Congressional testimony by health experts is overruled hours later by the president.
5
Sponsored
The web has had depends upon within the confines of your house where you can be in touch with anyone on the planet and actually enjoy the experience of gambling in an online casino if you consult an on the web casino directory and get the best information.Because there are so several websites providing various kinds of position products, poker games, roulette, craps, blackjack and other gambling games, it is important to choose a web site that provides an directory providing information regarding the trusted on the web casinos.Some committed sites provide the info in various languages to ensure that people from those countries may take advantage of the same.You ought to select a listing that delivers trusted information regarding the web casinos and the kinds of activities being provided by them.Moreover, since a person consumes in online gaming to be able to have adventure and fun and to get off the tensions of his daily routine, he needs to be joker123 slot to a trusted on line casino that's secure and genuine.Furthermore, the listing ought to be index-based providing ideal links to the gambling sites.Moreover, it should just have the listing of casinos that provide great customer service.Their sole aim should not be merely to make money.
President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he wanted to assassinate Syrian dictator Bashar Assad, contradicting his own past denials that he had ever considered killing Assad and weakening his claim to be an anti-war president.“I would have rather taken him out. I had him all set,” Trump told ”Fox & Friends” in response to a question about Assad. Trump blamed his former defense secretary, retired Marine Gen. Jim Mattis, for holding him back: “Mattis didn’t want to do it. Mattis was a highly overrated general and I let him go.”The president is pitching himself as less hawkish than most politicians from both major political parties in his reelection bid, going so far as promoting an anti-immigrant Norwegian politician’s improbable nomination of Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize. Trump’s campaign hailed the suggestion with Facebook ads, but misspelled the Nobel prize as Noble.That nomination ― the second for Trump by the same politician ― was already an absurd long shot, given the president’s brutal policies that have dramatically increased civilian casualties abroad as a result of US operations, and included troop buildups across the Middle East and enthusiasm for shows of force like dropping the so-called mother of all bombs in Afghanistan. The Assad boast is a reminder that the president’s claimed dovishness is far less consistent than his penchant for impulsive escalations that could have serious and worrying national security consequences ― and make war more likely.In trying to protect his family’s decades of authoritarian rule after popular uprisings began in Syria in 2011, Assad has repeatedly used chemical weapons against his own people and has killed tens of thousands of Syrians by other means. Trump considered the assassination in April 2017, after the first major Syrian chemical weapons attack of his presidency, journalist Bob Woodward revealed in a book published in 2018. “Let’s kill the fucking lot of them,” Trump said, per Woodward. He ultimately settled on a limited airstrike against Assad’s forces ― the first US intervention of that kind in the Syrian civil war.Trump deniedconsidering assassinating Assad after Woodward’s book came out, as did aides like then-US ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley. Now he has undercut his own denial ― while boosting Woodward’s credibility as he defends his new book that says Trump knowingly misled Americans about the seriousness of the coronavirus pandemic and endangered millions of people. Earlier this year, Trump ordered the assassination of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, a killing that past presidents and American allies had previously considered but judged too risky. His decision exacerbated a downward spiral in US-Iran relations that he triggered by withdrawing from an international agreement to rein in Iran’s nuclear program, prompting the Islamic republic to expand its nuclear work beyond the limits of that deal and to weigh retribution with plans like a plot to kill the U.S. ambassador in South Africa recently revealed by Politico....caused over so many years. Any attack by Iran, in any form, against the United States will be met with an attack on Iran that will be 1,000 times greater in magnitude!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) September 15, 2020Trump ramped up tensions with Iran further on Monday night, tweeting: ”Any attack by Iran, in any form, against the United States will be met with an attack on Iran that will be 1,000 times greater in magnitude!”To the extent that Trump is wary of foreign entanglements, the president has made clear that his view is about what he perceives as priorities rather than concern for global peace or human rights. He began a withdrawal of American forces from Syria last year despite concerns from national security experts about possible devastating consequences for Kurds who helped the US fight the Islamic State ― then reversed course weeks later because he became convinced troops should stay “only for the oil.” When Fox host Brian Kilmeade asked Trump if he regretted not killing Assad, who has resumed using chemical weapons and widespread torture since the incident that prompted the president’s talk of an assassination, Trump answered: “I don’t regret that. I could have lived either way with that.”Later on Tuesday, Trump welcomed officials from Israel, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain to the White House to formalise relations between the Jewish state and those two Arab nations. Trump and his supporters say those deals represent major progress toward broader peace in the Middle East. The Palestinians ― the main party in conflict with the Israelis ― and most outside analysts reject that claim.Related... 4 Lies In 1 Sentence: CNN Fact-Checker Says Trump May Have Just Set A Record Trump Campaign Uses Russian Fighter Jets In 9/11 'Support Our Troops' Ad Trump Audio Shows He Freaked Out Over A Sneeze Even As He Downplayed Covid-19
10
Air Force bombers have been busy over Eastern Europe and around Alaska in recent months, amid heightened tensions between Russia and NATO.
6
Arm cofounder wants to stop Nvidia from buying the chip design firm for $40 billion acquisition, citing risks to its business model and customers.
3
The drills began Monday, and come after Taiwan expressed anger at an increase in military maneuvering by mainland Chinese forces.
