The human mind may be good at multitasking and forming habits, but that doesn't mean we're immune to mistakes when we go about our daily routine.Technology is striking yet again with a solution in the form of the Watch-Bot - a silent-observing robot that learns everyday actions and, through machine learning, actually points out when you've forgotten something.Presented as part of the International Conference on Robotics and Automation by researchers from Cornell and Stanford, the Watch-Bot is comprised of a second-generation Kinect sensor attached to a tripod-mounted camera, laptop and laser pointer.Once someone fails to perform an action completely - be it forgetting to take food out of the microwave or not putting a book back on the shelf - the Watch-Bot shines the laser pointer at the site of the error, "reminding" those nearby that something is amiss.Researchers write in their official study that the Watch-Bot's setup "can be easily deployed on any assistive robot," which opens up a range of practical uses for the machine besides passive-aggresively reminding you to do the dishes.This could potentially include assisting the memory of those struggling with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, or increase safety in hazardous job sites where absent-mindedness carries dangerous consequences.
More and more older people and people with disabilities have digital security alarms - but still over half analog. The Government's aim that all alarms should be digital in December this year will thus not be reached, the National Board. The purpose of the technology shift is to increase safety and security. Analog security alarms combined with new digital communications involves a risk that the alarm signal is lost and does not reach the monitoring station. In January, there were about 207,000 security alarms in the country. Get the news you're going to talk about in your Facebook feed - like Metro Sweden
The Government's aim that all safety alarms should be digital by year's end will not be achieved, the National Board. photographer: TT More and more older people and people with disabilities have digital security alarms - but still over half analog. The Government's aim that all alarms should be digital in December this year will thus not be reached, the National Board. The purpose of the technology shift is to increase safety and security. Analog security alarms combined with new digital communications involves a risk that the alarm signal is lost and does not reach the monitoring station. In January, there were about 207,000 security alarms in the country.
Gas prices are low, school is out, and the summer road trip season has officially begun.The beginning of June heralded the start of what is often known as the 100 deadliest days of driving for teenagers, and now, in hopes of saving young drivers from becoming statistics, Verizon has introduced a new campaign to help increase safety for teens this summer.The self-installed solution promises to make almost any car manufactured after 1996 smarter, safer, and more connected by way of the reader, which plugs directly into a car s OBD-II port.With Hum, drivers will be privy to speed and boundary alerts, monitoring of vehicle location including stolen vehicle assistance , vehicle diagnostics, a mechanics hotline, and even pinpoint and emergency roadside assistance.Hum gives teen drivers and their parents peace of mind knowing they can be assisted while they re driving and when issues arise, said Jay Jaffin, vice president of marketing at Verizon Telematics.If your teen tells you they re going to the library, you can set a boundary alert that can send you a text message if they re actually going somewhere else instead.
By 2018, all new cars will be required to include backup cameras, thanks to a new set of regulations implemented by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NHTSA .But until that time comes, many cars new and old will still be sold without an integrated camera.Designed by a group of ex-Apple employees, Pearl RearVision is a smart backup camera designed to work hand-in-hand with vehicles to help increase safety, both for the driver and bystanders.Powering the visuals of the wireless device is a pair of high-definition cameras, which are secured inside a custom license plate mount.The Pearl RearView is currently available for pre-order.At $500, it s quite pricey compared to other third-party backup cameras, but Pearl hopes its simple setup, all-in-one solution, and three-year warranty will entice consumers to bite the bullet.
Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk delivered part 2 of his master plan today, and two big parts of it are new vehicles, but not consumer models: Tesla is working on both a heavy-duty semi truck and a high passenger-density urban transport that would operate in cities and fit the role of a bus in city settings.In the post describing this next stage to the now-famous master plan, Musk talked about additional consumer vehicles, including both a compact SUV separate from the Model X, and a new kind of pickup truck, both of which he s alluded to before.But he said that besides their consumer offerings, two other kinds of electric vehicles are needed : the semi truck, and the so-called urban transport, both of which are going to be ready to show to the public as early as next year according to Musk.The reason the Tesla Semi as Musk refers to the truck is necessary is because it should help drastically reduce cargo transportation costs fuel represents a significant portion of trucking costs, and that s passed on to the consumer .It s also key because a Tesla transport would increase safety, Musk says, as well as making it really fun for vehicle operators.Featured Image: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
From bikinis to luggage, Vodafone details IOT proof of concept projectVodafone in Spain has developed a proof-of-concept smart wearables summer collection to increase safety measures and ease of access on holiday.The development stems from a European survey which found 48% of Europeans forget to apply sunscreen while 30% said they have lost luggage.So Vodafone is researching what it says is a cost-effective solution using the Internet of Things IoT .The smart collection includes, connected swimwear, children s sunhats and suitcases using revolutionary methods of IoT.The products promise to prevent sunburn, children getting lost on the beach and losing luggage.
Drone safety, from privacy issues to crashing over unsuspecting pedestrians, has been a concern since, well, the dawn of the drone.But one startup is working to use artificial intelligence to help drone pilots pick the safest route.Flock, an artificial intelligence company formed out of Imperial College London, Oxford University and Cambridge University, is currently developing a risk analysis program for commercial drones, from aerial photographers to drone use on a larger scale, such as delivering Amazon packages.The program uses real-time weather information and the location of buildings.But what s perhaps even more impressive is that the system can also predict what areas will be full of people so it can choose a route around congested areas or a time when those areas will be less crowded.We extract actionable insights and predictions from big data by extracting multiple data sources and amassing a wealth of historical data in cities, Flock CEO Ed Leon Klinger told Digital Trends.
We ve seen numerous car manufacturers and tech companies make noise about their plans to launch autonomous vehicles in the near future, including Tesla, Google, Ford and BMW.But it looks like Uber will beat them to the punch in bringing self-driving technology to consumers.Bloomberg reports that Uber will roll out a small number of modified self-driving Volvo XC90 SUVs from its 100-vehicle fleet in downtown Pittsburgh later this month.But you ll still be in the back seat, as each car will have a human supervisor behind the wheel.Passengers in Pittsburgh will be assigned these vehicles at random, and won t be charged a fee for their trips.CEO Travis Kalanick believes that this initiative will drive ride costs down and increase safety in the long run.
It's been 15-years in the making, each cost nearly $90 million, and after being plagued with setbacks has recently been declared ready for combat.Inside the cockpit of the advanced F-35A Lightning II, pilots will be stepping into the future as they literally plug themselves into the plane through a revolutionary new helmet that lets them sense everything that's going on during missions, projecting information on to a display in front of their eyes.This technology, called Distributed Aperture System, or DAC, is a revolutionary step for the modern-day fighter pilot and will replace a traditional heads-up display screen in cockpits for the first time in 50 years.In what would make the average person quickly go green with nausea, skilled pilots are able to turn their heads and 'see-through' their plane during combat in order to help see enemy planes or targets – all while flying their jet at speed.As well as useful in combat situations it will help increase safety as it allows pilots to quickly see horizons and know where the ground is during dizzying manoeuvres.Night vision is also built into the helmet, with a zoom function to improve situational awareness and eye threats or targets on the ground.
the Helsinki-based entrepreneur Hanna Sissala come up with a solution for the crying baby in his sleep foundation.Sissala told that her baby fell asleep only to go by, so he decided to develop a baby sleep lull into the mattress.Sissalan-designed mattress will lull your baby to sleep in the swings back and forth.the Mattress is meant to remind baby of the safe movement, for example, in the womb and lap.the Mattress is designed in such a way that the child is able to breathe through the fabric even if you end up your belly.In the mattress of the moving parts is, again, it is the manufacturer according to the isolated increase safety, far from baby.
the Helsinki-based entrepreneur Hanna Sissala come up with a solution for the crying baby in his sleep foundation.Sissala told that her baby fell asleep only to go by, so he decided to develop a baby sleep lull into the mattress.Sissalan-designed mattress will lull your baby to sleep in the swings back and forth.the Mattress is meant to remind baby of the safe movement, for example, in the womb and lap.the Mattress is designed in such a way that the child is able to breathe through the fabric even if you end up your belly.In the mattress of the moving parts is, again, it is the manufacturer according to the isolated increase safety, far from baby.
