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For too long, Millennials have gotten a bad rap about money and their ability to save for a rainy day or retirement.However, a new “Relationship With Money” survey by financial services firm Edward Jones found that not only do more Americans born between 1981 and 1996 consider themselves “savers” than those in their parents’ Gen-X cohort (48 percent vs. 46 percent), but that Millennials also were better at socking away emergency funds (75 percent vs. 66 percent).That’s right.The same Millennials whose motto could be “Why buy a car when you can Uber?”“This debunks the myth that Millennials aren’t as financially focused as other generations,” says Edward Jones investment strategist Nela Richardson.And the survey isn’t some outlier.It’s supported by other research.The Federal Reserve Survey on Consumer Finances found that while Millennials are deep in debt, more than 42 percent have retirement accounts, the highest share for those under 35 years of age since 2001.Part of what’s driving Millennials’ emphasis on saving could stem from lingering memories of the Great Recession.“Back in the late 2000’s, the oldest cohort of millennials entered the worst job market since the Great Depression of the 1930’s,” says Richardson.“For younger millennials, watching their parents and other family members go through that experience may have also made them more aware of the risks of a market downturn or some other unexpected event, such as losing a home or a job, and so they’re more conservative when it comes to spending and saving in their adult lives,” says Richardson.One potential alarm bell uncovered by Edward Jones’ sampling of more than 2,000 adults nationally age 18 and over: While 92 percent were honest enough with themselves to recognize there was room for improvement in their financial health, the very thought of saving money sufficed to make more than a third feel either “anxious” or “overwhelmed.”If that sounds familiar, here are three steps to consider:• Identify your money-related emotions.People often have emotional responses to money.Getting a big bonus at work can make you feel euphoric; agonizing over what to do with it can be paralyzing even as the logical part of your brain (invest at least most of it) fights it out with the emotional part (splurge it all!).What’s key is knowing that letting your feelings dictate your spending, saving and investing choices can lead to poor decisions.• Develop a financial strategy.
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Find songs online at the music video platform.Some ways to get started learning a language with song lyrics are: you can use websites to discover new artists.Stations like Planet Radio play the latest top 40 hits.
Earlier this month, Palantir, the secretive data analytics startup confidentially filed for an IPO, which has surprised some outsiders. But Palantir employees are "really itching to go public," said one former employee who spoke on condition of anonymity because workers are sworn to secrecy about company operations when they sign the startup's stringent non-disclosure agreements. Here's why Palantir employees want the company to go public, and why the descent of the coronavirus pandemic might have helped accelerate the IPO time frame.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. For 17 years, Palantir brushed off talk of going public, avoiding Silicon Valley's standard script for buzzy tech startups. Now with the coronavirus pandemic roiling the global economy, the company has decided the moment is right for a stock listing. The timing may seem like a bit of a head scratcher. But according to recently departed employees that Business Insider spoke to, the pressure to go public from inside Palantir has become increasingly difficult for management to ignore — and the changes brought about by the pandemic may have even pushed the situation to the brink. In company town halls, conducted over Zoom calls after the pandemic began, questions about the status of a potential initial public offering grew louder and more frequent, and there was a palpable sense that employees were growing restless, the sources said. Employees "would ask a lot of questions about the IPO," and in response, the company said that it was moving the IPO "up kind of considerably," one of the Palantir alums said.Staffers "are really itching to go public," the same source told Business Insider. Like other tech companies, Palantir competes for the limited supply of elite engineers who can be snapped up by tech giants like Google, Amazon and Microsoft, which have much greater resources. One of Palantir's longstanding lures, the former employees said, was extravagant office perks, including fully stocked kitchens, in-house chiropractors, and company happy hours. Those perks no longer carry the same weight as the pandemic has forced employees to work from their own kitchens and bedrooms. And Palantir's mystique of being a secretive company isn't as enticing a draw as it was in the company's early days, especially with the company facing protests for some of its work.  "The whole secret-sexy-tech-company-in-the-shadows brand made people want to work for us for a long time," one of the former employees said.  