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It will come as no surprise to learn that Donald Trump’s Twitter has been a bit of a mess today, but even by the standards of the US president, one part of it was particularly bizarre.Two tweets from the most powerful man in the world were retweets of a clearly faked video of his Democratic rival Joe Biden playing the ’80s classic ‘Fuck tha Police’ by NWA.Trump began his journey of misunderstanding with a gentle query of “what is this all about?”What is this all about? https://t.co/AAmBGgHhyR— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 16, 2020The answer to this question was fairly obvious, especially as Twitter had plastered a large ”Manipulated media” banner across the original tweet.Perennially undeterred by facts, reasons and logic, Trump continued in his quest to promote the fake video, this time by making some rather dubious assumptions about China.China is drooling. They can’t believe this! https://t.co/AAmBGgHhyR— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 16, 2020It’s not clear if Trump thinks China is particularly susceptible to fake videos or if they just love rap music.Of course what the president is actually trying to do is stoke divisions ahead of the upcoming presidential election by fanning false claims that Biden wants to abolish police forces across the US.Trump has to engage in such bizarre antics as he is trailing badly in the polls. Even the magazine Scientific American has broken with 175 years of history by endorsing a presidential candidate, coming down heavily on the side of Democratic challenger Joe Biden.This is about you deliberately putting out an edited video of @JoeBiden because you are losing to him badly. https://t.co/Iz7cScgZYy— Rick Tyler-Still Right (@rickwtyler) September 16, 2020Oh and if you’re wondering, it was actually Despacito, obviously.After being introduced by Luis Fonsi, Joe Biden pulled out his phone and started playing Despacito ahead of his remarks kicking off Hispanic Heritage Month in Kissimmee, FL. pic.twitter.com/7R6hUZgLW1— Sarah Mucha (@sarahmucha) September 16, 2020Related... Trump Interview On Fox News Comes To An Awkward End Trump Doesn't Seem To Know 'What Is Real And What Is Unreal', Bob Woodward Claims
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I had an unpleasant experience with a bunch of teenage girls the other day – but after calling out their bad behaviour online, I found myself accused of “teenager bashing”.My four-year-old son and I had gone to the local park, and he needed the toilet. So far, so normal – except that on hurrying with him to the public loos nearby, we encountered a large group of girls, aged about 14 or 15, hanging out at the entrance. In groups, teens often get a bad rap, and can be unfairly viewed with suspicion. It must be even harder since the pandemic – young people have had nowhere to go or hang out for months. They’ve been without their friends and their usual routines of school and socialising, then had to cope with the GCSE and A-level marking fiasco. In some ways, teens had it worse than anyone in lockdown.I wasn’t worried when I approached the girls in the park – I simply didn’t think about it. After all, I’ve been a teenage girl. I know their bark is worse than their bite, and I didn’t expect them to bark at all – not at a mum with her young child.Sadly, I was wrong.Related... 'Their Story Is An Important One': Lockdown Through The Eyes Of Teenagers I was shocked at being told loudly to “fuck off”, after asking them to please move out of the way, because they were blocking the exit. My little boy was desperate, and the loos, as I discovered, were out of order. We needed to get home – fast. The collective side-eye and sneering was palpable – and so was the abuse. I stopped and asked if they thought they were setting a good example by swearing in front of a young child, imagining most would shift uncomfortably, that some of the six-strong group might have brothers or sisters at home of the same age. I thought they’d apologise.Instead, they laughed and told me fiercely and repeatedly to “shut up”. Don’t get me wrong. I was as stroppy as the next teenager, when I was 15. I remember doing all the usual, horrid things: stomping to my room, slamming the door, shouting “I hate you!”, when of course I didn’t mean it. I once threw the remote control at my dad (sorry, Dad), and got so drunk on cider at my first house party that I threw up all over someone’s mum’s new sofa.Point being: I understand only too well that teenagers aren’t perfect, and nor should they be. In our teenage years we learn to test boundaries – and often, that involves working out what’s acceptable, and what isn’t.Plus, teens are under enormous pressure to be part of the ‘in’ crowd and to belong, something that clinical child psychologist Emma Citron says is more obvious when encountering a “pack”.  Related... 'Their Story Is An Important One': Lockdown Through The Eyes Of Teenagers “You always get difficult characters in any social group of any age,” she tells me. “As soon as you’re in a pack, it’s a bit like a firing squad – there’s less individual culpability, and more bad behaviour.” But Citron says it’s important to remember the unique impact of not being in school for half the year, too. “Kids haven’t been in school for a long time, and school can be a check for rough behaviour,” she says. “Many kids experience people swearing or being mean or critical towards them, at home; and are coming out of a hothouse of frustration and boredom and a lack of direction and misery.”Citron points to studies which show teens have been less stressed and anxious in lockdown, but warns they’re also arguably more frustrated, bored and angry – “a whole different set of emotions”.“If kids are feeling a bit low or bored, then you’re not seeing the best of them,” she says. “If you saw the same kids in their maths class, you’d probably see someone totally different.”After my encounter with this particular group, which genuinely left me shaking, I thought long and hard about what to do next. In the end, because it was in front of my young son, I felt I needed to take action. So, I posted an alert on a local Facebook forum and to ask people to “check in” with their teenagers to ask if they were on the high street that day, and were part of what had happened. I wanted fellow parents like me to talk to their kids to remind them to be kind to strangers – and to each other. There were dozens of comments in response, ranging from sympathetic to rude – but the harshest by far was directed at me. One local mum accused me of “bashing teenagers” to “feel better about myself”, and told me to “look at what I’d started”. “I’d be reluctant to discipline my teenager on the strength of a very ambiguous post,” she added. Being shamed for calling out unacceptable behaviour took me completely by surprise. I immediately regretted posting anything at all, then realised that if it were my child I would want to know, so I could address it. Ignorance serves no-one. Citron tells me that ‘calling out’ antisocial behaviour is a choice – but when it involves a young child, it might also be a duty.“There’s an argument for being the ‘bigger person’ and ignoring it, and that way they don’t get the attention they’re craving,” she says. “But swearing is an aggressive act, and if it’s in front of a small child, you need to role model that it’s not appropriate. It’s all about the child; not you, or them.”But she says we should try to make the messages as positive as possible, because our goal should be improving the fabric of our society. “Teenagers are emerging adults – they need checks on their behaviour, just like the rest of us. They need a wake-up call to know that certain behaviour is not okay, and to consider the effect on a four year old: would it make the child feel anxious and unsafe? Would it make them too scared to use public toilets again?”Citron also says we have a moral duty to call out unacceptable behaviour when we see it, or risk being complicit. “Like any boundaries – with family members, friends – when we see they’re stepping out of line we need to call it out, otherwise we are coercing with it,” she warns. “Racism needs to be called out, as does violence, or we are passive participants in antisocial behaviour.”Related... 14 Of The Best Responses To The Teen Bullied For His Love Of Books Of course, it’s easy to be dragged into ‘tit for tat’ arguments, online - something grown-ups are guilty of, as much as teens. I’ve witnessed bullying and name-calling on my primary school parents’ WhatsApp group, and have found myself drawn into virtual rows I wish I’d never been involved with.Maybe I was wrong, to recount my experience on social media. Maybe I was also wrong for talking back to the teenage girls when it happened, and for telling them they should think about what they were saying in front of a little boy, and for asking them to please move aside and create more space. Maybe I wasn’t as laidback or understanding as I could have been. I was in a rush, but that’s no excuse. Perhaps I should have dealt with it differently. But even as I accept the possibility that I didn’t handle it ideally, I still don’t think shaming is the right answer. Because we could all learn a lot from being kinder to one another – and that goes for teenagers and grown-ups. Related... Opinion: School Children Need A Mental Health Catch-Up – Not Just An Academic One How Young Londoners Really Feel About Plans To Scrap Their Free Travel I Took One Of My Kids On A 'Love Bombing' Trip. Here's Why.
