Aircraft warned not to fly over the western United States. The US luftfarstmyndigheten FAA warns that the GPS system may stop working during the month of June in the skies over California and neighboring states. The tests should be done for six days spread out in June with the center of the Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake. But the GPS system can be affected in an area which extends up to about 1000 km from the military establishment and to heights between 15 meters and 12 000 meters. It allows GPS navigation can be used close to the ground during the tests, writes AVweb. The disturbances can affect all types of aircraft, but the FAA warns especially those flying Embraer Phenom 300 whose instrument flight stability may stop functioning.
Aircraft warned to fly over the western united states.The american luftfarstmyndigheten the FAA warns that the gps system might stop working during the month of June in the skies over California and neighboring states.the Tests should be done during six days spread out during June, with the centre of the Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake.But the gps system can be affected in an area which extends up to about 1 000 km from the silver used and to heights between 15 metres and 12 000 meters.It makes the gps navigation can be used close to the ground during the tests, the write AVweb.the Disorders can affect all types of aircraft but the FAA warns especially those flying the Embraer aircraft Phenom 300 the instruments for flygstabilitet may stop working.
Cars always seem to go belly up in the worst places, and in those headache-inducing moments, we often rely on roadside assistance.So whether it s a flat tire, drained battery, empty gas tank, or four stubbornly locked doors, a little bad luck doesn t have to mean the end of your day.Check out the best Android apps for your daily driver Consumers are holding onto their vehicles a lot longer, thanks to higher quality parts and service, said Rob Infantino, founder and CEO of Openbay.Nearly 60 percent of the vehicles on the road are more than nine years old, and more likely to require roadside service than newer vehicles.Now, Openbay combines the convenience of on-demand roadside with our auto repair marketplace, delivering speed and removing hassle from car-care, and meeting the expectations consumers have with today s online and on-demand services.On-demand roadside assistance works in concert with the GPS system on your mobile device, as the app locates the nearest authorized repair technician and allows you to request specific services.
Pic: NASA TVBEAM isn't intended for general use, and astronauts will only enter "between 12 and 14 times during its stay" to assess its condition.At the end of the tests, BEAM will be jettisoned ahead of a fiery death in Earth's atmosphere.BootnoteHere's NASA's background blurb on Saffire:Despite decades of research into combustion and fire processes in reduced gravity, there have been very few experiments directly studying spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions.Prior experiments have been limited to samples no larger than 10 cm in length and width.The large differences between fire behavior in normal and reduced gravity results in a lack of experimental data that forces spacecraft designers to base their designs on terrestrial fires and fire standards.To address this knowledge gap, experiments in an expendable spacecraft are proposed and conducted without risk to crew or crewed spacecraft.
The demo offers an intriguing look at what is the most expansive Zelda yet, an open-world adventure that encourages you to go anywhere you like and take challenges as they come.But before any of that could happen, producer Eiji Aonuma had to overcome his great fear of letting players roam unguided.Aonuma says that game s 2-D bird s-eye view made it easier to find and follow your path.You soon find clothes, which you can swap throughout the game to increase your defensive capabilities.We realized that having something on the GamePad and looking back and forth between the TV screen and the GamePad actually disrupts the gameplay, and the concentration that the game player may be experiencing, Aonuma said.Considering how vast the world is, it would keep you from monopolizing the TV.
If humans are going to get to Mars, they re going to need rockets with some serious liftoff power.NASA s Space Launch System is the most powerful rocket in the world—it has twin five-segment solid rocket boosters, four liquid propellant engines, and a minimum of 70 metric tons of lifting power—but engineers won t know until June 28th if it s really going to work.At 8:05 am MDT on Tuesday, SLS will undergo a qualification ground test at Orbital ATK s facilities in Utah that will see if its systems are up to snuff.The qualification testing has over 80 objectives—basically, everything but launching skyward—to determine whether SLS is ready to send the Orion spacecraft on the first leg of Exploration Mission-1, an unmanned mission planned for 2018.EM-1 will take Orion 40,000 miles beyond the moon, which is further than any spacecraft built for humans has ever gone.We re going to go past the GPS system constellation, beyond the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, beyond the Earth s magnetic field.
Alleged to have sold hardware designs to undercover agentA US military contractor is alleged to have tried to sell Uncle Sam's satellite secrets to someone he thought was a Russian intelligence officer, the Feds claim.Gregory Allen Justice, 49, of Culver City, California, worked as a security tester on military satellites, including the GPS system, the Milstar military communications network, and various spying hardware in orbit.He was arrested by the FBI on Thursday after allegedly selling hardware designs to an undercover agent.The Feds claim that since February this year, Justice met the g-man five times, and allege that four of those times he was paid $500 or $1,000 for copies of satellite schematics, blueprints and test files.Justice did not have access to classified material, but, claimed Special Agent Peter Lee in an affidavit, he allegedly handed over proprietary trade secrets that, under international arms laws, could not be moved from the US without an export licence – in breach of arms laws, as well as trade secret protections.
