The operational software requirements for nonprofits have substantial differences from platforms intended for use at businesses operating on a for-profit basis.Here are four reasons to connect nonprofit databases to Salesforce nonprofit software or another platform for not-for-profit organizations.They Understand The Unique Nonprofit IndustryA company such as Blackbaud stands out for their long legacy of developing software for nonprofits such as cultural organizations, healthcare groups, faith communities and schools.More than 30 years later, the latest cloud-based version of this software is still used by many not-for-profits.The Raiser’s Edge NXT is often the natural choice for a nonprofit that has the budget necessary to devote thousands of dollars toward licensing fees.While a charitable or not-for-profit organization may find Salesforce and some of the same customer relationship management tools helpful for staying in touch with supporters or soliciting and tracking donations, this platform requires fine adjustments and integration tools to be deployed to maximum effect in the nonprofit sector.Developers and users of the open-source Salesforce Nonprofit Success Pack or NPSP, which launched in 2005, have also become experts at adjusting for-profit CRM software for the purpose of running nonprofits.The donor communication, fundraising and analytics features of this software for nonprofits have unique features compared to the standard Salesforce installation and Raiser’s Edge NXT.A private and proprietary donor management system may have a faster implementation time in exchange for a more substantial investment in licensing.Open-source solutions often require more fine-tuning.
The operational software requirements for nonprofits have substantial differences from platforms intended for use at businesses operating on a for-profit basis.Here are four reasons to connect nonprofit databases to Salesforce nonprofit software or another platform for not-for-profit organizations.They Understand The Unique Nonprofit IndustryA company such as Blackbaud stands out for their long legacy of developing software for nonprofits such as cultural organizations, healthcare groups, faith communities and schools.More than 30 years later, the latest cloud-based version of this software is still used by many not-for-profits.The Raiser’s Edge NXT is often the natural choice for a nonprofit that has the budget necessary to devote thousands of dollars toward licensing fees.While a charitable or not-for-profit organization may find Salesforce and some of the same customer relationship management tools helpful for staying in touch with supporters or soliciting and tracking donations, this platform requires fine adjustments and integration tools to be deployed to maximum effect in the nonprofit sector.Developers and users of the open-source Salesforce Nonprofit Success Pack or NPSP, which launched in 2005, have also become experts at adjusting for-profit CRM software for the purpose of running nonprofits.The donor communication, fundraising and analytics features of this software for nonprofits have unique features compared to the standard Salesforce installation and Raiser’s Edge NXT.A private and proprietary donor management system may have a faster implementation time in exchange for a more substantial investment in licensing.Open-source solutions often require more fine-tuning.
On Wednesday, Google CEO Sundar Pichai will testify before Congress alongside the CEOs of Apple, Amazon, and Facebook in a grilling on antitrust. In his opening remarks, Pichai will argue that Google operates in a "highly competitive market" and make the point that users have access to search tools outside of Google's own. He'll also argue that competition in ads from the likes of Twitter has driven down costs that benefit consumers. He'll also say that free Google services like Search, Gmail, Maps, and Photos "provide thousands of dollars a year in value to the average American." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. CEO Sundar Pichai will tell an antitrust committee on Wednesday that Google operates in a highly competetive market, and make the case that the company is a benefit both as an investor to America and a provider of free services to users. Pichai, who will be grilled by the Congressional committee over whether Google has acted anticompetetively, will argue that Google functions "in highly competitive and dynamic global markets, in which prices are free or falling, and products are constantly improving." He'll even name-check some competitors, according to an early version of the testimony seen by Business Insider, in order to make a point that users have access to search in other ways outside of Google. "You can ask Alexa a question from your kitchen; read your news on Twitter; ask friends for information via WhatsApp; and get recommendations on Snapchat or Pinterest," Pichai will say. "When searching for products online, you may be visiting Amazon, eBay, Walmart, or any one of a number of e-commerce providers, where most online shopping queries happen." As for ads, Pichai will say competition from the likes of Twitter and Facebook-owned Instagram "has helped lower online advertising costs by 40% over the last 10 years, with these savings passed down to consumers through lower prices." Pichai will also make the case that Google was the "largest capital investor" in America in 2018 by one estimate. And interestingly, he'll state the case that free Google services like Search, Gmail, Maps, and Photos "provide thousands of dollars a year in value to the average American," based on a study. Here are his prepared remarks in full: Chairman Cicilline, Ranking Member Sensenbrenner, and distinguished members of the Subcommittee, thank