Angel Collins

Angel Collins

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Following 44
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Google's Next Billion Users initiative focuses on building products for emerging markets. To illustrate how confusing a smartphone can be for a first-time user, Google made a video game where players try to decipher the meaning. It's called 'Gorm the Zop'. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Gorm the Zop. That's your objective. And if you have no idea what it means, don't worry. You're not supposed to. 'Gorm the Zop' is a game played by employees inside Google Next Billion Users team to understand just how overwhelming a smartphone interface can be for a first-time user.  Google's Next Billion Users, an initiative launched after Sundar Pichai became CEO of Google in 2015, works on building products and services for emerging markets. NBU, which has around 300 core employees and hundreds more across Google's product teams, has been operating in India, Indonesia and Brazil for several years. It also recently started working in Mexico and Nigeria. Projects range from mobile payments – it's found huge success with the Google Pay app in India – to stripping down Google's most popular apps to run on lower-powered smartphones. NBU's team also works on user interfaces and tried to understand how certain iconography does or doesn't translate around the world. To help employees understand why this is important, the team leaders will have employees play the 'Gorm the Zop' game, where they must tap and swipe their way through levels to complete objectives. It's difficult and confusing, and that's the point. "What we were trying to show was, how do we simulate for someone what a new internet user experiences or feels the first time they use a phone?" said Josh Woodward. "If you give someone an interface where the symbols don't make any sense at all, how do they navigate it and what do they do?" And as Googlers invariably mess up along the way, they'll continue to be scolded by messages until they finally crack the code. "We usually call people up in front in all-hands meetings and have them play it in front of their peers," said Woodward.  With the NBU team inside Mountain View unable to travel abroad due to the pandemic, Woodward said they've been  building and using more prototype apps to teach employees how to think like a new internet user. As for Gorm the Zop, Woodward said it is possible to complete the "game" but it's really designed to make a point: just because someone in Mountain View can switch on a smartphone and instantly understand the interface, doesn't mean someone half way across the world will, too.SEE ALSO: A top Wall Street tech analyst says Google is 'less relevant' in e-commerce since the pandemic — and it needs to develop or acquire to start gaining ground on rivals like Amazon Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What makes 'Parasite' so shocking is the twist that happens in a 10-minute sequence
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Finding the perfect product for the perfect price: Here are the best smart displays for your needs.
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The final Fusion left the assembly line on July 31, meaning Ford no longer builds a sedan for America.
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An interesting hot hatch is let down by its dual clutch transmission.
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The SpaceX return time is scheduled for 2:42pm EDT, with the two NASA astronauts on their way, according to the live video.
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Boris is the wise ol’ CEO of TNW who writes a weekly column on everything about being an entrepreneur in tech — from managing stress to embracing awkwardness. You can get his musings straight to your inbox by signing up for his newsletter! It seems that saying ‘I’m busy’ has become a badge of honor these days. If someone asks you whether you’re busy the expectation is that you’ll say ‘Yes, very!’ If you were to reply ‘No, not at all’ that would be cause for concern. You’re not busy? Are you okay? Are you sure? What’s wrong? So what… This story continues at The Next Web
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The House Judiciary Committee has published documents relating to its tech antitrust investigation, including a copy of a conversation between Instagram cofounder and Benchmark investor Matt Cohler. The conversation — which took place in 2012, prior to Facebook's $1 billion acquisition of Instagram — provides a rare glimpse into the mind of a startup founder when a would-be buyer comes calling. You can read the full conversation below, in which Systrom wonders whether Zuckerberg will "go into destroy mode" if Instagram chose to stay independent. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The tech antitrust hearing has revealed a number of surprising pieces of information about the businesses of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. But it's also afforded a peek into the mindset of tech founders, offering a glimpse into some never-before-seen conversations. The House Committee on the Judiciary on Wednesday published documents relating to its antitrust investigation into some of the biggest companies in tech, including a trove of emails between Zuckerberg and employees, as well as messages related to Facebook's business. One such message exchange is between two individuals whose names are redacted, but whom the Judiciary Committee's website identifies as Instagram cofounder Kevin Systrom and Benchmark investor Matt Cohler. The conversation revealed Systrom's mindset at a time when Instagram was will an independent company.  The exchange took place in 2012, before Instagram was acquired by Facebook for $1 billion. While it's only one conversation, it provides a rare look into the mind of a startup founder as he weighs a potential acquisition, including whether Zuckerberg would "go into destroy mode" if Systrom turned down an offer. Read the full conversation between Systrom and Cohler below:  Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What makes 'Parasite' so shocking is the twist that happens in a 10-minute sequence
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(Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia - IIT) An Italian-American research conducted by researchers at the IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) in Rovereto (Italy) and Harvard University in Boston (Usa) explains for the first time the mechanisms used by our brain to recognize specific smells. Thanks to this result, researchers will be able to think about the realization of an artificial sense of smell, to be transferred to robots and other intelligent machines in the future.
