A teenager got a big surprise while looking for arrowheads on an Iowa farm.Instead of any arrowheads, the teen found a 30-inch jaw bone of a mastodon -- a prehistoric hairy elephant, related to the mammoth.Mastodons went extinct about 10,000 years ago, according to LiveScience.A paleontology team from the University of Iowa (UI) picked up the jaw bone and other related bones over the weekend, according to WHOTV.“We were notified a couple of weeks ago that somebody had found a fossil in the middle of a small river on the property,” Tiffany Adrain, the head of the UI Paleontology Repository told the outlet.“It was actually a high school student who had found the object, and the landowners contacted us and notified us [and] sent us photographs.
In 2010, archaeologists found evidence of a previously unknown hominin, the Denisovans, in a Siberian cave.This Denisovan mandible was discovered nearly 40 years ago by a monk who was wandering through Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe, China.We suspected this day would come, and it’s finally happened—the first fossil evidence of this species outside of Denisova cave, which is located in the Siberian Altai Mountains.Today, bits of Denisovan DNA linger on in present day Asian, Australian, and Melanesian populations.Indeed, a remarkable and puzzling aspect of Denisovan DNA is the presence of an allele known as EPAS1.This genetic mutation confers resistance to hypoxia, otherwise known as altitude sickness.
In 2010, archaeologists found evidence of a previously unknown hominin, the Denisovans, in a Siberian cave.This Denisovan mandible was discovered nearly 40 years ago by a monk who was wandering through Baishiya Karst Cave in Xiahe, China.We suspected this day would come, and it’s finally happened—the first fossil evidence of this species outside of Denisova cave, which is located in the Siberian Altai Mountains.Today, bits of Denisovan DNA linger on in present day Asian, Australian, and Melanesian populations.Indeed, a remarkable and puzzling aspect of Denisovan DNA is the presence of an allele known as EPAS1.This genetic mutation confers resistance to hypoxia, otherwise known as altitude sickness.
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