7
Brexit is very much back on the agenda and it’s all feeling a bit 2019, with Tories rebelling against Boris Johnson and a big parliamentary showdown looming.This being Brexit, the substance of the row over the Internal Market Bill is also quite complicated.Here’s everything you need to know.What is the government doing?The government’s Internal Market Bill contains a highly controversial section that seeks to give UK ministers, and UK ministers alone, powers to go back on parts of the Brexit withdrawal agreement (WA) Johnson agreed with the EU last year.The WA triggered the standstill transition period which the UK and EU now find themselves in until December 31, when Brussels rules will largely no longer apply here unless agreed otherwise.It also dealt with the so-called “divorce bill”, citizens’ rights, and the thorny issue of maintaining an invisible land border between Northern Ireland (in the UK) and the Republic of Ireland (in the EU), as physical frontier posts were a target for attacks during the Troubles.The WA did this by making Northern Ireland follow EU rules in some areas where the rest of the UK would not, creating the need for some checks between the province and the British mainland (instead of north and south on the island of Ireland).Despite proclaiming the deal “oven ready” during December’s election, the prime minister now wants to take powers to go back on key sections of the WA and give the UK the ability to decide how key aspects of trade in Northern Ireland work.Why does Boris Johnson want to go back on his own Brexit deal? This is where things get complicated, but stay with us.Downing Street insists the Bill is simply a “safety net” to govern key areas of trade in Northern Ireland if the UK and EU cannot agree how it will work through the so-called joint committee set up by WA.Talks in the joint committee have been going on all year, led by Michael Gove on the UK side and Maros Sefcovic on the EU side, but they have failed to agree so far.In the event of those talks failing to reach a conclusion, the UK wants to use the Bill’s powers to decide on its own what constitutes state aid – government subsidies for businesses or industries in Northern Ireland – and therefore must be notified to Brussels.This Bill also gives ministers powers to disapply the need for exit summary declarations (as required under EU customs code) for goods moving between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK. The government has argued it needs to bring in the measures to ensure Northern Ireland is not cut adrift from the rest of the UK. It also fears that the EU could use state aid rules that apply to the province to bind the government’s hands across the whole UK.But some have questioned whether it could be a negotiating tactic with negotiations on a big overarching trade deal stalled.And there have also been suggestions that Johnson is trying to correct mistakes he himself made in the rushed negotiations by signing up to the WA without being fully aware of its consequences.Why are people angry?Northern Ireland secretary Brandon Lewis was forced to admit last week the Bill does “break international law”.It has sparked a Tory backlash and all five of the UK’s living former prime ministers have now sharply criticised the government."Yes, this does break international law in a very specific and limited way."Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis says the UK's plan for possible changes to the Withdrawal Agreement would go against international law but that "there are clear precedents" to do so. pic.twitter.com/9IsJf40jVV— Channel 4 News (@Channel4News) September 8, 2020Much of the concern centres around the UK’s global reputation for upholding the rules.Critics argue that going back on a deal signed just eight  months ago would imperil this reputation, and could damage the economy because the UK is a leader in sectors from accounting to finance to law precisely because it is trusted to follow the rules.There are also deep concerns that it could undermine the UK’s foreign policy when it is trying to hold aggressive states like Russia, China and Iran accountable to international law.But does it break the law?The government’s line has since evolved, with justice secretary Robert Buckland insisting that international law would only be broken if the powers in the Bill, which he described as an “insurance policy”, are actually used by ministers.According to the Institute for Government even if the powers in the Bill are not used, simply passing the legislation through parliament would breach Article 4 of the WA, which requires the UK to give full legal effect to that deal.On ministers’ powers, the IfG’s Raphael Hogarth has written: “However, unless the powers were actually used, the UK would not be in breach of the state aid and customs provisions of the Northern Ireland protocol.“The Bill is nevertheless concerning: it breaches international law, lays the ground for much more extensive breaches of international law, and tries to insulate ministers from judicial scrutiny at home.”"If I see the rule of law being broken in a way that I find unacceptable then of course I will go," says Justice Secretary Robert Buckland, about the government’s internal market bill which could breach international law#Marrhttps://t.co/Qoevttrfzepic.twitter.com/9vawyPqPmG— BBC Politics (@BBCPolitics) September 13, 2020 How has the EU reacted?Not well. It has given Johnson an end-of-the month deadline to drop the legislation or face the potential of negotiations on a trade deal collapsing due to the loss of “trust”.Meanwhile, the rising tensions spilled over into a very public Twitter spat between the UK and EU’s chief negotiators David Frost and Michel Barnier over food imports, although No.10 has blamed Brussels for starting the row. 1/7 I would like to make a few comments and state a few facts, in my capacity as the PM's negotiator in the current and last autumn's talks. https://t.co/qJ2hGUf5RM— David Frost (@DavidGHFrost) September 13, 2020 So is the prime minister going to lose in the Commons?One Tory told HuffPost UK there were “definitely more than 40 angry” Tories who could join Labour in voting against the government’s wishes, putting the PM at risk of a first Commons defeat since December’s election.Rebels are coalescing around an amendment proposed by senior Tory and Commons justice committee chair Bob Neill, which would give MPs a veto over powers in the Bill coming into force.But some hardened opponents of the plans do not even believe that amendment, to be voted on next week, goes far enough.One Tory predicted as many as 20 to 30 Tories could oppose the Bill outright at second reading, its first Commons stage, on Monday night.A further 20 could abstain, they suggested, putting the Bill at risk of defeat in its first vote.But other observers feel many rebels will largely keep their powder dry until next week’s vote on Neill’s amendment, and possibly others.If the DUP backs the government, as seems likely given that the Bill is designed to ensure Northern Ireland remains closer to the rest of the UK than envisaged in the WA, it will make it harder for the rebels to win.And don’t rule out a government compromise if the rebellion continues to grow.Johnson has already been holding talks with unhappy MPs and will address the Commons on Monday in a surprise appearance.If the carrot doesn’t work, the PM may turn to the stick and make rebelling an offence punishable with sacking from the Conservative Party, as he did with 21 Tories last year. Related... Boris Johnson To Make Surprise Speech In Bid To Subdue Tory Brexit Rebellion David Cameron Becomes Fifth Former PM To Slam Law-Breaking Brexit Plan Justice Secretary Suggests He Could Quit If UK Breaks Law Over Brexit
5
Lily James in Rebecca | Netflix OK so I got out of my rerun rut and binged Away on Netflix over Labor Day and... I really wanted to like it! The acting was so good, and it looked beautiful, but the script just strained credibility at every turn. It got off to a promising start with an incident aboard the spacecraft that makes the rest of the crew question whether first-time commander Emma Green (Hilary Swank) is really up to the long haul mission of guiding them to Mars. And there are great performances from a top-notch cast. I just wish the writers had resisted the urge to include the standard rom-com tensions and the endless Eureka! moments (ex: person on Earth gets a static electricity shock and realizes it may be the key to helping the space crew out of its... Continue reading…
10
The revelation is likely to contribute to internal tensions at Facebook, where employees have protested far-right organizing on the platform.