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A nearly all-encompassing heat wave has spread across the highest reaches of the globe.
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Researchers collected sediment thousands of feet deep, filtered out bacteria, and revived the cells. But fear not—the destruction of humanity by ancient microbes is not nigh.
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Crystal Gonzalez's Pickaroo raised its first US$5million from the VC arm of local conglomerate Megaworld.
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As India pursues tech self-reliance, Chinese companies are increasingly unwelcome—but can India's tech industry flourish without its neighbor?
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Harry Dunn’s parents have dropped their legal claim against Northamptonshire Police after concluding the force are “absolved of any blame” following their son’s death.The 19-year-old’s family are set for a two-day judicial review hearing at the High Court in November where they allege the foreign secretary “obstructed justice” by allowing suspect Anne Sacoolas to leave the UK.Northamptonshire Police were brought into the legal claim in January as Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles and father Tim Dunn sought to understand how Sacoolas was able to claim diplomatic immunity following the fatal crash in August last year.The PA news agency understands the force will now only be involved in the claim as an “interested party” on the request of chief constable Nick Adderley.It is also understood the force will not seek costs against the family for its involvement in the proceedings.The Dunn family has decided to discontinue proceedings against the police after alleging that documents disclosed for court proceedings demonstrated the force was “kept in the dark” by the Foreign Office (FCO).Recent documents, seen by PA, showed that Northamptonshire Police said it was “not informed” by the FCO of the arrangements that allowed Sacoolas to claim diplomatic immunity.The force also claims the FCO did not tell it about the risk of Sacoolas being withdrawn from the UK or the existence of a waiver in respect of her husband Jonathan’s immunity – preventing officers from interviewing him as a witness.In December last year, Sacoolas was charged with causing Harry’s death by dangerous driving but an extradition request submitted by the Home Office was rejected by US secretary of state Mike Pompeo in January.The US State Department described the decision as “final” but the UK and the US have since agreed to amend the “anomaly” which allowed Sacoolas to claim diplomatic immunity.Explaining why the parents have dropped the claims against Northamptonshire Police, family spokesman Radd Seiger told PA: “Having carefully reviewed the documents disclosed by the Foreign Secretary, the parents are now satisfied that the police are absolved of any blame and could have done no more to ensure that Mrs Sacoolas was brought to justice.“Our case remains that the documents clearly show how the police investigation was effectively stopped in its tracks abruptly when the Foreign Office told the police shortly after Harry died that Mrs Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity.“We say the documents reveal that the Foreign Office kept the police in the dark for 14 days about the uncertainty surrounding Mrs Sacoolas’ claim to immunity.“They failed to tell them that Mrs Sacoolas was planning to leave the country, and then did not tell the police that she had gone until the day after she left.“In the United Kingdom, it is the police’s responsibility to establish who has diplomatic immunity, not the Foreign Office, yet he and his team did just that – the parents say unlawfully.“In discussions with the police, they have now graciously confirmed that they will remain in the legal case as an interested party.”A Northamptonshire Police spokesman said: “This is an ongoing legal matter and it would therefore be inappropriate to comment further at this time.”The Foreign Office have been approached for comment.Related... US And UK Amend ‘Anomaly’ That Allowed Harry Dunn’s Alleged Killer To Claim Immunity Harry Dunn: Dominic Raab Says UK Cannot 'Force' US To Comply With Extradition Order Interpol Issues 'Red Notice' For Arrest Of Harry Dunn's Alleged Killer
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NASA is set to launch its latest Mars mission next week that will put the Mars Perseverance rover on the surface of the Red Planet. Part of getting ready for that launch is to put the nuclear power supply inside the rover. NASA confirmed this week that it installed the multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG) into the rover. NASA confirmed … Continue reading