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Kayne West quotes, "We culture.Rap is the new rock n’ roll.We the rock stars.” True that rap has taken over every other genre of music.The youth and at times the adults, 'young adults' to be precise have been in love with rap music or say Hip-Hop.To make some best of the hop genre, the artists need excellent and the best rap beats.
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Latest Asphalt Market Report published by Value Market Research, it provides a comprehensive market analysis which includes market size, share, value, growth, trends during forecast period 2020-2026 along with strategic development of the key player with their market share.Further, the market has been bifurcated into sub-segments with regional and country market with in-depth analysis.The research report also covers the comprehensive profiles of the key players in the market and an in-depth view of the competitive landscape worldwide.The major players in the asphalt market include Aggregate Industries Ltd., Anglo American Plc, Atlas Roofing Corporation, BP Plc, Cemex, Chevron Corporation, Exxon Mobil Corporation, Imperial Oil Limited, Owens Corning, Petroleos de Venezuela S.A, Royal Dutch Shell plc, Shell International, Total SA, United Refining Inc. and others.This section includes a holistic view of the competitive landscape that includes various strategic developments such as key mergers& acquisitions, future capacities, partnerships, financial overviews, collaborations, new product developments, new product launches, and other developments.Get more information on "Global Asphalt Market Research Report" by requesting FREE Sample Copy at https://www.valuemarketresearch.com/contact/asphalt-market/download-sampleMarket DynamicsRapid urbanization across the globe is one of the key factors driving the growth of the market.Furthermore, asphalt serves as a more cost-effective and durable alternative to the conventionally used concrete in the construction industry.Moreover, the increasing usage of reclaimed asphalt pavements (RAP) in residential and commercial driveways, parking lots, and schools and playground blacktops are catalyzing the market growth.Additionally, increasing demand from the industrial sector for low-slope roofing products such as modified bitumen membranes, mopping asphalts and roll roofing is driving the growth of the market further.
...read the article, of course North Korean government hackers dubbed the BeagleBoyz are trying to electronically rob banks, the United States warned this week.…
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50 Cent Net Worth is gained through his success in rapping and that too with his debut album, Get Rich or Die Trying.It became one of the best rap albums that the world has ever known. 
In one instance, Owens lifted 148 words almost verbatim from Wikipedia on the definition of "gangsta rap."
In April, Stream co-founders Lan Paje, Paul Klein, and Jun Ho Hong spent a sleepless weekend hacking away at their startup idea, a Patreon alternative.  The founders applied to Y Combinator and were accepted but turned it down and instead fundraised from angel investors and boutique, early-stage VC firms. Here's how the startup raised $2.1 million in one month from rising stars in the VC/startup world. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. As COVID-19 upended life in the US, Stream CEO Lan Paje thought it might be a good idea to build a Patreon alternative for content creators stuck at home during lockdown. In April, he invited his two friends Paul Klein and Jun Ho Hong, to spend a sleepless weekend "hacking" away at his new idea, Klein told Business Insider. By the end of the weekend, the trio had gotten their initial prototype off the ground and were hosting their startup's first event.  "The first event on Stream was actually us reading bedtime stories to our friends," Klein said, acknowledging his surprise that they got the project up and running so quickly. Similar to platforms like Patreon and Jemi, Stream helps creators manage livestreams and recorded classes. The startup already has thousands of creators from across the US offering live and recorded classes, including the California Symphony, yoga instructors, basketball coaches, and professional knitters, Klein said. Right now, users pay $10-$20 to participate in virtual classes of 10-15 people, although Stream plans to add a membership fee down the road.  Their prototype landed the trio a spot in the Y Combinator startup accelerator summer 2020 class, but they turned that offer down.  Instead, the founders "took advantage of the remote work culture," Klein said, and started meeting with as many investors as possible, raising $2.1 million in what's known these days as "a pre-seed" round, doing the fundraising entirely over Zoom last May. "There's so much venture money right now for early-stage startups," Klein explained, referring to angel investors and boutique early-stage venture firms.  Klein says the secret to such fast success was using On Deck, a platform and fellowship program that connects entrepreneurs with VCs from a wide number of firms, including Founders Fund, Sequoia, and Greylock Partners.  On Deck is where the Stream team met VC Erik Torenberg, whose early-stage firm Village Global became one of the startup's first institutional investors. In an email to Business Insider, Torenberg said his firm decided to invest in Stream because the startup "is taking advantage of a monumental shift from live events to virtual and the broader trend of more and more people becoming independent creators."  Torenberg said Stream stood out to him because it's tackling a "massive, growing market" while still placing a great deal of emphasis on building a robust "product & engineering team."  The founding trio, who have worked at startups backed by firms like Founders Fund, Bessemer, and Andreessen Horowitz, also convinced their former bosses to chip in to the pre-seed round, including rising stars in the startup world like Omni COO Ryan Delk and DoNotPay CEO Joshua Browder. These investments reflect the larger trend of CEOs investing in their former employees.  Stream hasn't focused on marketing, so it's growth has been entirely organic, Paje said, and he attributes the early signs of success to an intense focus on its target customers. "All of us talk to our customers every day," Paje said, adding that the startup sees itself as "partnering with our creators." The startup's first full-time hire was a customer success manager.  Klein added that, because of the recent startup layoffs, cancelled summer internships, and the shift to remote work, the time for recruiting top software engineering talent has never been better. The co-founder said the team's three remote summer interns have been instrumental in the startup's early success.  With the influx of cash, the startup is hiring for roles in product design, software engineering, and growth marketing. While they plan to build a distributed team, the founders said they are also taking advantage of cheap short-term rental prices and have been living together in Airbnb rentals for a month at a time in cities across the US, most recently in Portland. Now read: This YC-backed power couple launched a Patreon alternative for creators that's helped a horror movie actor boost his earnings by 30% during lockdown SEE ALSO: A former Apple TV designer built a livestreaming startup to challenge Twitch, and he's betting the key to winning will be live rap battles Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: The rise and fall of Donald Trump's $365 million airline
"He was not a mastermind. He was a small guy in stature and was a small-time con artist who had a good acid rap for a while."