6
Sponsored
Super-P Force Description  Of Super-P Force:super p-force (Sildenafil Citrate 100mg and Dapoxetine 60mg) pill wants to be taken simply after an earlier assent with the specialist as this will make the individual to accept the right dose according to your well being.The pill of P-Force consequently passes on out the best satisfying outcome over both the issues and improves the demonstration of men in bed.This drug helps a person to get excited at the time of sexual tensions and this drug works by rushing the blood to the clitoris of a woman that helps her in getting an orgasm in a better way as more blood rushes towards the pussy of a woman.Again, this drug required a person to be sexually stimulated and does not work on its own.How to work Super-P Force:Sildenafil in Super P-Force capsule acts on the erectile tissue of the penis to increase blood stream which causes an erection.During sexual stimulation nitric oxide is released in the erectile tissue of the penis which operate the enzyme guanylate cyclase.This enzyme increases levels of a chemical called cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which relaxes the blood vessels in the penis and allows blood to fill the spongy erectile tissues to cause an erection.Another enzyme called phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) breaks down cGMP preventing blood flow into the penis, which causes loss of an erection.
Sponsored
Recently, with the threat to data security and increased tensions between India and China at the borders, the Central Indian government had banned several Chinese apps than even includes PUBG.What is the concept used in PUBG?If you are thinking “how to make a game like PUBG”, first you need to know about PUBG and its inception.The widespread mobile version of PUBG was introduced by a video game company from China named Tencent Mobile International Limited in February 2018.PUBG mobile had a vast network of professional gamers in India, who participated even in global competitions.Points to consider while building an app like PUBG: Game Idea: PUBG was successful in India mainly due to its real-time gameplay tactics and user-friendly features.Players became addictive and highly engaged as the game included such exciting operations.
Over 300 Chinese troops reportedly parachuted over the Tibetan Plateau in a recent exercise, suggesting they're preparing for a high-altitude clash.
7
Sponsored
The global body armor market size is expected to reach USD 2,510.2 million by 2026 according to a new study by Polaris Market Research.The report “Body Armor Market Share, Size, Trends, Industry Analysis Report By Level, By Material (Metals & Alloys, Composite, Fibers, Fiberglass and Others); By Application (Defense & Security Personnel, Law Enforcement Officers, Civilians); By Product, By Style; By Regions, Segments & Forecast, 2019 – 2026” gives a detailed insight into current market dynamics and provides analysis on future market growth.The moving concern displayed by defense and security industry towards safety and security of military personnel is propelling the need for body armor.Several developed and developing nations are conducting modernization program in the best interests of security and military personnel.Lately, precision technologies such as liquid body armor and dragon skin are contributing value to the market.Get Sample PDF : https://www.polarismarketresearch.com/industry-analysis/body-armor-market/request-for-sample The key players in the market include BAE Systems, Inc., Honeywell International, Inc., U.S. Armor Corporation, DuPont Deenside LTD., Blank Enterprises, Inc., Sarkar Defense Solutions, MKU Pvt.Ltd., Safariland LLC, Uvex Group, Avon Protections Systems, Inc. Aegis Engineering Ltd., AR500 Armor, Ballistic Body Armour (Pty) Ltd, Craig International Ballistics Pty Ltd., Hellweg International, Kejo Limited Company, Pacific Safety Products and Ceredyne (3M) among others.However cross-border tensions, global anarchy, regional warfare and a stimulus package by way of government thought for safety of armed forces personnel drives growth for body armor market.Earlier body armors were only licensed to soldiers but now due to escalating war-like tensions in the border areas, it is used by security guards, police and individuals to feel safe.Rising incidents of clashes and frictions observed in Asia, Middle East, Sub Saharan region, Russia and other nations related to terrorism, piracy, arms smuggling, drugs and exploitation are taking a toll on human lives.