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A researcher created a machine learning model that creates new lyrics to existing songs, much in the same way that parody singer Weird Al Yankovic does. But the algorithm, dubbed "Weird A.I. Yancovic," has landed creator Mark Riedl in hot water with the record industry, according to a Vice report. Twitter took down one of his videos, which featured the instrumental section of Michael Jackson's "Beat It," after a coalition of major record companies submitted a copyright notice. Riedl is pushing back against the takedown and argues his work is protected by the fair use doctrine. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A researcher has created an algorithm that uses artificial intelligence to create new lyrics "that match the rhyme and syllables schemes of existing songs," per a Vice report published Thursday. Mark Riedl, a researcher at Georgia Tech, told Vice he created his "Weird A.I. Yancovic" algorithm as a personal project. The algorithm's name is inspired by the parody singer Weird Al Yankovic, who does something similar, taking existing songs and creating his own spinoff version with new lyrics. One of his most popular parodies is "White & Nerdy," a take on "Ridin" by rappers Chamillionaire and Krayzie Bone. As Vice notes, however, Yankovic reportedly asks the original artist for permission before creating his parody of a given song. Riedl does not — and it's landed him in hot water. Riedl posted a video to Twitter on May 15 with AI-generated lyrics and the instrumental part of Michael Jackson's "Beat It." On July 14, Twitter took it down after the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, a coalition of some of the record industry's biggest companies, submitted a copyright takedown notice to Twitter, per the report. Coincidentally, Weird Al Yankovic, the parody singer, also created a version of the hit track, entitled "Eat It," in 1984. Other similar AI-generated videos that Riedl has posted to Twitter have stayed up, like a spinoff of Sam Smith and Normani's "Dancing With a Stranger." Riedl told the outlet he thinks his videos are protected by fair use, which is a loophole in copyright laws that allow people to use copyrighted work without obtaining permission beforehand in certain circumstances. The doctrine covers parody work, among other stipulations. "I would argue that my system is generating parody lyrics and that I do not require permission from the copyright holder to publish parody content," Riedl told Vice. "I am not a lawyer, however." Vice spoke with Casey Fiesler, an Information Science professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, who agreed that Riedl's video should be protected under fair use. As Vice explores, the debacle has raised a host of questions pertaining to the intersection of technology and copyright usage, including how algorithm-generated work should be contextualized under fair use and how copyright laws could, or should, evolve to adapt to advancements in technology, like AI. Per the report, Riedl is pushing back against Twitter's takedown of his "Beat It" video and hasn't heard back from the company yet. Read the full report on Vice here.SEE ALSO: Selena Gomez used a mobile 3D scanning 'spaceship on wheels' that trained 200 cameras on her to film her socially distant 'Past Life' music video Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why electric planes haven't taken off yet
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Superior to 3-ply disposable masks, Dallas-based Honest PPE Supply has KN95-Everyday Use face masks for only $1.95 each
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A new scientific study has identified 30 recently active volcanoes on the surface of Venus. The study offers some of the best evidence ever that Venus is still a geologically active planet. The research was conducted by scientists at the University of Maryland and the Institute of geophysics at ETH Zürich. One researcher says that this is the first time … Continue reading
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Snapchat The first of Snap’s new Mini applications rolled out Monday, with tools from meditation app Headspace, part of an initiative “to help support the mental health and emotional wellbeing of Snapchatters,” a Snap spokesperson said in a statement. Snap announced it was launching Minis at its virtual Partner Summit last month. The Minis, as the name suggests, are miniature apps made by third-party developers that run inside of Snapchat to create more social experiences among friends, and they are built using HTML. The Headspace Mini is one of four Snap is launching this week. The others are Let’s Do It, which lets groups make decisions together, Prediction Master from Mammoth Media, which “serves timely questions on everything from the Stock... Continue reading…
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You’re reading The Waugh Zone, our daily politics briefing. Sign up now to get it by email in the evening.Normal people?“A leader is a dealer in hope,” Napoleon once said. Boris Johnson certainly fits that description and his latest plan to liberate the UK from its remaining coronavirus restrictions was stuffed full of optimism. “It is my strong and sincere hope,” he told the No.10 press conference, that the virus will be under such strong control that the country could see “a significant return to normality” from November.The long list of liberations included visiting indoor theatres, football matches, conferences, bigger wedding receptions, you name it. But it was in the Q&A that the PM came out with the most startling ambition of all: “By November at the earliest...it may conceivably be possible to move away from the social distancing measures, from the 1m rule.”Given this wasn’t in his original speech, could Johnson have been freelancing again, riffing from the script as his innate enthusiasm for positive news overtook him, and the science? Well, the new ‘Next Chapter’ paper makes clear that “removing the need to distance people” would only be considered if prevalence of the Covid-19 “falls very significantly”. That sombrero covid curve needs to be not just squashed but totally flat, it appears.Was the PM deluding himself, or the nation? Funnily enough, chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance and chief medical officer Chris Whitty weren’t on hand to give an instant verdict (will we ever again see the ‘Three Amigos’ on the same platform?) But it didn’t take long, as within hours both men were telling the Lords science committee just how crucial social distancing would be for the foreseeable future.