Power couple Annie Hwang and Jason Cui built Jemi, a Patreon alternative that landed them a coveted spot in Y Combinator's Summer 2020 batch. Jemi helps creator entrepreneurs to sell merchandise and experiences, such as autographed pictures, 1-on-1 virtual hang outs, and acting classes. So far, they've brought on ex-Guns N' Roses lead guitarist Bumblefoot, Olympic figure skater Karen Chen, and actor Sean Whalen, who is best known for his roles in the horror film 'The People Under the Stairs' and the 1996 thriller 'Twister'. Business Insider spoke with Whalen about why he choose Jemi over alternatives like Patreon.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Annie Hwang and Jason Cui met on the first day of college at Harvard, where they later started dating. After graduating in 2018, they worked as product managers and launched their tech careers. After the coronavirus pandemic struck, the power couple started brainstorming new ways to get audience members to interact with, and pay, content creators that use live streaming platforms like TikTok. In April, they launched the private beta version of Jemi, a Patreon alternative that landed the couple a coveted spot in Y Combinator's Summer 2020 batch. "We want to build this next generation of creator entrepreneurs," Hwang told Business Insider in an interview.  The country's ongoing shelter-in-place orders means that many actors, comedians, and musicians are unemployed and turning to live streaming, she explained. Creators "deserve to be monetizing their time and individuality," Hwang added, noting that "not all creators are making money." Jemi allows creator entrepreneurs to offer merchandise and experiences, such as autographed pictures, 1-on-1 virtual hangouts, and acting classes. The startup takes a cut from each transaction, Cui explained, though he didn't reveal specifics.  When Jemi launched in April, Hwang started reaching out to creators. So far, Jemi has brought on ex-Guns N' Roses lead guitarist Bumblefoot, Olympic figure skater Karen Chen, and actor Sean Whalen, who is best known for his role in the films 'The People Under the Stairs' and 'Twister'.  "We're not going after the typical celebrities," Hwang said. "They see themselves as content creators." Whalen, who most recently appeared in the 2020 film 'American Pickle' starring Seth Rogen, told Business Insider in an interview that, before he discovered Jemi, he'd been looking for new ways to make money from his TikTok live streams, where many of his 100,000+ followers tune in weekly. Whalen said that Jemi has been helping him make extra cash, as "there's no production going on" in the film industry.  "I gave Patreon a try," he said, "but my followers weren't into the subscription model." Die-hard horror fans from the Midwest Many of his followers, Whalen explained, are die-hard horror fans that come from rural parts of the Midwest. "They know me as Roach from The People Under the Stairs or from Twister," he said. The actor's name also got a boost from Netflix, which added Twister to the streaming platform at the beginning of June (before removing the film 2 months later). Whalen, who sells merchandise like autographed photos, DVDs, and Blurays, said he also tried including links to his PayPal and Venmo accounts on his TikTok live streams. But many of his fans would tell him "I don't have Venmo! I don't have PayPal," the actor said, explaining that the payment platforms aren't as popular among fans in rural areas.  Jemi made the process simple: Followers make one-time purchases by inputting their shipping and credit card information, all in one place. "Almost everyone has a credit or debit card," the actor said of his fanbase.   Since switching from Venmo and PayPal to Jemi, Whalen says his sales have increased by more than 30%. On his Friday TikTok live streams, his busiest days, he said that he sells about 40-50 items in 2 hours, and that Jemi makes it easier to manage the influx of requests.  There have been some hiccups, Whalen admitted, but he also said that the young entrepreneurs who founded the company "are willing to learn, and there's no ego around that."SEE ALSO: A former Apple TV designer built a livestreaming startup to challenge Twitch, and he's betting the key to winning will be live rap battles Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's what it's like to travel during the coronavirus outbreak
TikTok has transformed the music industry in recent months as tracks that go viral on the app have taken over the Billboard 100 and Spotify Viral 50 charts. TikTok's music-friendly interface and its users' penchant for dance challenges have made it an indispensable promotional tool for the music industry. Business Insider compiled a power list of the 24 music marketers, artists, digital creators, record labels, and other industry insiders who are using TikTok to help define popular music in 2020. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. On January 13, the marketing team at Sony Music Entertainment noticed that one of its artist's songs was surging on TikTok.  Like most record labels, the company had been monitoring activity on TikTok for months as the short-form video app had emerged as a major driver of song streams on platforms like Spotify, Apple Music, and YouTube. Sony had seen Doja Cat, who signed with its RCA Records imprint in 2014, blow up on the app in December after 17-year-old TikTok star Haley Sharpe created a popular dance to her song "Say So" (a dance that Doja Cat ultimately ended up using in her music video). But this time, it was one of the label's older catalog songs, a Matthew Wilder track from 1983 called "Break My Stride," that had caught the fancy of TikTok's largely Gen-Z user base. "Our entire music catalog is effectively tracked on a daily basis," said Andy McGrath, the senior vice president of marketing at Legacy Recordings, the division within Sony that manages Wilder's song catalog. "We're constantly monitoring actions, reactions, and trends that happen on TikTok. We watch what's happening and how many people are creating their own challenges and sharing existing challenges, et cetera, and then we start to say, 'Okay something's happening here.'" For large music conglomerates like Sony and independent labels alike, TikTok has become an essential marketing tool. Songs can rise on TikTok by accident, as was the case with Wilder's "Break My Stride." In other instances, marketers or artists try to make songs take off by tapping into existing TikTok fads, creating original songs, or adapting tracks for TikTok's short-video format and hiring influencers to promote them. "Every music label, every record label, they have a budget now for TikTok because it's becoming so huge," Ariell Nicholas Yahid, a talent manager at the TikTok-focused talent-management upstart the Fuel Injector, told Business Insider.  In addition to helping artists and labels launch new tracks, song promotion has become an important source of revenue for TikTok's top creators who are looking for ways to make money on an app that still has limited monetization features. And for up-and-coming artists, TikTok can offer an effective way to build an audience quickly. You can see that clearly in the seemingly instantaneous music careers of TikTok stars like Dixie D'Amelio, Jaden Hossler, and Josh Richards. Artists like Abigail Barlow and the group Avenue Beat have also used TikTok to test out new tracks before releasing them on streaming platforms. Avenue Beat's recent smash hit, "F2020," blew up on TikTok first before the group committed to recording a full version of the song in July. It's since landed on Apple iTunes' top 50 chart for pop songs. "We hadn't finished writing the song, we'd literally just written a verse and chorus," Avenue Beat's Savana Santos said. "We just threw it up on TikTok, not thinking that anything was going to happen because we'd never had a video really take off before. We went to bed and we woke up and the next day it had 4.5 million views." TikTok isn't the first social-media platform to leave its mark on the music industry. YouTube has long been a key promotional tool for record labels and artists alike (Justin Bieber was a YouTuber before he became a pop star). And artists have recently used other social platforms like Instagram and Twitch to perform shows remotely for fans as live performances have come to a halt during the coronavirus pandemic.   