President Donald Trump last week denied that systemic racism was a problem in the United States. Yet as British screen icon Stephen Fry pointed out, Trump has been a huge beneficiary of it, both politically and financially.In a new video for Pindex, Fry highlighted the “hidden tricks behind Trump’s wealth” that were skewed against people of colour and which he had taken advantage of even while exploiting racial tensions as president. At one point, Fry noted, Trump posted fake stats “painting Blacks as the cause of nearly all white deaths” while his “favourite channel” ― Fox News ― pushed racist talking points on his behalf. Fry also shared a clip of Fox News host Tucker Carlson claiming systemic racism had “no real definition.”“It’s defined as racism that is embedded as normal practice,” Fry said before sharing an example from Carlson’s own show. “Like a racist was embedded as Carlson’s scriptwriter.” Fry, who was once voted the most intelligent person on British television, then cited a study that said the president’s divisive approach may have backfired.“Most have woken up to the shocking extent of systemic racism and stand more firmly against it,” he said. See Fry’s full explanation below. READ MORE: Stephen Fry Issues Inspirational Call For Kindness Amid Coronavirus Crisis Stephen Fry Admits He Fears Becoming 'Professionally Mentally Unstable' As He Opens Up About Bipolar Strictly Come Dancing Won’t Be Signing Up Stephen Fry Anytime Soon
10
The head of the government’s legal department has quit, reportedly over suggestions that Boris Johnson is trying to renege on parts of his own Brexit deal.Jonathan Jones becomes the sixth senior civil servant to leave the government this year amid growing tensions between the prime minister and Whitehall.The Financial Times reported that Jones quit over Johnson’s plan to unilaterally claim powers for the UK to decide how sections of his own Brexit withdrawal agreement (WA) covering trade in Northern Ireland work.Several experts believe the proposals in the Internal Market Bill, due to be published on Wednesday, effectively breach the WA that Johnson negotiated to take the UK out of the EU.The plans risk collapsing crucial Brexit negotiations on a longer-term trade deal, ongoing in London now.Jones’ departure came as the hardline Tory Brexiteer European Research Group (ERG) declared that “Brexit is not done” until Johnson succeeds in nullifying key parts of the WA.IN DEPTH Is Boris Johnson Really About To Blow Up The Brexit Negotiations?If the talks break down the UK would default World Trade Organisation terms for trade with the EU from January, which is likely to cause at least short-term economic damage.A spokesperson for the attorney general’s office confirmed Jones’ departure but would not comment on his motivation.“We can confirm that Jonathan Jones has resigned. We won’t be commenting further,” they said. The EU has made clear that any attempt to renege on the WA would risk a collapse in negotiations.A Brussels spokesperson insisted on Monday that insisting that implementing the WA is a “precondition” for negotiations on a trade deal, declaring it a “matter of trust”.Downing Street has stressed the moves are simply a “safety net” to ensure there is not legal confusion if the UK and EU, through the so-called “joint committee” that monitors the implementation of the WA, cannot agree on Northern Ireland.A UK official has also insisted it is “completely committed” to the WA, and described the legislation as “minor clarifications”.But experts told HuffPost UK the moves are at the very least a first step towards reneging on the WA.Sir Bernard Jenkin, who chairs the steering group of the Tory Eurosceptics’ body ERG (European Resource Group), said: “If we don’t reach a deal with the EU, Brexit is not done until the UK government succeeds in its determination to assert its own interpretation of the withdrawal agreement.“If the EU is unwilling to do a deal with us, there are two options. The first is to enact domestic legislation that will largely nullify the direct effect and direct applicability of EU law. We have the mandate and majority to do this.“Second, if the EU insists on an unreasonable interpretation of the withdrawal agreement, the UK must stand ready to repudiate it.“I hope it is not necessary, but if it is the only way to achieve UK prosperity and the kind of sovereign independence which is the democratic right of any nation recognised under the UN Charter, then so be it.“And most other nations would respect us for that.”Jones’ departure follows the exit of cabinet secretary Sir Mark Sedwill, Simon McDonald from the Foreign Office, Philip Rutnam from the Home Office amid a row with home secretary Priti Patel, Richard Heaton from the Ministry of Justice and Jonathan Slater from the Department for Education following the summer’s exams fiasco.Related... Is Boris Johnson Really About To Blow Up The Brexit Negotiations? Will Boris Johnson’s No-Deal Brexit Gamble Hurt Keir Starmer More Than The PM? Boris Johnson To Tell EU That His 'Very Good', 'Great', 'Wonderful' Deal Didn't Make Sense
5
Rep. Val Demings of Florida told ABC News the president has been stoking tensions amid protests when he should be "trying to sow peace and calm."
6
Sponsored
The Indian government has banned 118 Chinese mobile apps, including Alibaba's payment app Alipay, citing cybersecurity concerns.
9
China has raised its pressure on Taiwan, using harsh rhetoric and flexing military muscle around what it sees as a breakaway province.
10
India banned another 118 Chinese-made apps, including Tencent’s popular video game PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, as border tensions escalated.