“The reality is distancing remains an important part of this mix,” Whitty said. “It has not gone away. [They] need to continue for a long period of time.” Vallance added that “social distancing and hygiene measures will be necessary” given it was “highly likely” the virus would return. In fact, he stressed it was just a matter of when, not if, covid “comes back in force” in several waves.And that’s where the new blueprint actually seems to contradict itself. It talks about total liberation from November at the earliest, but then adds the government is preparing to be “as ready as possible for the risk of a resurgence in the virus between November and March”.It suggests that even if the “optimal scenario” doesn’t happen, “we hope [that word again] we will see a return towards normality in spring 2021”. As it happened, a new Sage paper out today warned it is not possible “to return to a ‘pre-Covid’ normality”, without almost impossible levels of contact tracing and covid security effectiveness.The last unlockdown strategy paper published in May actually said that “hope is not a plan”. But there seems to be a lot of finger-crossing in the latest blueprint. Perhaps the most optimistic is the assertion buried within it that “we will introduce an app” that could allow digital contact tracing. More concrete was a plan to introduce “backward” contact tracing for any particular outbreak, seen by many as long overdue.No Johnson announcement is complete without a new target these days (we are a long way from his claim in May that he was “forbidden from announcing any more targets and deadlines”) and his aim for a daily antigen testing capacity of half a million tests by the end of October was a big new ambition. That does fit however with Vallance’s own warning that such a scale of testing was vital to cope with both flu and covid symptoms.The emphasis on test and trace will be welcomed by many, though there are still real problems with the current scheme failing to contact nearly a quarter of people who test positive. Although Matt Hancock has long refused to rule out compulsion, I understand that such a drastic step simply will not happen.‌Forcing compliance with the system is seen as a major deterrent to the vulnerable groups who are most likely to get the virus, and there are fears it would mean more people just don’t take a test when they get symptoms - a nightmare scenario for all of us.So instead of the stick, the carrot is being considered. Special financial support for people hit by local outbreaks is now “on the table”. Labour’s Keir Starmer and Plaid Cymru Westminster leader Liz Savile-Roberts have been pushing for extra cash help and with the PM’s focus now on local lockdowns as the main weapon against the virus, maybe he is listening.Everyone will be hoping the UK does indeed achieve the best case scenario set out today, but the PM is undeniably taking a gamble. The prize is him finally getting a grip of the crisis and making the country more resilient for the inevitable second wave. If he gets any bit of it wrong, he will have to reimpose restrictions and take the political damage. A new poll analysis by Peter Kellner today suggests Red Wall voters have already moved back to Labour.All that talk about “planning for the worst” but hoping for the best, will be keenly tested this winter. The problem is that each day he looks more distant from his scientific advisers, the more personal the political risk becomes. But judging by today, it looks like Johnson has adopted one more Napoleonic motto: “If you want a thing done well, do it yourself.”Quote Of The Day“He’s congenitally incapable of seeing a problem without making it very considerably worse.”John Bercow rubs salt into Chris Grayling’s ISC woundsFriday Cheat SheetCouncils in England will get new powers from Saturday to force owners to shut pubs, cafes, shops and restaurants in areas hit by coronavirus outbreaks.Boris Johnson backed off moves to tell those working at home to go into work, saying it would be up to employers and staff to discuss the issue.Theatres said that they were still unlikely to reopen from August 1 as social distancing would make the move unviable.Matt Hancock ordered an urgent review of how Public Health England compiles its daily count of Covid-19 deaths after Oxford University academics highlighted that its figures record deaths of anyone who has previously tested positive for coronavirus.Captain Tom Moore has been knighted by the Queen for his outstanding achievement of raising almost £33m for the NHS.Work and pensions secretary Therese Coffey told the BBC that speculation about a cabinet reshuffle this autumn risks “disrupting” the work of her department.What I’m ReadingThe Adults In The Room: How The Treasury Tackled Covid - New StatesmanGot A Tip?Send tips, stories, quotes, pics, plugs or gossip to [email protected] Subscribe To Commons PeopleEach week, the HuffPost UK Politics team unpack the biggest stories from Westminster and beyond. Search for Commons People wherever you listen to podcasts and subscribe.Related... Government Scientists Cast Doubt On PM's Drive For Normality By November Boris Johnson Scraps 'Work From Home' Coronavirus Advice From August 1 Coronavirus Lockdown Lifting Timetable: Here's When Things Will Reopen In England
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“We cannot at this moment precisely quantify the delay.”