you for this opportunity to appear before you today. At its heart, a discussion about competition is a discussion about opportunity. This has never been more important, as the global pandemic poses dual challenges to our health and our economy. Expanding access to opportunity through technology is deeply personal to me. I didn't have much access to a computer growing up in India. So you can imagine my amazement when I arrived in the U.S. for graduate school and saw an entire lab of computers I could use whenever I wanted. Accessing the internet for the first time in that computer lab set me on a path to bring technology to as many people as possible. It's what inspired me to join Google 16 years ago. And it's what led me to help create Google's first browser, Chrome . . . not because I thought the world needed another browser, but because a better browser could open up the web to more people. I couldn't have imagined then that, eleven years later, so many people would experience the web through Chrome, for free. At Google, we take pride in the number of people who choose our products and services; we're even prouder of what they do with them — whether it's the 140 million students and educators using G Suite for Education to stay connected during the pandemic . . . the 5 million Americans gaining digital skills through Grow with Google, part of our $1 billion initiative to expand economic opportunity . . . or the millions of small business owners connecting with customers through Google products such as Maps and Search. Our work would not be possible without the long tradition of American innovation, and we're proud to contribute to its future. Founded in Silicon Valley, we now employ more than 120,000 Googlers around the world — more than 75,000 here in the U.S., across offices and data centers in 26 states. PPI estimated that in 2018 alone we invested more than $20 billion across the U.S., citing us as the largest capital investor in America that year. It's also ranked us in the top ve U.S. investors for the last three years. An important way we contribute is by building products that are helpful to American users in moments big and small, whether they are looking for a faster route home, learning how to cook a new dish on YouTube, or growing a small business. Survey research found that free services like Search, Gmail, Maps, and Photos provide thousands of dollars a year in value to the average American. Many are small business owners who have used our digital tools to grow. For example, Fat Witch Bakery is a New York City-based bakery that for decades has been known for its delicious brownies. For over 17 years, Fat Witch and its founder Patricia Helding have been Google Ads customers. The Fat Witch team uses free tools like Google My Business to interact with their customers and to keep them informed, with over 200 reviews on their profile and counting. They also use free tools like Google Analytics to track the effectiveness of their marketing spend. Online has been a lifeline for so many businesses, especially during the global pandemic. For example, by the time COVID-19 forced Texas to shelter in place, Kelebell Kings, an Austin-based fitness company, had already been investing in Google Ads and Analytics for nearly a decade. When the lockdown orders led to a surge in sales for home fitness equipment, Kelebell was prepared to adjust its digital offerings to capture the market, and its YouTube Channel grew 20%, helping them to grow their digital revenue and sales, which are up 3000% since COVID hit. Nearly one-third of small business owners say that without digital tools they would have had to close all or part of their business during COVID. I am deeply proud that because of our tools, businesses on Main Street can compete in a way that wasn't possible 20 years ago, including globally. For example, Berry Digital Solutions is a digital marketing firm in Urbana, Ohio, that supports local small businesses. They use Google tools to work remotely during the pandemic, coordinating meetings through Google Calendar and collaborating on content in Google Docs. They help their clients use Google Ads, and they appreciate that you only pay when someone clicks on your ad. The Berry Digital team also uses Google Analytics to learn more about the customers of their clients and how they can beer serve them. Another way we contribute is by making deep technology investments in America's future. Every year, we are among the world's biggest investors in research and development. At the end of 2019, our R&D spend had increased almost 10 times over 10 years, from $2.8 billion to $26 billion. We've invested over $90 billion over the last 5 years. Through these investments, our teams of engineers are helping America solidify its position as the global leader in emerging technologies like artificial intelligence, self-driving cars, and quantum computing. For example, last fall, our team of researchers based here in the U.S. was the first to reach a quantum computing milestone, a discovery that could eventually lead to new breakthroughs in medicine and more efficient batteries. Just as American leadership in these areas is not inevitable, we know Google's continued success is not guaranteed. Google operates in highly competitive and dynamic global markets, in which prices are free or falling, and products are constantly improving. Today's competitive landscape looks nothing like it did 5 years ago, let alone 21 years ago, when Google launched its rst product, Google Search. For example, people have more ways to search for information than ever before — and increasingly this is happening outside the context of only a search engine. Often the answer is just a click or an app away: You can ask Alexa a question from