Mercedes-Benz's autonomous bus has successfully navigated a 20km route involving tunnels, traffic lights and junctions in The Netherlands.There's been much focus on autonomous cars, and how the introduction of self-driving vehicles to cities across the globe could help ease traffic congestion while making travelling by road much safer.Much of that congestion on city roads is ultimately caused by the large numbers of single individuals using a vehicle to get from A to B -- so while self-driving cars might improve traffic, the roads are still likely to be very crowded.But what if public transport were converted to be autonomous, enabling self-driving vehicles to carry dozens of people at once and perhaps encouraging some motorists to give up their self-driving car to take a self-driving bus instead?German auto manufacturer Mercedes-Benz is looking to help solve traffic and gridlock issues through the Future Bus with CityPilot, a form of public transport which is capable of autonomous driving because, according to the company, "people's need for mobility to attend work and school and take recreation, cannot be met by private transport alone".The Mercedes-Benz Future Bus' CityPilot technology is based on Highway Pilot system found in the autonomous Mercedes-Benz Actros truck, but with adaptations that make it suited to an urban environment.
The smartphone app has now been launched in more than 40 countries, including the US and much of Europe.There's little doubt that Pokémon Go is a bonafide cultural phenomenon.Now, when you walk down any street you are likely to bump into someone playing the augmented reality smartphone application.This week, on 1 August, one man claimed to have 'hacked' the 17-inch monitor of a Tesla Model S so he could catch Pokémon using little more than the electric vehicles' rear camera, GPS system and an Ethernet cable.The only problem, as some critics suspected, was that it was yet another internet hoax.The website that first published the story, a US-based entertainment blog called Pink Java, claimed the widely popular game could be booted up on the Model S on-board computer system and claimed the only "hitch" was that the only way to catch Pokémon was in reverse as the Tesla's only camera is in its rear bumper.
Researchers at the National Physical Laboratory and the University of Leicester claim to have come up with some sort of GPS system equivalent for space travel, saying they've managed to track things up there to an accuracy of 30km at a distance as far away from us as Neptune.Their system uses signals picked up by X-ray telescopes from the rhythmic output of pulsars to work out exactly where in the universe a space ship might be, ignoring the inconvenient truth that humanity's most likely to perish here and in a few crappy prefabricated greenhouses on Mars, so such a system's never going to be needed.Dr John Pye, the manager of Leicester's Space Research Centre, said: "Up until now, the concept of pulsar-based navigation has been seen just as that – a concept.This simulation uses technology in the real world and proves its capabilities for this task.Our X-ray telescope can be feasibly launched into space due to its low weight and small size; indeed, it will be part of a mission to Mercury in 2018.NPL s timing analysis capability has been developed over many years due to its long heritage in atomic clocks."
Researchers at the National Physical Laboratory and the University of Leicester claim to have come up with some sort of GPS system equivalent for space travel, saying they've managed to track things up there to an accuracy of 30km at a distance as far away from us as Neptune.Their system uses signals picked up by X-ray telescopes from the rhythmic output of pulsars to work out exactly where in the universe a space ship might be, ignoring the inconvenient truth that humanity's most likely to perish here and in a few crappy prefabricated greenhouses on Mars, so such a system's never going to be needed.Dr John Pye, the manager of Leicester's Space Research Centre, said: "Up until now, the concept of pulsar-based navigation has been seen just as that – a concept.This simulation uses technology in the real world and proves its capabilities for this task.Our X-ray telescope can be feasibly launched into space due to its low weight and small size; indeed, it will be part of a mission to Mercury in 2018.NPL s timing analysis capability has been developed over many years due to its long heritage in atomic clocks."
A driverless bus has entered operation in Australia, making it the first autonomous vehicle to hit public roads in the country.Named the RAC Intellibus, the 11-seater vehicle will transport passengers along the 2.7km promenade in South Perth, travelling at speeds of up to 15.5mph.According to The Australian, the fully-electric shuttle bus has six Light Detection and Ranging Lidar sensors, four 3D imaging cameras and a GPS system that allows it to pinpoint exactly where it is, as well as how far it has travelled based on its starting point.The bus itself is a prototype vehicle by French EV manufacturer Navya, which was purchased by the Royal Automobile Club of Western Australia RAC WA for AUS $296,000 £168,000, €200,000 .More tech news from IBTimes UK Toshiba trialling 45-seater electric bus that can be charged wirelessly in 15 minutes Airbus to launch an autonomous flying taxi service within the next 10 years YouTube star PewDiePie sheds light on Isis joke that got him temporarily kicked off TwitterWhy advertise with usWhile the Intellibus can operate without a driver, a human 'chaperone' will ride the bus so that they can take control of the vehicle in an emergency.
With our busy lives, anything that promises peace of mind gets an automatic bid for headspace, and that is CalAmp s promise with its just-announced SureDrive by LoJack.SureDrive is an on-car connected car security platform with features that offer to make consumers lives easier and more secure.SureDrive helps protect your vehicle from theft but has convenience applications families could grow to love.The conventional LoJack system uses a radio signal transmitter than can be tracked by law enforcement when a car is reported stolen.SureDrive, however, is a consumer product based on a GPS system installed in your vehicle that is accessed, configured, and controlled with a smartphone app.If the car was stolen, you can contact law enforcement with one tap on your smartphone to let them know and provide information they can use to help find your car.
