Photo credit: Getty ImagesFitbits are marketed as devices that can help track things such as your heart rate to better improve your lifestyle, but a new study shows that maybe they re not as accurate as some would lead you to believe.The results of a study conducted by researchers at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, in which participants heart rates were simultaneously measured by a Fitbit on each wrist and a device hooked up to a electrocardiogram, found that the PurePulse heart rate monitors on two Fitbit models - the Surge and Charge HR - can be off by up to 20 beats per minute.Forty three adults were put through differing levels of activity throughout a 65-minute session, from jogging to jump-roping to full-out treadmill running.The PurePulse Trackers do not accurately measure a user s heart rate, particularly during moderate to high intensity exercise, and cannot be used to provide a meaningful estimate of a user s heart rate, the researchers wrote.The study was used in an amended complaint in a class action lawsuit filed against the company by several Fitbit customers who claimed that some trackers didn t accurately measure heart rates during exercise.WTHR, a news station in Indiana, manually recorded things such as steps taken and calories burned and found similar results when compared to the Fitbits participants were wearing.
Fitbits are marketed as devices that can help track things such as your heart rate to better improve your lifestyle, but a new study shows that maybe they re not as accurate as some would lead you to believe.The results of a study conducted by researchers at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, in which participants heart rates were simultaneously measured by a Fitbit on each wrist and a device hooked up to a electrocardiogram, found that the PurePulse heart rate monitors on two Fitbit models - the Surge and Charge HR - can be off by up to 20 beats per minute.Forty three adults were put through differing levels of activity throughout a 65-minute session, from jogging to jump-roping to full-out treadmill running.The PurePulse Trackers do not accurately measure a user s heart rate, particularly during moderate to high intensity exercise, and cannot be used to provide a meaningful estimate of a user s heart rate, the researchers wrote.The study was used in an amended complaint in a class action lawsuit filed against the company by several Fitbit customers who claimed that some trackers didn t accurately measure heart rates during exercise.WTHR, a news station in Indiana, manually recorded things such as steps taken and calories burned and found similar results when compared to the Fitbits participants were wearing.
Fitbit fitness trackers failed to measure accurate heart rates during exerciseThe heart rates measured by Fitbit fitness trackers bear "extremely weak correlation" with that of echocardiogram ECG readings and show a difference of 25 beats per minute bpm .According to a new study conducted by researchers at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, heart rates measured by Fitbit are "highly inaccurate during elevated physical activity".The research report states, "Based on our analysis of those readings, we conclude that the Fitbit PurePulse Trackers do not provide a valid measure of the users' heart rate and cannot be used to provide a meaningful estimate of a user's heart rate, particularly during moderate to high intensity exercise."A total of 43 people were tested, including 22 males and 21 females, for 65 minutes to get the heart rate readings during a variety of activities using Fitbit such as jogging, jumping rope and plyometrics.The data shared by California State Polytechnic University corresponds with the data reported by researchers at Bell State University, which conducted an independent study.This study has also been included in the class action case filed earlier in 2016.
Relying on Fitbit s heart rate monitoring technology could put users in harm s way, according to a scientist at the centre of a lawsuit against the wearable firm.The assistant professor of Applied Physiology at California State Polytechnic University told Wareable inaccuracies discovered by his study poses dangers to users of the Fitbit Charge HR, Fitbit Surge and Fitbit Blaze.Related: Fitbit Blaze reviewThe independent validation study found that the accuracy of Fitbit s tech is off by a whopping 20 beats per minute during moderate to high-intensity exercise.Fitbit has contested the results of the study, which was based on 43 healthy adults, calling it a baseless test designed to extract a payout.In turn Dr. Jo claimed there was little incentive for he and his colleagues to damage their reputation by producing a flawed study.comments powered by Disqus
Indonesia is considering a new bill that will require all rapists and child sex offenders to be implanted with RFID chips to track them after they leave prison for the rest of their livesThe Indonesian government is keen to enforce a new law that will require all rapists and child sex offenders to be implanted with radio frequency identification RFID microchips that will track them 24 hours a day, seven days a week for the rest of their lives after they are released from prison.Minister of Research, Technology and Higher Education Mohamad Nasir told Indonesian TV channel Berita Satu that the government is interested in using RFID microchips to track offenders, but it is still waiting for the House of Representatives to vote on bringing into law a new Regulation on Sexual Violence against Children.The new bill will make sexual violence against children punishable by 20 years in prison, and convicts will be required either to be tracked by RFID or submit to chemical castration.Nasir added that the RFID chips would ideally need to be bulk produced locally in Indonesia, and to that end, the government has been in talks with Politeknik Negeri Batam Batam Polytechnic , which has a laboratory that manufactures microchips.The horrific case rocked the country and although local media initially did not publicise the case at all, public outage led to a viral Twitter campaign Nyala untuk Yuyun Candles for Yuyun with more than 23,000 retweets, and activists galvanised the public to join protests held outside the presidential palace in Jakarta on 4 May.Sexual violence is an emergency issue in Indonesia, but most people don't care about it.