your kitchen; read your news on Twitter; ask friends for information via WhatsApp; and get recommendations on Snapchat or Pinterest. When searching for products online, you may be visiting Amazon, eBay, Walmart, or any one of a number of e-commerce providers, where most online shopping queries happen. Similarly, in areas like travel and real estate, Google faces strong competition for search queries from many businesses that are experts in these areas. A competitive digital ad marketplace gives publishers and advertisers, and therefore consumers, an enormous amount of choice. For example, competition in ads — from Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Comcast and others — has helped lower online advertising costs by 40% over the last 10 years, with these savings passed down to consumers through lower prices. We also deliberately build platforms that support the innovation of others. Using Android — a product I worked on for many years — thousands of device makers and mobile operators build and sell devices without any licensing fees to us or any requirement to integrate our products. This greatly reduces device prices, and today billions of consumers around the globe are now able to afford cuing-edge smartphones, some for less than $50. And in doing so they are able to access new opportunities — whether it's sharing a video with friends and family around the world, gaining an education for themselves or their children, or staring a business. Competition also sets higher standards for privacy and security. I've always believed that privacy is a universal right and should be available to everyone, and Google is committed to keeping your information safe, treating it responsibly, and putting you in control of what you choose to share. We also never sell user information to third parties. But more must be done to protect users across industries, which is why we've long supported the creation of comprehensive federal privacy laws. To this day, I haven't forgotten how access to innovation and technology altered the course of my life. Google aims to build products that increase access to opportunity for everyone — no matter where you live, what you believe, or how much money you earn. We are committed to partnering with lawmakers, including the members of this Committee, to protect consumers, maintain America's competitive technological edge in the world, and ensure that every American has access to the incredible opportunities that technology creates. Thank you.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
Failing mega-group discovers again it didn't buy the right biz Arm was pressured by its owner SoftBank to jack up its processor core licensing fees for some of its customers in an effort to squeeze more money out of its $32bn buy of the British chip designer, sources say.…
  If you're thinking about upgrading from AX to Finance and Operations, or if you're wondering if you should upgrade at all, you are not alone.Upgrading has a large effect on your organization and now is a fantastic time to learn about and start planning your update.The Microsoft Cloud provides Moreover, the cloud is a scalable alternative, so no matter where your company is going in the future, you are always going to have an option that fits your needs and size.The pricing version for Dynamics 365 essentially shifts business costs from infrastructure and IT and reallocates those costs to licensing fees.A cloud version gives more visibility into the tough costs or operating expenses of your answer and a more predictable price with time.
 If you're thinking about upgrading from AX to Finance and Operations, or if you're wondering if you should upgrade at all, you are not alone.Upgrading has a large effect on your organization and now is a fantastic time to learn about and start planning your update.The Microsoft Cloud provides Moreover, the cloud is a scalable alternative, so no matter where your company is going in the future, you are always going to have an option that fits your needs and size.The pricing version for Dynamics 365 essentially shifts business costs from infrastructure and IT and reallocates those costs to licensing fees.A cloud version gives more visibility into the tough costs or operating expenses of your answer and a more predictable price with time.To read more –  http://bit.ly/34VaHu9
  If you're thinking about upgrading from AX to Finance and Operations, or if you're wondering if you should upgrade at all, you are not alone.Upgrading has a large effect on your organization and now is a fantastic time to learn about and start planning your update.The Microsoft Cloud provides Moreover, the cloud is a scalable alternative, so no matter where your company is going in the future, you are always going to have an option that fits your needs and size.The pricing version for Dynamics 365 essentially shifts business costs from infrastructure and IT and reallocates those costs to licensing fees.A cloud version gives more visibility into the tough costs or operating expenses of your answer and a more predictable price with time.To read more –  http://bit.ly/34VaHu9
After some good, old-fashioned rooting around, it seems that Google disabled the Pixel 4's DisplayPort Alt Mode over USB in the kernel source code.XDA-Developers editor-in-chief, Mishaal Rahman, shared the discovery on Twitter, pointing out that there doesn't seem to be a reason as to why this is the case.The Qualcomm chips offer native support for DisplayPort Alt Mode, while Rahman adds that it's not even as if licensing fees could be the culprit.Google explicitly disabled it in the kernel during development.Qualcomm chips since the 835 natively support DisplayPort Alt Mode.https://t.co/Bv94GsqLFLThere's not even a licensing fee involved.