But music is at the core of the TikTok experience. The short-form video platform's song-friendly interface (adding a "sound" is part of each user's video upload process) harkens back to the app's roots as the dancing and lip-syncing app Musical.ly, which TikTok's parent company ByteDance acquired and merged with TikTok in 2018. Some of TikTok's biggest stars are dancers who can spark the creation of millions of user-generated videos and streams of a new song by posting a single dance video. And TikTok's content recommendation page (the "For You" page) serves up an algorithmically determined assortment of posts that can make any song go viral, whether a track is being used in a paid promotion by a top influencer or in an original dance routine conceived by a non-famous teenager. One need look no further than the Billboard 100 or Spotify Viral 50 to see the app's imprint on popular music in recent months. To understand the power players driving music on TikTok forward, Business Insider compiled a list of the music marketers, artists, digital creators, record labels, and other industry insiders who are using TikTok to define popular music in 2020. The list was determined by Business Insider based on our reporting and the nominations that we received. We took into consideration how a company or individual has used TikTok to grow an artist's, song's, or label's prominence in the industry. Here are the 24 music industry players that are using TikTok to reshape popular music in 2020 (listed in alphabetical order):300 Entertainment Rayna Bass (SVP of marketing) 300 Entertainment is a US independent music label headquartered in New York.  The company works with a variety of artists who have taken off on TikTok in recent months, including Young Thug, whose song "Relationship (feat. Future)" appeared in over 35 million user-generated videos on the app. The label also represents Megan Thee Stallion, whose song "Savage" sparked one of the app's most viral dance challenges. After being promoted to SVP of marketing at 300 in January 2019, Rayna Bass has helped the label's artists grow and adapt to a changing consumer environment driven in part by song and dance trends on TikTok. Before joining 300 Entertainment, Bass held roles at Island Def Jam Music Group and Clear Channel Radio. Bass was one of Billboard's picks for its Women In Music Top Executives list for 2019. 740 Project Charley Greenberg (managing partner) 740 Project is a music marketing firm and record label that was cofounded by Charley Greenberg, Rahim Wright, and Jesse Edwards in 2015.  Greenberg serves as a managing partner at 740 and also works on the company's independent label Blac Noize!  The label's first signing, the artist Tokyo's Revenge, blew up on TikTok this year as two of its songs, "GOODMORNINGTOKYO!" and "THOT!" went viral on the app, appearing in hundreds of thousands of user-generated posts and dance videos from popular creators like Charli D'Amelio and Loren Gray. Greenberg also helped promote DeathbyRomy's single "Problems" on TikTok. ATG Media Omid Noori (cofounder) and Ramzi Najdawi (cofounder) Founded in 2018, The ATG Group, formerly known as Noori Marketing, is a marketing agency and artist management company founded by Omid Noori and Ramzi Najdawi. The company's marketing division, ATG Media, specializes in digital and influencer marketing. ATG told Business Insider that it has worked on a variety of high-profile influencer marketing campaigns on TikTok to promote songs like BMW Kenny's "Wipe It Down," Dua Lipa's "Don't Start Now," MASN's "Psycho!," Ashnikko's "STUPID (feat. Yung Baby Tate)," and Saweetie's "Tap In," which have collectively appeared in over 10 million user-generated videos on the app.   Noori told Business Insider that a lot of ATG's successful TikTok music marketing campaigns have come from identifying existing user trends and amplifying them through paid promotions with influencers rather than inventing something new. "We double down on what's working," he said. "We find content that's organically connecting, or that we shed a little bit of light on it, and we see it come to fruition."   AWAL Michael Pukownik (head of artist marketing) AWAL is an independent record label formed by the publishing company Kobalt Music Group and based in London, UK. The company provides artists with services like marketing and distribution while letting them keep full ownership of their copyrights. AWAL artists' songs are available on TikTok through a deal with the digital rights agency Merlin. Over the past two years at AWAL, Pukownik has built an artist marketing team responsible for driving discovery, audience development, marketing strategy, and release execution for the company's roster of artists.  Under Pukownik's tenure, AWAL artists have built large followings on TikTok, driving millions of video views and streaming platform plays for artists like Alaina Castillo, Lauv, Yung Bans, girl in red, and Gus Dapperton (who collaborated with Benee for one of TikTok's most popular tracks, Supalonely). Before joining AWAL, Pukownik worked in marketing roles at Warner Bros. Records, Capitol Records, and EMI Music.   BAS.media Danny Kang (founder) BAS.media is a group of viral-content marketers that has an exclusive partnership with Columbia Records to promote artists and tracks on TikTok and other social-media platforms.  The company manages song promotion rights for influential TikTok sound accounts like Rapidsongs (8.4 million followers) and Goalsounds (5.6 million followers), whose track remixes have been used in millions of videos on the app. Collab Eric Jacks (chief strategy officer) Collab is a digital talent network and entertainment studio that works with TikTok music creators like Spencer X, Jon Klaasen, Scotty Sire, and Baby Ariel, who collectively have over 90 million followers on the app. The company was started by a brother trio of former creators (James, Tyler, and Will McFadden) and former Fullscreen Executive Soung Kang, to provide software, sales, and services to independent creators.  As Collab's chief strategy officer, Eric Jacks has helped Collab navigate partnerships with record labels, handle in-app music promotions, and work with TikTok-first music producers and artists.  The company has worked on music promotions for artists like Juicy J, Blink-182, Megan Thee Stallion, Dua Lipa, and Lauren Jauregui. Collab also worked with music producers and writers to create an original song "Bright Idea" for a Bliss Cosmetics TikTok campaign earlier this year.  Creed Media Timothy Collins (COO and cofounder), Madelaine 'Mimmi' Zetterström (head of campaign operations), Marisa Pilchmair (music campaigns), Alex Falck (music campaigns)  Founded in 2018 by Timothy Collins, Hugo Leprince, and Eliot Robinson, Creed Media is a music marketing agency based in Stockholm, Sweden. The team has worked with record labels and influencers to promote tracks on TikTok like Trevor Daniel's "Falling," Surf Mesa's "ILY," Camila Cabello's "My Oh My," Topic's "Breaking Me," and S1MBA's "Rover," according to the company. "We have a production team in-house actually, with music producers that help us TikTok-optimize certain songs," Collins said. "We work with creators as well as with our in-house team to come up with good skits or POV concepts or dance choreographies that we believe will resonate on the platform." Collins previously headed up digital strategies at the music management firm At Night Management, which worked with Swedish artists like Avicii, Axwell ^ Ingrosso, and Otto Knows. Zetterström oversees the company's day-to-day campaign operations. Falk leads client relationships for campaigns in the US. And Pilchmair works on campaigns for priority projects in Europe and the United States.   Def Jam J.D. Tuminski (VP, digital marketing) Tuminski runs digital strategy and marketing at Def Jam, working on artist promotions on TikTok and other social-media platforms.   