Cofounded by Peter Thiel in 2003, Palantir makes technology that crunches through huge and disparate pools of data to find patterns. The company's eager promotion of its data-mining services to government agencies like the Department of Defense and Immigration and Customs Enforcement has made it an outsider among its Silicon Valley peers who tout progressive values. Earlier this month Palantir said it confidentially filed preliminary paperwork for a stock listing, though it did not specify whether it planned to go public through a traditional initial public offering, or through a direct listing, in which insiders can sell their shares on the open market but the company itself does not raise any money. While Palantir has for years allowed its employees to sell their shares in the company to private investors, the scope and ease of sales, and the pricing, come with restrictions that employees would not be subject to if the shares were traded openly on the public markets. Employees have reportedly struggled to sell their shares on secondary markets, according to BuzzFeed. More recently, the company has paid some employee bonuses in restricted stock units (RSUs), as Business Insider's Becky Peterson has reported. Current and former employees can sell their RSUs only after the company exits by going public or getting acquired. Palantir was valued at $20 billion in a 2015 venture funding round, but the price of shares have decreased since then in private market sales. Earlier this year, secondary shares of the company regularly sold at a valuation between $8 billion and $12 billion, two investors told Business Insider in February.SEE ALSO: A former Apple TV designer built a livestreaming startup to challenge Twitch, and he's betting the key to winning will be live rap battles Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's what it's like to travel during the coronavirus outbreak
Caffeine, a Redwood City-based social broadcasting startup that has partnered with Drake and the Ultimate Rap League (URL), raised $113 million in Series D funding earlier this month. The ad-free livestreaming platform hosts free events that are attended by tens of thousands of viewers, who are encouraged to make comments in real time and purchase virtual props, like popcorn, and the profits are split between Caffeine and the livestreamer.  VCs at Andreessen Horowitz think that Caffeine can tap into new revenue streams that have monetization models that are superior to those that depend on ads, subscriptions, donations, and partnerships. Last weekend, Business Insider attended NOME X, the most important battle rap event of the year, to see what it's like to get the inside scoop on Caffeine's platform. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The 2002 film 8 Mile, which was loosely based on rapper Eminem's life, made millions of people familiar with battle rap, a form of rapping where rappers level insults at their competition and boast about their own successes. Eminem, who started his multimillion-dollar career as a battle rapper, placed second in the 1997 Rap Olympics, which is how rapper Dr. Dre and Interscope Records CEO Jimmy Iovine discovered his now famous EP, Slim Shady. Now, Silicon Valley is taking a shot at making battle rap mainstream, using livestreaming technology to push the bellicose bars directly onto people's phone and computer screens. And with much of the world stuck at home waiting out the coronavirus, VCs are betting the time for dueling MCs has never been better.  Caffeine, a Redwood City-based social broadcasting startup that has scored a collaboration with Canadian rapper Drake and the Ultimate Rap League (URL), raised $113 million in Series D funding this month to help give battle rap an audience of more than 2 million viewers. While Caffeine offers programming in entertainment, gaming, and sports, including ESPN and college sports, the platform's "anchor content is rap," Ben Keighran, a former Apple employee who cofounded the startup in 2016, recently told Bloomberg.  Caffeine, which officially launched in September 2019, was first backed by Silicon Valley VC firms Andreessen Horowitz and Greylock Partners, who also participated in the startup's latest funding round. Andreessen Horowitz was also an early backer of Genius (first launched as Rap Genius), the Hip-Hop-focused startup that saw the resignation of its disgraced co-founder Mahbod Moghadam in 2014, after he published and annotated excerpts from a mass murderer's 141-page manifesto on the startup's website. On the heels of its partnership with Drake and the URL, which became official in February 2020, Caffeine received another influx of cash in June from big players in the media industry, Fox Corp and Cox Enterprises, Inc., as well as Sanabil investments, a Saudi Arabia-based investment firm.  The coronavirus pandemic, which has led to the cancellation of live music events, including high profile music festivals like Coachella, has only increased the demand for live streamed entertainment, and it seems that investors have noticed.  Live streaming, which saw its origins with professional and amateur gamers, has also become a way for musicians, athletes, and lifestyle influencers to make money. Platforms like Twitch, YouTube live, Instagram, and Caffeine have allowed a new generation of personalities—from make-up artists to battle rappers—to find a fresh audience, all while making some cash.  Now more than ever, it seems that VCs are also thinking about the different strategies that startups can use to generate profits from live streams.  The lag time is less than 190 milliseconds Jonathan Lai and Andrew Chen, both Andreessen Horowitz partners, said in a blog post that platforms like Caffeine, which host live entertainment and programs that are in-tune with the moment's pop culture, are "the future of live video entertainment." What makes Caffeine so special is that the platform can "drive both rabid engagement and instant monetization," Lai and Chen said. Unlike most live streaming platforms, which can lag for up to 1 minute or more, Caffeine's live streams are much faster, streaming at an unprecedented speed of "sub-190-milliseconds"—think quicker than FaceTime, but with the potential to host an event for hundreds of thousands of viewers, who are free to make comments and purchase digital props in real time. Caffeine's live streams are much faster than Twitch's, which can lag for up to 30 seconds. To get an inside look at why Caffeine has attracted the attention of so many investors, Business Insider attended NOME X, URL's biggest battle rap event of the year, which was hosted on the livestreaming platform this weekend. In the first round of the day, battle rappers Jey the Nitewing and Fonz took the virtual live streaming stage and rapped about topics that resonated with our current moment: social distancing, Game of Thrones Season 8, and Lebron James leaving the Cleveland Cavaliers. Audience members, identifiable by their usernames and photographs, can be seen commenting on the battle and purchasing virtual props such as popcorn, which viewers can give to their favorite rapper in real time to show their support. Currently, Caffeine makes money when viewers purchase virtual props, which resemble emojis. Performers receive a cut of the sale as well, though the specific portion of sales rapper receive is unclear. Caffeine viewers spend, on average, $78 on digital props every 3 months.   