Facebook wants you to head to its site and apps for news coverage as well as memes that your friends and family are sharing: the social media giant has apparently struck a deal with news providers that will let it display headlines in a dedicated news tab.That's as per a report from the Wall Street Journal, which says licensing fees and other details have been worked out with the WSJ, the New York Post, the Washington Post, BuzzFeed News and Business Insider.Part of the negotiations involved working out how paywalls would be handled, the WSJ says – news providers aren't going to want to give away all their stories for free.According to inside sources, not all of the 200 or so news outlets will be paid, but for the biggest ones, the licensing fees could run into the millions of dollars per year.Have they got news for youBoth human editors and algorithms are going to be used to pick the best stories of the day, the WSJ reports, and there won't be any advertising in this new news tab.
Upgrading from Microsoft Dynamics AX to Microsoft Dynamics 365 has a large impact on your business or organization.However, the business who already have switched to Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance and Operations are further reaping its benefits like cloud security, cost of ownership, support, user experience, additional features, integration, business insights, and many more.Let us do have a look in details: The cloud securityMicrosoft is one of the scalable solutions which provides security monitoring and threat management, leaving your team to focus other available task.Today, cloud security is one of the primary concerns which invoke dubiety.Though, it has opened many doors to massive opportunities by helping businesses access technology that would have been out of reach in the present scenario of traditional computing.Cost of ownershipWith Microsoft Dynamics 365 cloud, your organization can only pay for the licensing fees that reduce money spent on IT infrastructure, maintenance, and operational expenses.With Microsoft Dynamics AX, support will come to an end because of updates which no longer requires large time and financial investment.
A US appeals court on Friday froze an antitrust ruling against Qualcomm, allowing the chipmaker to maintain its current business practices for now.Qualcomm has been embroiled in a lawsuit with the US Federal Trade Commission, which two years ago accused the chipmaker of operating a monopoly and forcing Apple and other customers to work with it exclusively.The Ninth US Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco granted Qualcomm's request to stay an order that it change how it licenses its technology.In May, US District Court Judge Lucy Koh ruled that Qualcomm used its dominance to force unnecessary licensing fees on phone makers and illegally hurt competitors in the wireless-chip market.Qualcomm said its practices were lawful and justified and that Koh's ruling would hurt the company as it appealed the case, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal.The appeals court's decision means Qualcomm doesn't have to change its business practices during the course of the litigation, which may last another year.
Qualcomm revenues fell by 13 per cent year-on-year to $4.9 billion during the third quarter of 2019, with struggles in China named as the main culprit.In particular, the company suffered from Huawei’s gains in its home market.Qualcomm is a major supplier for the likes of Xiaomi and Oppo, but Huawei manufacturers many of its components – including processors – in-house.Combined with the fact that many manufacturers are managing inventory as they prepare for the launch of 5G handsets over the next year or so, and it was a challenging quarter for the San Diego-based chip giant.However, the company is confident that demand for 5G components coupled with licensing fees for its patents will see it in a better place by 2020.“Today, we are the only chipset vendor that has 5G system level solutions spanning both sub6 GHz and millimetre bands,” declared CEO Steve Mollenkopf.
Apple is getting closer to buying Intel's smartphone modem business, with the iPhone maker now in "advanced talks" with Intel, The Wall Street Journal has reported.The deal could be worth $1 billion and include patents and employees, according to the report Monday afternoon.Such a deal could help Apple's attempts to develop its own 5G chip for the iPhone.It follows a report last month that Apple is looking to acquire Intel's German smartphone modem business, too.Apple had originally used modems from German company Infineon when it first launched the iPhone 10 years ago, before switching to Qualcomm in 2011.Intel then bought Infineon in 2011, but those chips weren't used again until the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus in 2016 after a dispute over Qualcomm's licensing fees.
The oddness kicked off on 1 July when a tweet and Instagram post detailing the "all-new" Windows 1.0 appeared on a feed more accustomed to wearily plugging Bing pictures for desktop backgrounds or dropping tips on using Windows 10.Unsurprisingly, those tips don't include "Just don't".However, a mock promo video, replete with '80s-esque music and visuals, popped up as the account excitedly plugged the arrival of a Clock, MS-DOS executive "and more."Social media mavens speculated that the posting could indicate an open-sourcing of the Windows 1.0 code or, more likely, a hop on the Stranger Things 3 marketing bandwagon (presumably without the licensing fees demanded by Queen of the Streams, Netflix.)Windows 1.0 debuted in November 1985 (the same year Netflix's show is set) and tottered atop MS-DOS.The graphical shell demanded users get to grips with a mouse, didn't allow overlapping Windows and had some hefty hardware requirements (for the time) to be usable.