He led the label's campaign for Justin Bieber's 2020 album Changes. One of Bieber's tracks on the album, "Yummy," has appeared in over four million videos on TikTok. Tuminski has also worked on promoting artists like Jhené Aiko, Kaash Paige, 2 Chainz, Alessia Cara, 070 Shake, and Fredo Bang on social media. This year, he's led efforts to engage fans during quarantine with digital events like a virtual reality performance by DaniLeigh. Before joining Def Jam, Tuminski worked in digital marketing at Columbia Records and in corporate communications at HBO. Doja Cat Doja Cat (Amala Ratna Zandile Dlamini) (music artist) While Doja Cat has sparked controversy, her imprint on the music and dance culture of TikTok is undeniable. The artist has 4.7 million TikTok fans, and millions of the app's users have posted videos of themselves dancing to Doja Cat songs like "Say So" and "Boss Bitch." The artist's embrace of TikTok has extended well beyond posting videos on the app. After 17-year-old TikToker Haley Sharpe posted a viral dance to her single "Say So," Doja Cat incorporated the dance in her official music video for the track with a cameo appearance from Sharpe. And Doja Cat recently made a guest appearance during The Weeknd's live concert series on TikTok on August 7. With song after song going viral on the app, Pitchfork described Doja Cat's reign on TikTok as "unimpeachable." Flighthouse Jacob Pace (CEO), Ash Stahl (general manager), Amy Hart (music marketing), Adi Azran (music marketing) In addition to running its own popular TikTok account with about 26 million followers, Flighthouse, which is owned by the music-technology company Create Music Group, has a marketing team that works with record labels to promote artists' songs on the app. The company is led by Gen Zers — its CEO, Jacob Pace, is 21 years old — and it has developed a formula to help make songs take off on TikTok by first making small modifications to artists' tracks and then tapping the right influencers to boost a song's visibility. Flighthouse was recently hired by the independent record label 10k Projects to put together an influencer campaign for the Surfaces' song "Sunday Best," which helped drive over 20 million user-generated videos on the app and aided in the music duo's rise to the No. 1 spot on Billboard's emerging-artists list. The company has worked on a variety of other tracks that have trended on TikTok, including Arizona Zervas' "Roxanne," but most record labels ask them not to disclose when they're involved in running a paid promotion, the company said. "TikTok has opened up this door where anything's at play," said Adi Azran, the head of marketing at Flighthouse. "All old records, all new records — people don't care on TikTok as long as it's fun to make content with." Read more about Flighthouse's work on TikTok: How a media company that turns songs into TikTok trends helped 'Sunday Best' appear in over 20 million videos and become a global hit on Billboard and Spotify Interscope Chris Mortimer (head of digital marketing) Chris Mortimer leads all digital marketing efforts for Interscope's roster of artists including Lady Gaga, DaBaby, Billie Eilish, Selena Gomez, and Lil Mosey.  Interscope's campaigns on TikTok have helped promote streams for songs like Trevor Daniel's "Falling"; Lil Mosey's "Blueberry Faygo"; "Rain On Me" by Lady Gaga with Ariana Grande; and "Rockstar" by DaBaby ft Roddy Ricch, which has appeared in over 1.7 million videos on TikTok and has held steady as a top ten track on streaming platforms like Spotify and Apple Music. Prior to Interscope, Mortimer was in the startup media and entertainment space. He holds an MA in communications management from USC. Jason Derulo Jason Derulo (Jason Joel Desrouleaux) (music artist) While Jason Derulo achieved fame as a music artist well before TikTok entered the social-media scene, the singer has leaned heavily into the short-form video app in recent months.  Derulo, who has 31.5 million TikTok fans and regularly posts collaborative videos with the app's other top creators, has also used TikTok to promote his own tracks.  Derulo's newest single "Savage Love (Laxed – Siren Beat)," which he co-released with New Zealand music producer Jawsh 685, came to life after Derulo used an unauthorized sample of a Jawsh 685's track that had taken off on TikTok. The pair reconciled their differences and the song has continued to chart on streaming platforms like Spotify. Derulo also does sponsored posts for brands on his TikTok account. The artist told Complex Media last month that he earns over $75,000 for brand promotions on TikTok.  Legacy Recordings Andy McGrath (senior vice president of marketing) Legacy Recordings manages Sony Music's catalog of songs from artists that may or may not be still producing music, including performers like Billie Holliday, Bruce Springsteen, and David Bowie.  The company mostly takes a reactive approach to engaging with TikTok, though it has tested out promotions for some of its older tracks in the past year, enlisting influencers to try to draw attention to the 15th anniversary of Ciara's "Goodies" in September. Once a song does take off on TikTok, the company will encourage artists to create TikTok accounts and join in on a trend that involves their track.  "We drop a note to the artist, or his or her team, and say 'Hey, there might be something here. Are you aware of this? Are you interested in participating?'" Andy McGrath, senior vice president of marketing at Legacy Recordings, told Business Insider in May. "If we're talking about catalog artists — 90s, 80s, early 2000s — a lot of these artists may or may not have TikTok accounts," said Kerry Abner, a marketing manager focused on social media and streaming at Legacy Recordings. "We want to get them on the platform and start engaging with their fans there by inserting themselves into the challenge." Read more about Legacy Recording's strategy on TikTok: A Sony Music exec explains the label's TikTok strategy and how it responds when a song like 'Break My Stride' catches fire Movers+Shakers Evan Horowitz (CEO and cofounder) and Geoffrey Goldberg (chief creative and cofounder) Founded in 2016 by Evan Horowitz and Geoffrey Goldberg, Movers+Shakers is a creative marketing agency that specializes in music and dance-based ad campaigns on social-media platforms like TikTok. The company has created original music and dances for brand campaigns on TikTok, and its work with the beauty brand e.l.f. Cosmetics in October 2019 set a new standard for engagements on the app. Movers+Shakers created an original e.l.f. song for the marketing push, "Eyes. Lips. Face. (e.l.f.)," that's been used in over 1.7 million videos to date. The song has 18 million streams on Spotify and millions of plays on YouTube, and the campaign's hashtag "#eyeslipsface" has been viewed 6.3 billion times on TikTok. "I think the nature of TikTok as a platform is that it's one of the main places that music is being launched right now," Horowitz told Business Insider in May. "It's only natural that brands that create really good music that the community on TikTok really resonates with, that that music can start to trend and be successful outside of the platform." Read more about Movers+Shakers' work on TikTok: The agency behind one of TikTok's top ad campaigns says brands can build a massive audience through original music and dance trends but the 'window is closing quickly' ReignDeer Entertainment Larry Rudolph (CEO) Larry Rudolph runs ReignDeer Entertainment and is a senior partner at Maverick Management, a division of Live Nation Entertainment. Rudolph's ReignDeer Entertainment manages several of TikTok's biggest music stars including Loren Gray, Jaden Hossler (JXDN), and more recently Josh Richards. Rudolph also serves as a formal advisor to TalentX Entertainment (which represents Hossler and Richards), where his son serves as VP of music.  