4
The first Thursday of September has long been known as “Super Thursday” in UK publishing: the day in the calendar when the largest number of new titles hit the shelves, with booksellers hoping to entice readers hunkering down for autumn with a cup of tea and a good book. Or two. Or 10.This year, no thanks to Covid-19 and months of lockdown, Super Thursday’s book pile is teetering like a Jenga tower – with all the launches that were scheduled for summer festivals and holiday reading held over and added to an already chocabloc autumn list. More than 600 hardbacks alone are being published on September 3, the Guardian reported.With so many reads to choose from, we thought we’d ask booksellers which ones have them most excited. Here’s their rundown of the class of 2020 – from debut authors to more familiar names. Just don’t forget the joys of browsing for yourself. Visit your local bookshop and they’ll be sure to help you find more.Related... These Are All The Books Brits Have Been Reading During Lockdown 9 New Releases For Fiction FansAs recommended by Bea Carvalho, fiction buyer at Waterstones.1) Who They Was – Gabriel Krauze“2020 has seen an incredibly strong selection of debut voices, as showcased by the Booker longlist which includes a majority of eight debuts including Kiley Reid’s Such a Fun Age, C Pam Zhang’s How Much of These Hills is Gold, and Brandon Taylor’s Real Life. Hitting the shelves on Super Thursday with a Booker longlisting already under its belt, Gabriel Krauze’s debut is one of the year’s most hotly anticipated. This unflinching portrayal of violence on London’s streets is a highly original piece of fiction from an exciting, authentic new voice.”2)  On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous – Ocean Vuong“The poet’s debut novel was one of last year’s most celebrated works of literary fiction, and this new edition promises to be one of 2020’s biggest paperbacks. A triumphant work of self-discovery which ponders the immigrant experience and barriers of language, sexuality, and race with compassion and urgency.”3) The Thursday Murder Club –  Richard Osman“Pointless star Richard Osman’s debut novel sees a group of octogenarian amateur sleuths attempting to solve a murder from their usually peaceful retirement village. Smart, funny, and filled with killer one-liners, this is a thoroughly contemporary take on a classic murder mystery.”4) Daddy – Emma Cline“The debut short story collection from the author of The Girls is filled with dark, understated gems which will thrill fans of her novel. Interrogating gender roles, familial relationships, and the latent violence in every day interactions, this is a tense and assured collection from an author with a rare knack for characterisation.”5) Your House Will Pay – Steph Cha“Steph Cha’s UK debut arrived earlier this year but Super Thursday sees its paperback release. This striking, confident thriller about two families on either sides of the LA race riots in the 1990s is at once a powerful cross-generational family saga and an urgent examination of racial politics.”6) Sad Janet – Lucie Britsch“A whipsmart, biting piece of tragicomedy which manages to inspire real laughter while celebrating sadness. Hilarious, profound and deeply refreshing, Lucie Britsch’s acerbic, pitch-perfect writing will appeal to fans of Ottessa Moshfegh.”7) Love Orange – Natasha Randall“Natasha Randall expertly deconstructs the narrative of the American Dream in this satirical 21st century family saga. A shrewd, witty novel which skewers modern life to vivid, discomforting effect.” 8) The Night of the Flood – Zoe Summerville“A taught, evocative literary thriller which conjures 1950s Norfolk and the mirrored tensions of a love triangle and a fateful storm to dazzling effect.” 9) The Silver Arrow – Lev Grossman“The fantasy author makes his children’s debut with this magical adventure of derring-do, in which two siblings journey aboard a steam train with a mind of its own. A fun new direction for Grossman, introducing his writing to younger readers.’Related... All The Independent Bookshops Still Delivering During Lockdown, Mapped 4 More From An Indie BookstoreAs recommended by Jonathan Main from Bookseller Crow, London SE19.10) Laura Laura by Richard Francis“Richard Francis is one of the UK’s most underrated novelists.”11) To Cook A Bear – Mikael Niemi“Brilliant Swedish historical crime fiction.”12) The Glass Kingdom – Lawrence Osbourne“A sinister and claustrophobic story set in Bangkok.”13) New Daughters of Africa by Margaret Busby“A long awaited paperback, following the £35 hardback earlier in the year.”Related... Why Poetry Matters, Plus 3 Great Collections To Get You Started 9 Cracking Reads From Across The GenresAs recommended by Emma Bradshaw, head of campaigns at the Booksellers Association14) The Wild Silence – Raynor Winn“Raynor Winn’s debut, The Salt Path, was shortlisted for the bookseller-curated Books Are My Bag readers awards, and was a big hit with customers. We’re excited for her second book, The Wild Silence, another true tale of triumph over adversity.”15) Fattily Ever After: A Fat, Black Girl’s Guide to Living Life Unapologetically – Stephanie Yeboah“The first novel from body-positivity advocate and blogger sensation, Stephanie Yeboah, Fattily Ever After is definitely one to pre-order.”16) The Harpy – Megan Hunter“Megan Hunter’s first novel, The End We Start From, was shortlisted for the ‘Books Are My Bag’ readers awards. This hotly anticipated dark fairy tale, The Harpy, is independent booksellers’ fiction book of the month.”17) Duty of Care: One NHS Doctor’s Story of Courage and Compassion on the Covid-19 Frontline – Dominic Pimenta“The first book from a doctor on the Covid-19 frontline, with all royalties going straight to the Heroes charity to support and protect healthcare workers.”18) Us Three – Ruth JonesHaving made her name as the creator and star of Gavin & Stacey, Ruth Jones made her move into the book world with her bestselling debut Never Greener. An engrossing tale of friendship, Us Three is her anticipated second novel.19) A Girl Made of Air – Nydia Hetherington“For fans of Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus and The Binding by Bridget Collins, this magical debut from actress-turned-writer Nydia Hetherington is just the kind of book to curl up and escape to as the days get shorter.”20) Fake Law: The Truth About Justice in an Age of Lies – The Secret Barrister:“A previous Books Are My Bag award-winner, we’re very excited to get our hands on a copy of The Secret Barrister’s second book.”21) Tamarind & the Star of Ishta – Jasbinder Bilan“Following the success of Jasbinder Bilan’s first spellbinding children’s book, which won a Costa award, we expect her second, set in the Himalayas, to be another magical adventure for young readers. Independent bookshops across will be celebrating it as their children’s book of the month for September, too.”22) Confessions of a Bookseller – Shaun Bythell“Booksellers are hugely excited about the paperback release of this memoir by one of their own. Lifting the lid on what it’s really like to be a bookseller in the UK, it’s a must read for anyone who’s ever dreamed of working in a bookshop.”Bookshops across the country will be celebrating Bookshop Day on Saturday October 3.Related... How To Survive A Pandemic, According To These Fictional Characters 9 Classic Books To Read On Your Holiday – Or Staycation We Must Talk Diversity With Our Kids. Here's Where To Start.
4
PUBG, Alipay, Baidu and more exiled India has banned a further 118 Chinese apps, including AliPay, Baidu, and PUBG Mobile, on grounds that they "are engaged in activities which is prejudicial to sovereignty and integrity of India, defence of India, security of state and public order."…
7
The Chinese military has stepped up its training in recent months amid ongoing tensions with the US.