The cat is out of the bag and Steve Ballmer’s worst nightmare has just come true.Now a Microsoft engineer has just admitted that Azure customers have preferred using Linux instead of Windows servers.Reports have been pointing to the rise of the use of Linux in Azure.All around the world, governments and institutions are switching to Linux due to the steep licensing fees Microsoft demands from customers.More than just saving on money, which is always an important consideration for this class of users, the situation has also caused the to reevaluate their use of proprietary software that often leaves them locked out when a vendor like Microsoft decides to discontinue certain versions or ask them to pay more.From government migrations to decades-old undiscovered security exploits, Linux is again “hot” in the eyes of mainstream media.
Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) denied on Friday the accuracy of a Wall Street Journal report that alleged its joint venture with Chinese companies gave the latter country access to advanced processor technology that could have military applications, saying that it did “everything correctly and transparently” and did not violate U.S. law.The Journal report cited officials as stating that AMD’s Tianjin Haiguang Advanced Technology Investment Co. Ltd. (THATIC) partnerships, which involved “a leading Chinese supercomputer developer, a state-backed military supplier called Sugon Information Industry Co.,” gave China access to “state-of-the-art x86 chips” only produced by AMD and Intel.The report stated that AMD made nearly $300 million (£236 million) in licensing fees and royalties from the project, while Pentagon officials concerned about its potential military ramifications tried to shut it down.According to the Journal, current and former national security officials also said they believed AMD created a “complex structure, which involved the creation of two interlinked joint ventures, to sidestep U.S. regulations” and avoid oversight by organisations including the Treasury Department-led Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS).AMD controls the first joint venture, which licenses the U.S. chip maker’s x86 intellectual property and manages production of the chips.The Journal wrote that concern about the joint venture included a supposed risk of compromising the x86 IP or fuelling the Chinese supercomputing industry, as well as that Sugon and its affiliates had military ties.
Republican Senator Marco Rubio is seeking to revoke the intellectual property (IP) rights of companies on government watch lists, just days after Chinese telecom giant Huawei asked for more than $1 billion from American telecoms operator Verizon over licensing fees.The Senator submitted an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act, a series of laws that guides American military expenditures.The amendment does not name Huawei or any other company, but proposes that foreign firms on certain priority lists be barred from pursuing legal action, filing complaints to the US Trade Commission, or receiving reparations for their US patents.One includes companies from countries that the US Trade Department sees as failing to provide adequate IP protection for American companies, such as China.The second includes the telecom and internet providers which “pose an unacceptable risk” to US national security under the executive order signed in May by American President Donald Trump, which banned Huawei from trading with US companies.In short, if a company poses a national security risk or is from a country that doesn’t respect property rights, according to the US government, it will not be granted patent rights in the US.
Huawei is seeking over $1 billion from US telecoms giant Verizon relating to over 230 patents.The beleaguered Chinese vendor claims Verizon owes the cash in licensing fees.A Huawei intellectual property executive wrote Verizon should pay up to “solve the patent licensing issue".Patents in question range from core network technologies, IoT, and wireline infrastructure.US operators have claimed Huawei has infringed on their own intellectual property in the past.T-Mobile, for example, claimed Huawei stole its 'Tappy' technology for testing devices.
Huawei wants more than $1 billion in patent licensing fees from Verizon, according to a report.The fees are for the use of over 230 networking-gear patents, Reuters said Wednesday, citing a source.Verizon is reportedly using equipment through other companies that relies on Huawei patents covering core networking gear, internet of things technology and wireline infrastructure.Verizon and Huawei representatives met last week in New York to talk about whether the gear could infringe on Huawei patents, Reuters said."These issues are larger than just Verizon," a Verizon spokesman told Reuters."Given the broader geopolitical context, any issue involving Huawei has implications for our entire industry and also raises national and international concerns."
(Reuters) – Huawei has told Verizon that the U.S. carrier should pay licensing fees for more than 230 of the Chinese telecoms equipment maker’s patents and in aggregate is seeking more than $1 billion, a person briefed on the matter said on Wednesday.Verizon should pay to “solve the patent licensing issue,” a Huawei intellectual property licensing executive wrote in February, the Wall Street Journal reported earlier.The patents cover network equipment for more than 20 of the company’s vendors including major U.S. tech firms but those vendors would indemnify Verizon, the person said.The patents in question range from core network equipment, wireline infrastructure to internet-of-things technology, the Journal reported.Huawei has been battling the U.S. government for more than a year.National security experts worry that “back doors” in routers, switches and other Huawei equipment could allow China to spy on U.S. communications.
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