Rudolph is perhaps best known for discovering and managing Britney Spears. He has also served as a manager for Steven Tyler (Aerosmith), Pitbull, and The Backstreet Boys. "New young audiences want to consume music differently," Rudolph told Business Insider. "To have some TikTok star with 20 million eyeballs using your song gets an enormous amount of attention and gets an enormous number of active music listeners. As a marketing tool, it's a massive platform."   Republic Records Tim Hrycyshyn (VP of digital marketing) As VP of digital marketing at Republic Records, Tim Hrycyshyn leads a team of marketers focused on the label's online strategy for artists like Post Malone, Lil Wayne, Ariana Grande, Nicki Minaj, James Bay, the Jonas Brothers, and The Weeknd (who recently performed live for TikTok users in the app's first-ever augmented reality concert). Hrycyshyn joined the label in 2015 as a director of digital marketing after working in marketing roles at Independent Label Group and the Alternative Distribution Alliance.  Roc Nation Carolyn Girondo (associate director of digital marketing) Founded by Jay-Z in 2008, Roc Nation is a full-service entertainment agency that works with a variety of stars from Rihanna and Shakira to Lil Uzi Vert and Big Sean. As associate director of digital marketing, Girondo told Business Insider that TikTok has had a huge impact on the agency's new music releases as well as older songs in artists' catalogs.  When the company noticed that Mariah Carey's 2009 track "Obsessed" was taking off on TikTok, the company quickly helped Carey create an account to help promote the song to its users. "Obsessed" has since appeared in nearly four million user-generated videos on the app, and Carey now has 3.6 million fans on TikTok.   TalentX Entertainment Gavin Rudolph (VP of music) and Michael Gruen (VP of talent) Having grown up in the music industry (his father Larry Rudolph is also featured on this list as CEO of ReignDeer Entertainment), Gavin Rudolph runs the music department at TalentX Entertainment, a talent management firm focused on TikTok creators.  During his tenure at TalentX, Rudolph helped the upstart TikTok agency form a partnership with Sony/ATV Music Publishing, which is offering publishing and artist development services to TalentX's songwriters and artists. He also helped facilitate a deal with Warner Records to create TalentX Records – a joint venture between the two companies to promote TikTok artists like TalentX's Josh Richards. Michael Gruen manages TalentX's roster of TikTok stars as the company's VP of talent. He helped facilitate Richard's deal with Warner Records and signed former Sway LA member Jaden Hossler, who has since built out a career in the music industry. The Fuel Injector Devain Doolaramani (CEO and founder) and Ariell Nicholas Yahid (talent manager) The Fuel Injector is a talent-management company that primarily focuses on TikTok creators. The company does a lot of music marketing on the app, working on four to five paid song integrations a week, according to Ariell Nicholas Yahid, a talent manager at the company.  "It seems like a lot, but in the music industry there's about 100 songs a week," Yahid said. "I started music marketing back when it was Musical.ly, when I managed all these audio accounts," Doolaramami said. "We built out the roster with dancers and actual personas so we started marketing within our talent in different music niches." The company told Business Insider that it's worked on influencer-marketing promotions on TikTok for Rontae Don't Play's "I'm Single and I'm Lit," "Civil War" by Russ, and $uicideboy$'s "...And To Those I Love, Thanks For Sticking..." Read more about The Fuel Injector's work in music marketing on TikTok: TikTok influencers are getting paid thousands of dollars to promote songs, as the app becomes a major force in the music industry     Tiagz Tiagz (Tiago Garcia-Arenas) (music artist) The Canadian rapper Tiagz, 22, built a career as a music producer by strategically uploading songs to TikTok. Tiagz's strategy for growing an audience on TikTok has been to write songs that directly reference a phrase or idea that's become popular on the app. Since joining TikTok in August 2019, several of Tiagz's songs have gone viral through this method, appearing in millions of user-generated videos across the platform. Two years after he started producing music, Tiagz is now signed by the record label Epic Records and has millions of monthly listeners on streaming apps like Spotify. "I tried to understand the platform," Tiagz told Business Insider in April. "The trends work, but the quality of the music matters too because a lot of songs that I made are flops." Read more about Tiagz's rise on TikTok: Music artist Tiagz explains how he mastered TikTok's algorithm to score a major record deal, with help from Charli D'Amelio and a 1950s jazz classic TikTok's music division TikTok is well aware of the integral role that music plays in its platform's success, and it's staffed up accordingly to support artists, record labels, and music-oriented creators and brands who use its app. The company's music division is divided into three focus areas: music operations, music partnerships and artist relationships, and business development.  The music operations group handles all music programming decisions on the app. The team curates the playlists and songs that are promoted to TikTok users when they are looking to add a "sound" to a video. Its "Emerging Artists" playlist can help yet-to-be-discovered artists take off on the app. The company told Business Insider that "nearly 50 songs programmed by the TikTok music ops team reached the Billboard Hot 100 in May and June 2020 alone." TikTok's music partnerships and artist relationships team serves as the company's liaison between the app and artists and labels. Team members work with the music operations team to jumpstart TikTok trends and support official playlisting and hashtag promotions, while also helping to onboard new artists onto the app. The music partnerships and artist relationships team also handles artist events tied to TikTok, including The Weeknd's recent virtual performance on the app.  The music business development team focuses on negotiating content licensing deals with labels, publishing companies, and distributors.  Here is the full list of team members at TikTok who focus on music: Corey Sheridan (head of music content operations, North America) Isabel Quinteros, Sr. (manager, music partnerships and artist relations) Mary Rahmani (director of music content and artist relations) Daniel Gillick (senior manager, music content & label relations) Brandon Holman (label partnerships manager) Chayce Cheathem (label partnerships) Yuko Shen (music operations) Alec Feld (music operations) Macie Spear (music operations) Chayce Cheathem (music content & label relations) William Gruger (music editorial lead) Ben Markowitz (director of music operations) Jordan Lowy (director of music partnerships) Christina Beltramini (music partnerships) Todd Schefflin (senior manager of music partnerships) Bryan Cosgrove (creative music licensing) Tracy Gardner (head of label licensing & partnerships) Leah Linder (director of communications, music) Ole Obermann (VP, global head of music) Paul Hourican (music operations, EU) Farhad Zand (music partnerships, EU) Hari Nair (head of digital music, India) Fennie Chin (head of digital music, Southeast Asia) Henrique Fares Leite (music industry relations, Latin America) Toyin Mustapha (music content and artist partnerships, EU) James Underwood (music content manager, EU) TuneCore Andreaa Gleeson (chief revenue officer) TuneCore is a tech platform designed to enable artists and labels to distribute songs on platforms like TikTok, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Spotify, Google Play, and Tidal. The company makes money by charging a flat rate for each album, song, or ring tone that it distributes. Since it launched its distribution partnership with TikTok in October 2019, over 200,000 of TuneCore's artists have distributed 300,000 releases on the app. As chief revenue officer, Andreea Gleeson oversees marketing, artist support, international work, and entertainment relations at TuneCore. Her efforts have helped up-and-coming artists build fan bases on TikTok. Gleeson previously served as TuneCore's chief marketing officer. UnitedMasters David Melhado (head of artist marketing) UnitedMasters is a music distribution company that helps artists get songs placed on music streaming platforms and social-media apps like TikTok, YouTube, and Instagram. The company makes money by taking a 10% split of artists' royalties or charging creators a flat annual rate to use its platform.  