The knife was made with iron that came from a meteorite, according to an article in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science published online last month.The first knife has a blade of gold, while the iron dagger has a gold handle, rock crystal pommel and jackal-decorated sheath.The iron knife has puzzled researchers for 91 years, partially because ironwork was rare in ancient Egypt.Despite being more than 3,300 years old, the iron dagger shows no signs of rust, according to The Guardian.http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/Researchers from Milan Polytechnic, Pisa University, and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo studied the metal makeup of the iron knife using non-invasive, portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.The nickel and cobalt ratio in the dagger blade is consistent with that of iron meteorites that have preserved the primitive chondritic ratio during planetary differentiation in the early solar system.
Using a hi-tech X-ray, the Polytechnic University of Milan in Italy found the famous dagger contained 10 percent nickel and 0.6 percent cobalt.and was found in the wrapping surrounding the right thigh of King Tut s mummy.It features a decorated gold handle with a rounded knob of rock crystal.It was encased in a gold sheath that was decorated with a pattern of lilies, feathers and a jackal s head.Iron objects were rare and considered more valuable than gold during the Bronze Age and were mostly decorative.The use of a portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometry to identify its elements now confirms the theory.
Tutankhamun, the ancient Egyptian boy-king better known as King Tut, was a pretty cool kid.While most 9-year-olds these days are still trudging through grade school, Tut was beginning his rule of ancient Egypt.After 10 years of being a pharaoh, Tut died at the ripe age of 19 — and then allegedly exploded in his own sarcophagus due to a botched mummification.And now a new study published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science shows the boy-king may even have wielded a cosmic dagger during his rule.The knife in question, which scientists believe is made of iron from meteorites, was found in King Tut s tomb nearly a century ago.The finding solves a longstanding debate among scholars about the origin of the dagger, the University of Pisa said in a press release.The researchers used X-rays to analyze the chemical signatures of the knife and found that it has high percentages of nickel, as well as traces of cobalt, phosphorous, and other materials that together suggest the knife s origins are extraterrestrial, Gizmodo reports.The chemical makeup of the dagger points to one meteorite in particular, named Kharga.In 2000, fragments of this meteorite were found on a limestone plateau about 150 miles west of Alexandria."Kharga turned out to have nickel and cobalt contents which are possibly consistent with the composition of the blade," lead author Daniela Comelli, at the department of Physics of Milan Polytechnic, told Discovery News.According to the study, this isn't the only case of Egyptian artifacts from this time period 4,000 B.C.to 3,000 B.C.being made from the iron of meteorites.This new finding suggests that this space iron had a lot of value in ancient Egypt, and looking at the craftsmanship at the blade they were pretty good at working it, the press release said.Another interesting item buried in King Tut s tomb is a scarab necklace, which scientists believe is made of the glass produced when a meteorite smacks into the desert and melts the surrounding sand.The ancient space dagger is currently on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.NOW WATCH: Scientists hope to find hidden tombs by scanning the Egyptian pyramids with cosmic rays Loading video...