10
Both candidates are "probably going to increase the rhetoric as they head into the election, as that's always the vote winner," Chehab said.
1
Sponsored
The global aerial refueling systems market size is expected to reach USD 719.8 million by 2026 according to a new study by Polaris Market Research.The report “Aerial refueling systems market Share, Size, Trends, Industry Analysis Report By Aircraft Type (Combat & Tanker, Turboprop & Helicopter, UAV), By System (Hose & Drogue, Boom & Receptacle), By Component (Hose, Drogue, Probe, Boom, Refueling Pods, Others), By End User (OE, Aftermarket), By Regions, Segments & Forecast, 2020 – 2026” gives a detailed insight into current market dynamics and provides analysis on future market growth.The aerial refueling systems have evolved over the time and continuous enhancements in technology is perceiving the growth in applications of these systems over the course of time leading to a well-established market in the future.Air-to-air refilling has always been a key enabling factor for air military power as these systems are supporting the combat aircraft and enhancing the capabilities of these aircraft during wartime and other missions.Today’s defense air forces are majorly dependent on air-to-air refilling systems, but on the other hand, aerial refilling for commercial aircraft still seems to be a challenging task.Although, the aviation industry is looking forward to introducing aerial replenishing for long distance flights, the experts and engineers are still pondering upon the successful execution process to accomplish air-to-air refueling for commercial aircraft.Request for sample copy of this report @ https://www.polarismarketresearch.com/industry-analysis/aerial-refueling-systems-market/request-for-sampleIncreasing military expenditure, growing tanker aircraft deliveries, emergence of multi-role tanker aircraft, increasing tanker aircraft fleet globally, and rising demand of long-run military aircraft for special purpose missions are some of the major factors aiding growth of market.Moreover, rising tensions in the world are compelling both the developed and developing economies to prepare themselves by having an advanced fleet of air-to-air fueling tankers to fuel their combat aircraft for covering a longer distance for successfully accomplishing the defense missions.Among end user, OE was estimated to be largest segment in 2019 and is expected to retain its dominance during the forecast period as well.
In the wake of coronavirus thwarting all of our social plans for the foreseeable future, Notting Hill Carnival 2020 is being held as a virtual event for the first time in its 54 year history. This year’s lineup includes virtual panels discussing the political and cultural significance of the carnival and Black Lives Matter merchandise for sale. It is clear we are witnessing a return to the political roots of the festivities. While nothing can match the vibrant energy of dancing through the streets of West London, reverberating sound systems, and a cup of rum punch in tow, the virtual event allows Black British people like me to reflect on a rich legacy of anti-racist activism, something that, this year, seems more important than ever. Notting Hill Carnival is arguably the social event of the summer, attended by nearly two million people, from all walks of life – only eclipsed by the legendary Rio de Janeiro carnival.For Black British people we have to consistently adhere to respectability politics to try avoid discrimination and prove our humanity. Carnival allows us to feel momentarily liberated from the constraints of systemic racism.News reports show uptight police officers being whined on by masqueraders, a true display of British multiculturalism and “tolerance”. The atmosphere is often so joyous that it can be easy to forget the revolutionary struggle that spurred the genesis of carnival, especially given the increasing levels of commercialisation and gentrification of the event.Notting Hill Carnival has a radical history, borne from the race riots between the newly arrived West Indian immigrants, and white working-class Teddy boys in the 1950s. Following the economic and physical destruction of World War II, the British government formally invited Caribbean people to the UK under the British Nationality Act to help rebuild Britain. For people like my grandparents, they were enticed by the promise of greater work opportunities, and picturesque images of the “Mother Country”. Upon arrival, the genteel childhood images of Britain were shattered as they were greeted with racial hostility and violence. Groups such as the White Defence League patrolled the area chanting and defacing property with the slogan “Keep Britain White”, targeting Caribbean households with firebombs or faeces posted through the letterbox. Carnival embodies the fullness of what it means to be Black and British.In 1959, tensions came to a boil and led to a week of disturbances in Notting Hill that spread even as far as Nottingham. Political activist and founder of the first Black British newspaper, The West Indian Gazette, Claudia Jones decided to initiate the first carnival in direct response to the race relations, famously asserting “a people’s art is the genesis of their freedom”.Although many dismiss carnival as just a raucous party with rum and women in feathers, it started as an extremely subversive and radical event borne on plantations across the Americas. There is a great misunderstanding about the ancestral traditions and symbolism present in Notting Hill Carnival. For instance dances such as “whining” (rhythmically gyrating your hips) are frequently referred to as ’sex stimulation.’ However, this is a pre-colonial West and Central African tradition used as fertility dance or to worship deities. Chocolate Nation, a mas band notorious for smearing chocolate and paint on party goers at Notting Hill Carnival also has radical roots. This tradition known as J’ouvert comes from slave revolts in Trinidad and Tobago where enslaved people would cover themselves in oil and mud to avoid being persecuted. In a world where footage of Black people being murdered is normalised, Black joy and celebrating the resilient spirit of our ancestors is one of the most radical things we can do.For Black British people we have to consistently adhere to respectability politics to try avoid discrimination and prove our humanity. Carnival allows us to feel momentarily liberated from the constraints of systemic racism.Because, after all, how far has the Black British community really come since SMS Windrush docked on our shores?The murder of George Floyd by police officers in the United States, and the global coronavirus pandemic have amplified the stark inequalities that still exist within every echelon of our society. A common tactic is to simply deflect and dismiss systemic racism as an “American problem”, but it is undeniable that Britain still has a huge race problem. Whilst I am relieved that we are having these pertinent conversations, it is draining to consistently relive traumatic experiences or, even worse, argue the existence of racism.The only time we see Black people in the media shouldn’t be to just talk about racism. Blackness is so multifaceted, to me it is joy, resilience, delicious food and so much more. Carnival embodies the fullness of what it means to be Black and British. In fact, the virtual nature of carnival this year affords an unprecedented level of accessibility for all Black British people to connect with their culture. For those who are disabled, elderly or live outside of London, it’s an opportunity to join in the celebrations at home. I personally suffer from anxiety triggered by large crowds, and the over policing of carnival and use of kettling techniques can make me feel overwhelmed.Carnival is a space where partying meets the political. In a world where footage of Black people being murdered is normalised, Black joy and celebrating the resilient spirit of our ancestors is one of the most radical things we can do.Maya Elese is a freelance multimedia journalist writing about race, identity and popular culture.Related... 16 Key Events In The History Of Anti-Black Racism In The UK Exclusive: BBC Staff Accuse Corporation Of Being 'Institutionally Racist' Michelle Obama Describes Being 'Invisible' To White People – Even As First Lady 16 Things Black People Want Their White Friends To Know
China launched four medium-range missiles into the South China Sea. The next day, a US Navy destroyer patrolled near islands China claims.