UnitedMasters has become a key tool for newcomer artists to get their music distributed on the short-form video app.  Currently the head of artist marketing at UnitedMasters, David Melhado is responsible for promoting artist, product, and brand efforts for UnitedMasters' artist community. Melhado has helped develop the careers of some of today's biggest rap artists including NLE Choppa (3.8 million TikTok followers) and Gunna (450,000 TikTok followers), whose track "Drip Too Hard (Lil Baby & Gunna)" has been used in tens of thousands of user-generated videos on the app.    Universal Music Group Celine Joshua (general manager, commercial, content, and artist strategy) Celine Joshua joined Universal Music Group in 2018, where she leads the company's 10:22 pm imprint, a division of UMG focused on signing social-media influencers, digital-media creators, and recording artists. Joshua and 10:22 pm have sponsored the TikTok creator house Kids Next Door LA as part of their work promoting 10:22 catalog songs. Her team also worked directly with TikTok to test out the platform's push notification feature in order to promote electronic music artist Alesso's new track "Midnight." Prior to joining UMG, Joshua worked at Warner Music Group in the IT department, at Disney Music as Head of Digital, and at Sony Music Entertainment's Epic Records. 
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The coronavirus outbreak will have long-lasting effects on US workers, particularly when it comes to the open office made popular by Silicon Valley companies like Facebook and Google.  Experts say that the open office was never very positive for employees, who reported feeling less productive and more distracted, got sick more easily, and felt pressured to work longer and harder because of their lack of privacy.  When offices begin reopening, whether that's this year or next summer, we're likely to see a shift away from the open floor plan.  "Open floor plans are most definitely going to disappear," Rhiannon Staples, chief marketing officer at human resources management company Hibob, told Business Insider. "I feel like it was already on its way out and this was the kick it needed to get it out the door." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. As the coronavirus continues its spread, unabated, in many parts of the US, it's becoming increasingly apparent that a return to "normal" is still far in the future. That's true for American office workers, many of whom have been working from their homes since March. But when workers are able to return to work en masse, whether that's this winter or a year from now, the office probably won't look as they left it.  Corporations nationwide are considering how to reopen spaces, from new ventilation systems systems to socially distanced elevators and closed-off kitchens. But the biggest change might be to the space as a whole.  Experts predict that the wide-open office, popularized by tech industry titans like Google and Facebook, will become a thing of the past. The fad, already becoming passé, has become almost dangerous in the face of the virus — employees often sit packed in large, open rooms, with desks placed close enough to reach out and touch your coworker.  But don't mourn the death of that open-office floor plan just yet: though it was once heralded as the key to employee collaboration and productivity, it was never all that great for workers anyway.  The rise of the open office Beginning in the early aughts, American tech workers began leaving cubicles behind in favor of an open-floor-plan office space.  It all started with Google, which revealed its new headquarters, the Googleplex, in 2005. Based in Mountain View, California, it was — and still is — unlike any office in America. It had a bowling alley! And sleep pods! And even sand volleyball courts!  The Googleplex, with its open design and flexible spaces, was heralded as the future.  "The attitude was: We're inventing a new world, why do we need the old world?" Clive Wilkinson, the architect who designed the Googleplex, told Fast Company last year.   Soon, companies started coming to Wilkinson and saying they wanted to by like Google, he told Fast Company. Not long after, Facebook followed suit, opening what it says is the biggest open-floor-plan office in the world: approximately 2,800 employees working in "one giant room," CEO Mark Zuckerberg said when it opened in 2015.  "We saw a big pendulum shift where everyone came out of private offices and big cubicles into the open office, and that was an epic fail, because one size does not fit all. The open office has gotten a really bad rap as a result of doing it really badly," Melissa Hanley, CEO of the design firm Blitz, which counts Microsoft and Instacart among its clients, told Business Insider. At the time, the idea was that if you broke down physical barriers between workers, it would break down metaphorical ones as well. Employees would be able to easily collaborate on projects and would be enticed to engage in a free-flow of ideas with their next-door neighbor. The company's CEO, once ensconced in a glass corner office, would now sit right out on the floor next to their employees, a person of the people.  But that's not exactly what happened.  Instead, employees put on headphones to shut out the noise that came along with wide-open spaces. They reported feeling stressed, anxious, and less likely to collaborate with those around them. In fact, a Harvard Business Review study from last year found that when a company switched to an open office, face-to-face interactions actually decreased by 70% — employees just communicated electronically instead.  And that wasn't the only problem. A prescient 2018 piece by Vice's Mark Hay argued that open offices are vectors for disease, with employees who work in them taking more sick days than those who work in enclosed offices.  "In the workplace, it only follows that if you're working in close proximity and handling objects and interacting closely with each other, it's a very easy route of transmission for germs, viruses, bacteria," Melissa Perry, a public-health researcher at George Washington University's Milken Institute School of Public Health, told Business Insider earlier this year. Socializing productivity But beyond the prevalence of germs, there's another downside of the open office, at least for employees.  "The open-plan office has always been in some ways in the interest of the company rather than the worker, because it socializes productivity," Melissa Gregg, Intel's chief technologist for user experience, recently told The New York Times. "It forces workers to watch each other's work, and it creates very few spaces of privacy for individual workers."  Mentally, there's a pressure that comes with open offices. Workers don't want to look like they're not working hard, or like they're ducking out early. As Jeff Pochepan argued in Inc Magazine in 2018, this means that workers may work longer hours or feel undue pressure to be "on" and engaged 100% of the time, since everyone can see them.  "I definitely think there's a concept within agile workplaces about accountability and thinking that you set something out that you're going to do and then you have to report back, did you do it," Hanley said. "I do think that the visual access to each other is probably feeding into that."  Tracy Brower, a sociologist and principal in the Applied Research + Consulting Group at furniture manufacturer Steelcase, likened open offices to manufacturing, where workers generally kept an even, steady pace until a "rate-buster" came in — someone who worked harder and faster, thereby pushing the whole group too much. "There's hustle culture where, I may not actually be more productive, but by goodness, I'm going to stay later than my boss, no matter what," Brower told Business Insider. "I think we can get caught up in working for the sake of working and being busy for the sake of being busy."  