A team accompanied by Egypt's former antiquities minister and famed archaeologist Zahi Hawass are testing a new scanner on the Great Pyramid of Giza, hoping that modern technology could help unlock ancient secrets buried deep beneath the stone.He has been appointed by the Antiquities Ministry to head the team that will review the scan results.Late last year, thermal scanning identified a major anomaly in the pyramid — three adjacent stones at its base which registered higher temperatures than others.Hawass has in the past downplayed the usefulness of scans on ancient sites, saying that they have never found anything important."I hope these scans will help us obtain accurate information," he said, adding that he believed another burial chamber remains undiscovered inside.Last month, researchers led by Daniela Comelli of the Polytechnic University of Milan published a paper on a rare iron dagger found inside the boy king's sarcophagus.
Fewer legal hoops need to be jumped through to obtain citizens' metadata: it's considered basic information.As a group of top researchers argue in a new draft paper PDF , the distinction between private content which has some degree of privacy safeguards and metadata describing that content needs to be redefined:Our final conclusion is simple.In the paper, the authors point out that concepts such as non-content distinctions what exactly is metadata, for example were designed for pre-internet mediums such as phone calls, and cannot translate to internet services.Today's online services run through so many third parties without a user's explicit consent, there's almost always a third party involved, thus weakening one's privacy protections."What is clear is that rules so deeply rooted in the technology of the 20th century phone system are going to yield increasingly unsatisfying results and become less and less useful going forward."The paper, It's Too Complicated: the Technological Implications of IP-based Communications on Content/Non-content Distinctions and the Third Party Doctrine, was written by Steven Bellovin professor of computer science, Columbia University , Matt Blaze associate professor of computer information science, University of Pennsylvania , Susan Landau professor of cybersecurity policy, Worcester Polytechnic Institute , and Stephanie K Pell assistant professor and cyber ethics fellow at West Point's Army Cyber Institute .
For want of an atom, the space elevator failedCarbon nanotubes CNTs are famed for being a future wonder material that will enable a swathe of super-strong but light applications from racing bikes to computer components.That means one of the more outlandish applications for CNT fibres – a sci-fi space elevator – might never happen.Theoretical studies suggest that a single CNT can have a tensile strength of 100 gigapascals GPa , making it one of the strongest materials around, but efforts to spin multiple nanotubes into a practical large-scale fibre have only produced ropes with strengths of 1 GPa.To find out why, Feng Ding of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and his colleagues simulated CNTs with a single atom is out of place, turning two of the hexagons into a pentagon and heptagon, and creating a kink in the tube.Fracture sequenceThe team s simulations show that the kink acts as a weak point in the tube, easily snapping the normally strong carbon-carbon bonds.The results suggest just one misplaced atom is enough to weaken an entire CNT fibre, and since nanotube manufacturing processes are flawed at the moment, you will inevitably end up with a bad tube in your fibre.
A conceptual image of a space elevator Credit: Obayashi Corporation Carbon nanotubes have been pegged as the wonder material that could finally allow us to build a space elevator.A discouraging new study suggests these microscopic strands aren t as resilient as we thought—and all it could take is a single misplaced atom to bring the whole thing crashing down.As reported in New Scientist, Feng Ding of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University wanted to find out why, so he and his colleagues simulated CNTs with a single atom out of place.New Scientist explains:The team s simulations show that the kink acts as a weak point in the tube, easily snapping the normally strong carbon-carbon bonds.This is definitely a setback in the effort to design and build a space elevator, which will require cables with tensile strengths reaching 50 GPa.If these skylifts are ever going to happen, engineers are going to have to figure out a way to make CNTs perfect at the atomic level—and that s a daunting proposition.
Detail Hips cheese can reduce the amount of food thrown. X-ray analyzes of food can provide better knowledge of its structure and make its manufacture more accurate, according to the researchers at the University of Copenhagen. Super absorbent nanomaterial. For example, you can of Mashable read more about the new Xbox Project Scorpio promising games in 4k and virtual reality. International Business Times presents a list of gadgets that are komptatibla with new iOS and the Huffington Post Tech of the eight coolest iPhone news that Apple just told you about. Carbon nanotubes are the solution to build a space elevator, according to researchers at Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
A discouraging new study suggests these microscopic strands aren t as resilient as we thought — and all it could take is a single misplaced atom to bring the whole thing crashing down.As reported in New Scientist, Feng Ding of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University wanted to find out why, so he and his colleagues simulated CNTs with a single atom out of place.New Scientist explains:The team s simulations show that the kink acts as a weak point in the tube, easily snapping the normally strong carbon-carbon bonds.As Ding said, Most mass-produced CNTs are highly defective, and high-quality CNTs are hard to produce in large quantity.This is definitely a setback in the effort to design and build a space elevator, which will require cables with tensile strengths reaching 50 GPa.If these skylifts are ever going to happen, engineers are going to have to figure out a way to make CNTs perfect at the atomic level — and that s a daunting proposition.
