and punishments"The German Data Protection Authority has already taken legal action against three companies still relying on Safe Harbour, and we expect more to follow," says Nicky Stewart, Commercial Director at Skyscape Cloud Services, who points out that Google, Facebook and Fitbit are all still relying on Safe Harbour regulations.
Executives at O2 are considering the operator's next move after a planned £10.25bn buy-out was rejected by the European Commission, with a stock market float possibly emerging as the preferred option.The deal, which would have seen Three owner Hutchinson Whampoa buying the network, was blocked by Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, who decided that UK mobile customers would have less choice and pay higher prices as a result of the take-over.City A.M. and the Irish Independent have both cited sources saying that a stock market floatation is being "strongly" considered.However, O2 is also receiving offers from private equity firms, including KKR, TPG, Bain Capital, Apollo, CVC Capital Partners and Apax Partners, according to the Telegraph.He said that a buy by Liberty Global, the owner of Virgin Mobile, was also a possibility, especially considering that Liberty Global bought Belgian operator in Base in 2015."For the time being, Telefonica, under its new chief José María Alvarez-Pallete, may elect to hold on to an asset that in recent years has impressively outperformed rivals despite its uncertain future," said CCS Insight's Mann.
Amid resistance from European lawmakers, Uber Technologies Inc. founder Travis Kalanick called on local regulators to promote the financial incentives car owners could benefit from if they were to pick up a neighbor and share their ride to work."More people would carpool, we d have less congestion, the air would be less polluted, we d all live in a better place."In China, Uber is seeking to catch up to local rival Didi Chuxing, which has launched in hundreds of cities and this month got $1 billion in backing from Apple Inc."China s an expensive place and it takes a lot of funds," Kalanick told reporters after the conference about Apple s investment."Uber s profits can help fund its expansion into new markets and products, Kalanick said.When asked whether the company needs to go back to investors to raise more money, Kalanick said We ll keep you posted on that.Its UberPop business, which lets unlicensed drivers use their own car to pick up riders for a cheaper fee, was banned this month in Sweden after facing a similar fate in France and the Netherlands earlier.Meanwhile local rivals including Spain s Cabify, backed by Rakuten Inc., and France s Chauffeur-Prive, backed by La Banque Postale s XAnge, are adding to existing pressure by taxis and other local players.
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