'The kick it needed to get it out the door' In the short term, the office is already changing. Companies are considering density like never before, spacing out workstations, limiting large groups in conference rooms and elevators, and placing partitions in between desks, almost like the cubicles of yore.  But these cosmetic alterations are likely to be the precursor to a bigger change. Even though a full return to the office still appears to be a long way off, experts agree that when we do return — perhaps in summer 2021, as Google and Facebook expect — we should expect some permanent changes.  "Open floor plans are most definitely going to disappear," Rhiannon Staples, chief marketing officer at human resources management company Hibob, told Business Insider. "I feel like it was already on its way out and this was the kick it needed to get it out the door." But Brower said she doesn't think the open office is 100% dead — it's just going to feel different than it did in early 2020.  "The pendulum has really swung toward open, open, open, and lots of density," Brower said. "I think what has now happened is we're starting to swing that pendulum way to the other side — more barriers, more boundaries, less density." While that mentality is critical for the safety of employees in the near future, Brower said she doesn't expect things to stay that way.  "I think what we will end up seeing is that pendulum landing somewhere a little bit close to the middle," Brower said. "This is actually our opportunity to reimagine, reinvent, use the coronavirus almost as an accelerator to get to places that are maybe even better than it would have been." SEE ALSO: With no mandate to shut down even if employees get sick, one expert calls Silicon Valley's reopening 'a very easy route of transmission' Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How 'white savior' films like 'The Help' and 'Green Book' hurt Hollywood
Interbreeding gets a bad rap these days, but early humans loved a bit of interspecies action. Genes from fossils show our ancestors had entanglements with both Neanderthals and an ancient group called Denisovans. But new research suggests they also got it on with another mystery relative, whose DNA still exists in people today. Scientists from Cornell University and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory made the discovery by developing an algorithm that analyzes genomes. The software can identify segments of DNA that came from other species — even if it’s from an unknown source. The researchers applied the algorithm to genomes from two Neanderthals,… This story continues at The Next Web
My editor-in-chief dared me to pull a bunch of random topics out of a hat and write a compelling tech story about them. Here’s what I got: Jay-Z, neural networks, the US Navy SEALs, and jazz music. Luckily for me, I happened across this video featuring a group of talented jazz musicians interpreting a Deepfake AI-generated version of Jay-Z rapping the infamous Navy SEAL copypasta meme. Natch. Adam Neely, a popular music YouTuber with over a million subscribers, released the video as part of a CuriosityStream documentary. It features a very human quest to interpret a computer-generated rap acapella. Jay-Z is… This story continues at The Next Web
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I’m a big fan of outsourcing essential chores to robots. There is something therapeutic about handing over my responsibilities to a machine instead of another human. Robots have no feelings, no demands, no agency over their actions — they’re simply perfect vessels of servitude (a hot take I expect to pay dearly for when the singularity takes place). True, robots used to get a bad rap when it comes to actually doing their jobs right, but that has been changing recently. I used to be a skeptic, too, but my brief affair with the Roomba i7+ turned me into a believer. To be fair,… This story continues at The Next Web
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Your palms are sweaty, knees weak, arms are heavy — although I’m borrowing lyrics from Eminem, I’m not about to burst into rap, don’t worry. Instead, I want to draw your attention to the symptoms of stress or panic, two very unpleasant, yet common, states of mind experienced in times of crisis at work (or otherwise). If this sounds familiar, here are some tips to help you navigate a work crisis and come out feeling far more relaxed and in control. [Read: No, you’re not a failure — here’s how to deal with setbacks at work] Step 1: Identify the… This story continues at The Next Web
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Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) and the DC Extended Universe (DCEU) are two of the most prominent American Media franchises in the global cinematic world.MCU’s Iron Man, Captain America, and DCEU’s Wonder woman, Superman has delighted fans of all ages.His art showcases the two supervillains Thanos and Darkseid, from MCU and DCEU as rap gods in this Marvel/DC crossover.Both the villains have had numerous appearances in multiple comic books over the past couple of years.Snapokolips: A Rap Battle of Two Cosmic Beings A brand-new piece of artwork by SPDRMNKYXXIII features the two villains.According to reports, the title has taken inspiration from Bad Meets Evil album- Hell: The Sequel.
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For too long, Millennials have gotten a bad rap about money and their ability to save for a rainy day or retirement.However, a new “Relationship With Money” survey by financial services firm Edward Jones found that not only do more Americans born between 1981 and 1996 consider themselves “savers” than those in their parents’ Gen-X cohort (48 percent vs. 46 percent), but that Millennials also were better at socking away emergency funds (75 percent vs. 66 percent).That’s right.The same Millennials whose motto could be “Why buy a car when you can Uber?”“This debunks the myth that Millennials aren’t as financially focused as other generations,” says Edward Jones investment strategist Nela Richardson.And the survey isn’t some outlier.It’s supported by other research.The Federal Reserve Survey on Consumer Finances found that while Millennials are deep in debt, more than 42 percent have retirement accounts, the highest share for those under 35 years of age since 2001.Part of what’s driving Millennials’ emphasis on saving could stem from lingering memories of the Great Recession.“Back in the late 2000’s, the oldest cohort of millennials entered the worst job market since the Great Depression of the 1930’s,” says Richardson.“For younger millennials, watching their parents and other family members go through that experience may have also made them more aware of the risks of a market downturn or some other unexpected event, such as losing a home or a job, and so they’re more conservative when it comes to spending and saving in their adult lives,” says Richardson.One potential alarm bell uncovered by Edward Jones’ sampling of more than 2,000 adults nationally age 18 and over: While 92 percent were honest enough with themselves to recognize there was room for improvement in their financial health, the very thought of saving money sufficed to make more than a third feel either “anxious” or “overwhelmed.”If that sounds familiar, here are three steps to consider:• Identify your money-related emotions.People often have emotional responses to money.Getting a big bonus at work can make you feel euphoric; agonizing over what to do with it can be paralyzing even as the logical part of your brain (invest at least most of it) fights it out with the emotional part (splurge it all!).What’s key is knowing that letting your feelings dictate your spending, saving and investing choices can lead to poor decisions.• Develop a financial strategy.
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