When you picture massive advances in robotics you might not immediately think of a small squishy vehicle which runs on soft wheels to more efficiently travel over rough terrain or make its way underwater.But that s exactly the goal that mechanical engineers at Rutgers University had when they set out to build a cutting-edge, pneumatic wheel and axle assembly that could help make soft-wheeled robots a vital part of future rescue missions or deep space planetary exploration.Upon seeing this work, a friend suggested that we have committed the proverbial reinventing of the wheel, Aaron Mazzeo, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, tells Digital Trends.I am fine with that perspective, as we hope squishy wheels and joints will complement current progress in soft locomotors and actuators.The big advance in the work is the creation of a soft motor capable of providing torque minus any bending or extending of its housing.The introduction of the wheel-on-axle configurations extend the potential functionality of soft robotic systems by providing controllable rotational torque and transporting payload, without requiring bending or twisting, the project s lead author Xiangyu Gong — now a doctoral student at New York s Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute — tells Digital Trends.
Image: Marko Poplasen / ShutterstockToday s the day that we celebrate our independence—and the best way to do that is by lighting-up a sparkler and holding a little bit of fire in your own two hands.But what s in that sparkler that burns so bright?The ingredients of a sparkler are pretty basic.You need some kind of fuel, an oxidizer, either iron or steel powder, a binder, and wire.According to Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, the most common mix is charcoal and sulfur as fuel, potassium nitrate as an oxidizer, and sugar or starch as a binder.
What s in that sparkler that burns so bright?That d be incredibly hot-burning chemicals, mainly.The ingredients of a sparkler are pretty basic.You need some kind of fuel, an oxidiser either iron or steel powder , a binder, and wire.According to Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, the most common mix is charcoal and sulphur as fuel, potassium nitrate as an oxidiser, and sugar or starch as a binder.If these components sound familiar to some of you firebugs out there, yes, they re also the same components in fireworks.
Home Upen Codarica behind Coda app game that allows children to develop their own mobile games. The company is run by founders Sanna Nilsson Lovisa Levin and Marcus Lindstrom. Companies started to Sanna Nilsson and Loviisa Levin read together at the Polytechnic Hyper Island. Our final project was to make an e-book for children about coding. Our first app was a further development of the book, says Lovisa Levin, Marketing Codarica. The two started the company together with Marcus Lindstrom and Rosalynn button.
SINGAPORE — The lack of Pokémon Go in Asia save for Indonesia is driving people mad, including one very talented Singaporean student.While trainer-wannabes continue to wait for the augmented reality game to drop in their respective countries, 19-year-old Nurul Syafiqa decided to feed her Pokémon Go obsession by playing a game of pretend on Snapchat.On July 11, Nurul tweeted screen caps from her Snapchat account featuring drawings of Pikachu, Squirtle and Rayquaza around her home.These drawings come complete with the Poké Ball for capturing Pokémon.Nurul is a student at Nanyang Polytechnic studying food science and nutrition and, according to her Twitter account, she loves drawing comics.Launched in the U.S, Australia and New Zealand in early July, Pokémon Go managed to surpass Tinder in popularity in just a matter of days.
Compounds found in cranberries could be harnessed to develop a new generation of antibiotics that combat antibiotic-resistant superbugs, new research shows.Researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the University of Massachusetts have discovered that traditional wisdom about the fruit s anti-bacterial properties can be proved in lab experiments.The new paper reveals that compounds in cranberry juice called flavonols greatly reduce the ability of the bacteria E.coli to stick to a surface .In its various guises, E.coli is the cause of many different types of infection, including UTIs.The research team, led by WPI s Terri Camesano and UMass Darmouth s Catherine Neto, had previously identified a group of compounds called proanthocyanidins PACs that they believe aided the juice s ability to block bacterial adhesion.A petri dish containing MRSA.
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