The dispute isn't new, but tensions are rising, and an armed clash between two NATO allies isn't something the alliance or the US has had faced.
1
Around the world, business schools are scrambling to improve their online courses as the COVID-19 pandemic wreaks havoc on an already struggling sector.  Last year, the top 10 business schools in the US reported a 7% decline in applications, and 30% of this year's Harvard Business School candidates have opted to defer their studies until 2021.  One senior academic told Business Insider many schools were struggling to convince students to commit to online learning, adding: "If you're not Harvard Business School, you're f---ed."  Executive education startup Jolt said it had held talks with a number of leading business schools about helping to improve their online offerings.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Business schools around the world are scrambling to improve their online offerings amid fears the COVID-19 pandemic will leave them struggling to attract students.   The executive education sphere was facing an crisis before the pandemic, with the US's top 10 business schools reporting a 7% decline in applications year-on-year in 2019. And while applications have historically risen in times of uncertainty, with students using education to ride out difficult economic circumstances, COVID-19 travel restrictions and social distancing requirements could make 2020 a tough year.  Education providers of all stripes have switched to online learning, and it remains unclear whether institutions will be able to convince students their courses will prove just as enriching when taken from home.  Most business schools have yet to publish stats for the coming fall semester intake, but earlier this year Harvard Business School revealed around 30% of students accepted onto its MBA programme had chosen to defer their studies until the following year.  Applications to the world's oldest business school ESCP, which has campuses in six major cities across Europe, have risen, according to director of executive education Prof Peter Stephenson-Wright — but prospective students remain hesitant to follow through on their commitment. "If anything, the number of applicants is up – and the quality of those applications is incredibly high," he told Business Insider. "But people are quite uncertain about making the final commitment, and some are asking what options they have in terms of deferring enrolment."  Many students are worried they won't get full value from a remote degree. A November analysis by Poets&Quants, a forum and community group targeting business school students, showed the total price tag of an MBA, including room and board and other fees, had ballooned to more than $200,000 at a dozen institutions. "Many [business] schools have relied on their reputation to keep a steady flow of students coming in," the group added. "But a huge part of exec education is the networking opportunities – I don't think people are willing to pay $200,000 for a degree over Zoom."  One senior lecturer at a well-known US business school, who spoke to Business Insider on the condition of anonymity in order to avoid enflaming tensions with colleagues, said the "unreasonable costs" of traditional MBA programmes could put many students off applying to all but the most prestigious institutions. "If you're not Harvard Business School, you're f---ed," they said. Competition was already on the rise before the pandemic broke out, with e-learning companies such as Jolt and Hyper Island offering relatively affordable forms of executive education.  Roei Deutsch, Jolt cofounder and CEO, told Business Insider his firm had held talks with a number of leading business schools across the globe about helping them revamp their online offering.  "There are different models that fit different institutions and challenges," Deutsch said, adding that discussions had included operating an entire "business school as a service" for one university, and white-labelling its tech for another.  Deutsch said the best-known institutions still offered students access to an "elitist club." "That hasn't changed much so they are the most resilient to this crisis. But other schools have recognized that they'll have to completely disrupt themselves to survive. "We'll see some of them flourish and jump up the ranks through inovation, or shut down and lose their spot." SEE ALSO: Before COVID-19, online learning was dying out — but now profits at companies like Udacity are soaring. We spoke to experts about how the pandemic has changed the sector's future. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
The death of George Floyd in May sent shockwaves across the world, and sparked fierce worldwide debate about racism and its ongoing impact on modern society. When I first saw the news, I compartmentalised Floyd’s death as just another episode in America’s ongoing problem with the use of excessive force by law enforcement. Here was a police officer, kneeling on a man gasping his last breaths, lying on hard concrete, and taking the weight of that officer’s body on his neck. Regardless of skin colour, I was appalled on a human level.As the Black Lives Matter movement grew around the world I’ve felt a growing internal tension, and the outcry at Floyd’s death forced me to examine my own past, present and future as a Black man in Britain, and to reflect on my experiences as a Black police officer over more than two decades in the Metropolitan Police Service.My first encounter with police was at the age of six or seven, when my older sister and I ran from our White City estate to call for assistance for my mother during a violent episode with my late stepfather. The police arrived quickly, and quelled the altercation. Even though I had later experiences of being needlessly stopped by uniformed officers, I think this early experience framed my attitude to the police as an institution you can rely on when you seek refuge, as opposed to racist agitators.My mother, full of pride, will tell anyone within earshot that her son is an officer of the law. I grew up in White City Estate and was there until my early twenties. Her pride armoured me to shake off taunts from some sections of the community when I first joined the Met; when kids, white and Black, shouted out “coconut!” or “Babylon!” as I made my way to work, like I was some kind of traitor for joining the ‘Feds’.As a new recruit I never explained my worries to my supervisor about the fact that I had joined the police two years after the Macpherson report had branded the Metropolitan Police Service as being institutionally racist.Who was I a traitor to? Murderers? Rapists? Robbers? Only after moving away did my younger brother reveal the countless violent altercations he used to have on the estate, defending my name. There had always been a tension between police and some sections of the Black community. But