Australian National University finds nanoparticle breakthrough for next-level waterproofing.We have noticed you are using an ad blockerTo continue providing news and award winning journalism, we rely on advertising revenue.To continue reading, please turn off your ad blocker or whitelist us.If you have not been able to bag an iPhone 7 or are still looking jealously at your friend's dunk-proof Galaxy, do not worry as scientists have created a super-hydrophobic coating that could offer next level water-resistance to gadgets as well as increase safety for aeroplanes and give skyscrapers self-cleaning windows.The breakthrough, spray-on material, which has been developed at the Australian National University, has a remarkable ability to repel water, thanks to a surface layer of nanoparticles "which water slides off as if it's on a hot barbeque", explained William Wong from the Nanotechnology Research Laboratory at ANU.
View photosMoreFILE PHOTO -- An Autonomous trucking start-up Otto vehicle is shown during an announcing event in Concord, California, U.S. August 4, 2016.SAN FRANCISCO Reuters - In the first real-world commercial use of autonomous trucking, some 45,000 cans of Budweiser beer arrived late last week to a warehouse after traveling over 120 highway miles in a self-driving truck with no driver at the wheel, executives from Uber UBER.UL and Anheuser-Busch said.Otto, the self-driving truck subsidiary of Uber, shipped a truckload of Budweiser from Fort Collins, Colorado to Colorado Springs last Thursday with the driver monitoring from the truck's sleeper berth for the entire two-hour journey, Otto's co-founder Lior Ron and Anheuser-Busch's senior director of logistics strategy, James Sembrot, told Reuters on Friday.The early morning drive at an average speed of 55mph 89 kph marks what the two executives said was the first revenue generating load transported via autonomous truck.Otto was paid the market rate of $470 for the job using one of its trucks outfitted with the new technology.Otto and Anheuser-Busch enlisted the support of the state of Colorado before the drive, and the state patrol monitored it, although Colorado and most other U.S. states do not expressly prohibit self-driving trucks.
Application of integrated circuitry leads to a new approach to LiDAR sensors for the autonomous vehicle, 3D mapping, and drone industries MORGAN HILL, Calif.– BUSINESS WIRE –December 13, 2016– Velodyne LiDAR Inc., the recognized global leader in Light, Detection and Ranging LiDAR technology, today announced a groundbreaking design for a solid-state LiDAR sensor that can deliver a subsystem cost of under $50 U.S. when sold in high-volume manufacturing scale.View the full release here: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20161213005517/en/ Velodyne LiDAR GaN integrated circuit Photo: Business Wire The technology will impact the proliferation of LiDAR sensors in multiple industry sectors, including autonomous vehicles, ridesharing, 3D mapping, and drones.LiDAR sensors that leverage this new design will be less expensive, easier to integrate due to their smaller size, and more reliable as a result of fewer moving parts.The technology can also be integrated in Velodyne LiDAR s existing Puck form factors.Our new design approach creates a true solid-state LiDAR sensor, while significantly raising the bar as to what can be expected from LiDAR sensors as far as cost, size, and reliability, said David Hall, founder and CEO, Velodyne LiDAR.Together with our customers and partners, we strive to create a world where LiDAR sensors increase safety and freedom for people everywhere, and this new design is a huge step in that direction.