The clock is ticking for the world s most accurate working time piece, the NIST-F2 atomic clock operated by America s National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado.Now we ve scooped them, it is understandable that some might feel a bit sourThe US clock is a large, heavy machine, standing more than 2.5 metres high, with support facilities filling an entire room, but it is so accurate that it would lose just one second in 300 million years.In contrast, the Cold Atomic Clock in Space Cacs recently developed by researchers in Shanghai can easily be lifted by two people and would fit comfortably in the boot of a car.Credit: Chinese Academy of SciencesIt will be able to beat the US clock because it will have escaped the negative grip of gravity.
By Yon Heong TungChinese bike-sharing startup Mobike has set its eyes on Singapore s cycling community.Today, it announced it will be test trialling its bike-sharing service in Singapore.The first batch of Mobikes is expected to hit the roads and pavements of the city by the end of this year.The bike rental fee was not disclosed.This marks Mobike s first foray into an overseas market.Founded in 2015 by an ex-Uber China executive, Davis Wong, Mobike allows users to locate Mobikes through its app using the in-built GPS system.They can then book the bikes 15 minutes before and unlock the bikes using QR codes.Unlike some bike-sharing services that rely on designated kiosks, Mobike touts itself as a station-less bike system .Users can park the bikes at any public parking bicycle space.In China, the service was marred by several uncharitable users who sought ways to keep the bikes to themselves.According to a China Money Network report, some users stowed the bikes away in private apartment buildings and underground garages, others scratched off the QR codes.Still, investors seemed to have more faith in the communal goodwill of humanity.Panda Capital invested a sum of US$10 million into Mobike in August this year.The article entitled Mobike to test trial bike-sharing app in Singapore this year originally appeared on e27.
Also, Russia is planning its own satellite positioning system.the European positioning system Galileo is finally coming to the preliminary use of the american gps system alongside, told Technology & Economy.Consumers notice of Galileo, in particular, to better service urban areas, where gps use has been somewhat problematic.Galileo is estimated more reliable and accurate than gps.ESA's new Ariane 5 –rakentta take next week four new Galileo satellites into space.the Launch is historic, as previously Galileot have traveled into space only two by two, a Russian Soyuz-rocket ride.
Nowadays, it s no big deal to carry thousands of books on one compact e-reader, navigate busy streets to avoid emerging traffic jams in real time, or even plan an entire vacation getaway with a few taps on your phone.Yet, there was a time not terribly long ago when we were all super impressed with far simpler technologies.Thirty years after Oprah s Favorite Things debuted on The Oprah Winfrey Show, Oprah.com took a look back at some of these impressive tech giveaways that had people across the country shrieking in excitement.We re talking flip phones that took digital photos, a wireless emailer at your fingertips no, not a phone , an iPod that held 3,700 songs, a $1,400 GPS system, a camcorder that used an actual DVD to record video and plenty more pieces of technology.The supercut above shows off these innovations in a hilarious flashback that brings to mind an age-old platitude: My, how far we ve come.
More accurate than American system and open to allAfter a long and much-delayed 17-year gestation, Europe's answer to America's GPS system has been switched on."Geo-localisation is at the heart of the ongoing digital revolution with new services that transform our daily lives," said Maroš Šefčovič, vice-president of the European Commission."Galileo will increase geo-location precision ten-fold and enable the next generation of location-based technologies; such as autonomous cars, connected devices, or smart city services.Galileo's high level of accuracy comes from the four precise atomic clocks each satellite holds, which will only lose one second in three million years.When a device hears from four of the satellites, it can work out its location down to a few centimeters.
If you re not sure just how worried Europe is about the domination of tech by the U.S., consider this: The continent just spent 17 years and $11 billion developing its own GPS network.This week, the European Union announced that Galileo, a global positioning system that it says is superior to the one maintained by the United States, has at last gone live.Even after almost two decades, Galileo is still in its early stages.It consists of just 18 satellites and still must work with the U.S. GPS system to provide global coverage.But by 2020, the EU hopes for Galileo to be completely self-reliant.And it claims that the new system is far more precise.Galileo will increase geo-localisation precision tenfold, European Commission vice president Maros Sefcovic said, according to France 24.Galileo will be able to pinpoint an object to within 3.3 feet, compared to a much larger area for standard GPS.The opening of Galileo comes as Russia is building its own GPS network, GLONASS, and China is launching its own, as well.GPS has become a critical technology, in general.
To continue providing news and award winning journalism, we rely on advertising revenue.To continue reading, please turn off your ad blocker or whitelist us.After going through 17 years in development, Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system is going live aiming to provide better-than-ever location services.The global navigation satellite system, which faced several years of setbacks and budgetary increases, has been created by the European Union EU through the European Space Agency ESA and the European GNSS Agency GSA and aims to provide the most accurate navigation technology.However, for now 18 satellites have been initially activated that will provide limited usage only for smartphones and in-car systems.The satellites will be initially boosted by satellites from the American GPS system and Russian Glonass systems.
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