now the police have truly become a symbol of oppression to Black inner-city youth and the chants are less subtle: All cops are bastards! Defund the police! No more racist police! As a new recruit I never explained my worries to my supervisor about the fact that I had joined the police two years after the Macpherson report had branded the Metropolitan Police Service as being institutionally racist, or that some family members had warned me against this career for that reason. I remember laughing off an incident where a custody sergeant assumed that I was a criminal when he saw me in custody with a hoodie on, waiting to book in my prisoner. Nor did I challenge an older PC as a young probationer, as to why he suspected that myself and a black colleague were trying to break into my colleague’s car, parked in the police yard. Equally, I wish I had thanked the custody sergeant who insisted on charging the white female suspect who called me the n-word whilst being booking her into custody.In my years as a detective, I moved from quiet acceptance into challenge mode. When a white defence barrister who jokingly asked what special golden path I had taken in life to not find myself in the dock as one of the six Black youths accused of robbery – a case in which I was the lead detective – I explained that I found her lack of social awareness worrying and questioned her suitability as the accused’s defence barrister. She apologised.On another occasion when I was stopped three times in one week in different parts of London driving my girlfriend’s second-hand Rover, I explained to the third officer that if there was a marker on the vehicle that indicated that the driver should be stopped, this should be removed henceforth or I would be forced to submit a complaint. I don’t know whether I was racially profiled, because this was not something that myself or my colleagues practiced when I was in uniform, but I was not stopped on a fourth occasion.I am not writing this piece to try and paper over any cracks. Evidence suggests that there is a disproportionate amount of Black people stopped and searched compared to other ethnicities.I am not writing this piece to try and paper over any cracks. Evidence suggests that there is a disproportionate amount of Black people stopped and searched compared to other ethnicities. There is currently a lack of senior leaders of colour within policing and the representation across all police ranks, of non-white officers is at least 30% short of where it should be in London.Statistics around crime, race and social injustice make for sobering reading too. The highest percentage of victims of crime are Black. The largest proportion of homicide child homicide  victims are Black. Some 40% of prisoners under 18 are Black or of mixed ethnicity. Government ethnicity data states that Black people are most likely to be detained under the Mental Health Act, and the Black African ethnic group had the second lowest rate of home ownership and the highest rate of ‘statutory homelessness’ and drug dependency.During my long career in the Met I have seen officers give life-saving resuscitation to a black boy stabbed during a gang fight, I have worked alongside colleagues who spent the best part of their shift trying to find appropriate housing for Asian victims of honour-based violence, I have led teams in the missing persons unit to trace elderly victims of colour who have found themselves wondering the streets, and I have been part of murder investigation teams where colleagues routinely sacrificed time with their own families to follow a lead or assess reams of CCTV footage in order to find vital evidence to provide justice for Black families. These examples are a microcosm of the work done by police every day to keep all Londoners safe. To focus on stop and search and use the disparity in figures to label the whole organisation as institutionally racist is, in my view, misguided. And those that seek to exploit the tensions between the police and the Black community do so at the expense of the most vulnerable within that community.The truth is, every major social system is failing economically disadvantaged families, and Black families appear to be at the sharpest end. Our education, health, law, employment, social care and prison systems are all culpable – and all roads lead back to the successive governments, of various political persuasions, who have set the tone and provided the funding, or not in some cases. Police should, of course, be held accountable for any failings, and face scrutiny – but that must come as part of a holistic approach which does not demonise the law enforcement personnel whose sole purpose is to protect the community they serve.There has never been a safe space where officers could express their views around ethnic diversity, or have uncomfortable discussions around cultural clashes in the workplace or wider community.Over the past few months, I’ve reflected on the fact that I had never had any in-depth discussions about racial incidents with any of my colleagues or line managers in my 19 years as a police officer. Race was always something discussed at close quarters in hushed meetings, or that resulted in disciplinary action. There has never been a safe space where officers could express their views around ethnic diversity, or have uncomfortable discussions around cultural clashes in the workplace or wider community.But senior police leaders have made clear their ambitions to nurture an environment within the police that is inclusive, that captures all strands of diversity, and where all staff feel more supported in the workplace as well as those in minority groups. And there is extensive pressure to improve police processes that adversely affect certain groups within the community and I know that leaders are responding to this pressure in urgent fashion.Time will tell how effective those measures will be. What is clear is that the UK economy is officially in recession and, post-coronavirus, unemployment is set to escalate. London and the rest of the UK, will need a police force that is ready and willing to take on those challenges. And to be ready, it’s important we have the backing of all its people, from all parts of the community.Rasheed Alawiye is a detective sergeant in the Metropolitan Police Service. He began his career in Islington borough in 2001, where he started as a uniformed police constable before progressing into the Criminal Investigations Department (C.I.D). Between 2010-2015 he worked as a detective in the Homicide Command and moved to his current role based at Scotland Yard in 2018.Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal Black Teens Like Me Have The Future In Our Hands. Here’s What We Must Do With It Black British Women Have Our Own Needs To Be Addressed Right Now. Here’s Why Black Athletes Like Me Are Shaken. Now We Need Support, And We Need Representation
More

Top