By allowing users to make comments and purchase props in real time, "Caffeine connects entertainers with world-class technology so that they can create content that is authentic and connects culture and community," said Caffeine CEO Ben Keighran, per Reuters. And every week, tens of thousands of viewers are tuning in to live battles.   American Idol popularized the idea of calling in to vote for your favorite contestant in real time on broadcast television, which helped lead the show to its unprecedented success. Now, Caffeine allows audience members to see others' reactions even before the winner is declared, creating a sense of virtual camaraderie among live stream attendees. And as soon as Fonz was declared the winner of the battle last weekend, viewers were able to react to the news as well as see what others had to say about the decision, including jokes about how much of the $25,000 prize Fonz will take home after taxes.  Like many venture-backed startups, Caffeine is not profitable, but revenues are on the rise, according to Bloomberg.  There are not currently any ads on Caffeine, and the content is free to watch for viewers. VCs are betting that Caffeine will keep finding innovative ways to monetize viewer engagement as people stuck at home during lockdowns look for new forms of real-time, online entertainment. Twitch's Just Chatting category, which, like Caffeine, includes live streams where streamers are able to talk to their viewers, "has grown nearly four times as quickly as Twitch overall," according to Lai and Chen, per their blog post. And with growth comes new opportunities for generating revenue.  Caffeine does not disclose its number of active users, but it says that 2 million new users registered to use the service in the past year.  In general, professional live streamers become popular because of their personalities and their ability to engage with an audience, including loyal fans, and battle rappers especially benefit from boasting about themselves and airing out their competitions' dirty laundry.  "Lifestyle streamers are often intimately acquainted with their followers," Lai and Chen said in their blog post, "so much so, that many greet returning fans by name and take suggestions for their daily agenda." The question now is whether the cult of the live streaming personality will be powerful enough to generate profits from viewers' direct engagement.  And whether Caffeine, just like Eminem, might soon find its way from battle rap to millions in profit. SEE ALSO: The big winner of Uber's $2.65 billion Postmates acquisition is Spark Capital, a small VC firm that's enjoying a streak of hits in a gloomy 2020. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Food additives get a bad rap, but a natural ingredient from orange peels and apple skins, pectin, is a thickener safely added to many food products, most notably jellies. The additive is also the subject of a University of Illinois experiment highlighting both the power and the challenges of public-private partnerships in university research.
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For too long, Millennials have gotten a bad rap about money and their ability to save for a rainy day or retirement.However, a new “Relationship With Money” survey by financial services firm Edward Jones found that not only do more Americans born between 1981 and 1996 consider themselves “savers” than those in their parents’ Gen-X cohort (48 percent vs. 46 percent), but that Millennials also were better at socking away emergency funds (75 percent vs. 66 percent).That’s right.The same Millennials whose motto could be “Why buy a car when you can Uber?”“This debunks the myth that Millennials aren’t as financially focused as other generations,” says Edward Jones investment strategist Nela Richardson.And the survey isn’t some outlier.It’s supported by other research.The Federal Reserve Survey on Consumer Finances found that while Millennials are deep in debt, more than 42 percent have retirement accounts, the highest share for those under 35 years of age since 2001.Part of what’s driving Millennials’ emphasis on saving could stem from lingering memories of the Great Recession.“Back in the late 2000’s, the oldest cohort of millennials entered the worst job market since the Great Depression of the 1930’s,” says Richardson.“For younger millennials, watching their parents and other family members go through that experience may have also made them more aware of the risks of a market downturn or some other unexpected event, such as losing a home or a job, and so they’re more conservative when it comes to spending and saving in their adult lives,” says Richardson.One potential alarm bell uncovered by Edward Jones’ sampling of more than 2,000 adults nationally age 18 and over: While 92 percent were honest enough with themselves to recognize there was room for improvement in their financial health, the very thought of saving money sufficed to make more than a third feel either “anxious” or “overwhelmed.”If that sounds familiar, here are three steps to consider:• Identify your money-related emotions.People often have emotional responses to money.Getting a big bonus at work can make you feel euphoric; agonizing over what to do with it can be paralyzing even as the logical part of your brain (invest at least most of it) fights it out with the emotional part (splurge it all!).What’s key is knowing that letting your feelings dictate your spending, saving and investing choices can lead to poor decisions.• Develop a financial strategy.
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