After seven model years and hundreds of thousands of units sold, it's finally time for Nissan to reveal a new Leaf.The Japanese automaker has just confirmed that its second-generation all-electric hatchback will bow on September 6, although it remains cagey about further details.The next Leaf is expected to draw its styling inspiration from Nissan's well-received IDS Concept, an aggressive-looking five-door showcar from 2015 featuring next-generation electric propulsion as well as autonomous drive tech.The new hatchback -- which will likely come to market as a 2018 model -- is expected to substantially improve on the 107-mile range offered in today's car.Fresher competitors like the Chevrolet Bolt EV, Hyundai Ioniq and next-generation Volkswagen E-Golf have all eclipsed Nissan's pioneering EV in both range and in-car electronics, and Tesla's Model 3 looms large over the segment (even though it hasn't been shown in production form yet).In other words, Nissan is going to have to seriously up the Leaf's technology game in order to compete in this small but fiercely competitive segment.
A University of South Carolina researcher in the College of Engineering and Computing is the principal investigator for a new NASA-funded $4.4 million research project to address limitations in aircraft communication networks to improve operations and increase safety.USC electrical engineering professor David W. Matolak and his team will brief members of NASA leadership and Congress about improvements needed for an ATM system that is unprepared to handle rapidly expanding air travel and air transport in the U.S and globally.Of particular concern are safety issues caused by the rise of unmanned drone aircraft sharing airspace with conventional manned aircraft.The NASA award is part of the agency's University Leadership Initiative, in which select universities identify their own projects and lead the technical work with other universities and companies to solve aviation challenges.Over the next three years, the research will address several challenges to the current ATM systems, including:Communication systems that are severely inadequate for future air traffic density and complexity
- A technology being developed at Purdue University could provide an affordable, smart, self-learning device that, when placed into existing MRI machines could allow medical professionals to monitor patients more effectively and safely, by performing concurrent medical imaging and recording for diagnostic purposes.Purdue researchers recently presented their findings, "Multimodal Imaging: MR-Compatible, Gradient Artifact free, Wireless recording system integrated with MR-scanner for Simultaneous EEG and fMRI acquisition," at the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine conference in Honolulu, Hawaii.The article also received an ISMRM magna cum laude merit award, and power-pitch highlight, for highly-rated scientific merits.The technology was developed by Ranajay Mandal and Nishant Babaria, graduate research assistants in Purdue's College of Engineering, under the supervision of Zhongming Liu, an assistant professor in the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering."However, when a patient is receiving an MRI scan, it is very difficult to also monitor brainwaves, ECG, or other biological signals.There is tremendous scientific and clinical value in using multiple technologies together on a single platform."
The U.S. House approved a bill called the SELF-DRIVE act, which was put together by both Democrats and Republicans – a rarity in today’s congressional goings-on.If it becomes law (which still requires it to pass the Senate), then it would make it possible for companies working on self-driving to field a lot more vehicles per year – as many as 100,000 autonomous test cars annually, in fact.Basically, the proposed bill would make it possible for companies including Ford, Waymo, GM’s Cruise and others to bypass some safety standards that currently apply to human piloted cars, including requirements like that they have steering wheels and gas pedals on board.This legislation would also supersede state-by-state rules, making it possible for autonomous testing to proceed on a level playing field across the U.S.The Self-Driving Coalition for Safer Streets, which is an industry group including Ford, Lyft, Uber, Volvo Group and Waymo, provided the following statement from general counsel David Strickland to TechCrunch:Self-driving vehicles offer an opportunity to significantly increase safety, improve transportation access for underserved communities, and transform how people, goods and services get from point A to B.
Rolls-Royce is designing an autonomous naval ship capable of patrol, surveillance, mine detection and fleet screening.With a top speed above 25 knots, the ship maintains a range of 3,500 nautical miles.The company is banking on a future where large, human operated, ships operate in consonance with smaller autonomous ships.Automating traditionally manual operations has the potential to simultaneously save money and increase safety.But without humans on board, nobody is physically standing by in the event of a malfunction.Rolls-Royce says it prioritized the reliability of its power and propulsion systems to reduce the number of unsolvable maintenance issues.
More

Top