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It’s been predicted that the edge market is headed for strong growth over the next few years.
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It seems that Huawei is doing well despite the US sanctions. It is hard to come up with such a number of problems that the ... The post Despite the US ban, Huawei has reported revenue growth in the first half of 2020 appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Though the show’s well into jumping the shark territory at this point, creator Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa says that this story isn’t quite over.
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AT&T has announced it’s switched on its low-band 5G network in 28 new regions, including some with Dynamic Spectrum Sharing (DSS) technology. The new regions bring AT&T’s total coverage to 355 areas, estimated to be available for around 179 million people. Here is the complete list of new regions switched on this week: Arkansas 1.... Read more » The post AT&T deploys low-band 5G in 28 new regions, including some with Dynamic Spectrum Sharing appeared first on Telecoms Tech News.
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Motorola’s Moto RAZR 2019 event is later today – but first, a giant leak!Today we’re taking a peek at the foldable-display Moto Razr 2019, a device that’s been a very long time coming.Motorola’s “Moto Razr” 2019 just appeared in a listing on the FCC, complete with photos of the front, back, sides, and even under the hood.Generally we don’t get to see this much of a phone in advance of its official unveiling from its maker.But today, it would appear that someone’s done a bit of a mess-up.Someone messed up between the FCC’s testing and the listing of said tests online.
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It’s another sign that investors believe that competitive gaming will eventually outgrow traditional sports.The fund is called the Artist Esports Edge Fund, and it is aimed at getting institutional investors a chance to reap some of the potential rewards of esports investments.Artist Capital Management takes a “theme-driven approach” to investment research.First, the audience for esports is large (380 million unique viewers in 2018), according to market researcher Newzoo.It is global and it is “demographically advantaged” (79% of viewers are under age 35) and growing.Second, Artist Capital Management believes that esports revenue — at $900 million in 2018 — has significant potential to expand in comparison to traditional sports leagues, with the NFL alone generating over $16 billion of revenue in 2018.
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After years of behind-the-scenes planning and decision making, it appears Tesla has decided where it will build its European Gigafactory.According to reported comments from CEO Elon Musk, the electric-car maker will build the factory in Germany.Electrek first reported on the news Tuesday and cited comments Musk made at a Golden Wheel automotive award ceremony.There, he reportedly said Tesla chose the "Berlin area" for what he called Gigafactory 4; the Tesla boss also said there are plans for an engineering and design center.Roadshow reached out to Tesla to confirm the news Musk shared but the company did not immediately respond.However, Musk has since tweeted a supportive message that seemingly follows his comments.
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The wreck of World War II submarine USS Grayback has been discovered off Japan 75 years after its sinking by a Japanese bomber.In a statement translated from Japanese, the Lost 52 Project explained that the USS Grayback (SS-208) is the first U.S. submarine discovered off the coast of Japan.Japanese records indicate that the sub was sunk by a 500-pound bomb dropped by a naval bomber in February 1944.The sub’s deck gun was located 384 feet away.In the statement, Lost 52 Project founder Tim Taylor described the discovery as “absolutely amazing.” The sub is ranked the 20th most successful U.S. submarine of World War II, according to the Lost 52 Project.During 10 war patrols, it sank 14 enemy vessels, including Japanese submarines, totaling 63,835 tons of shipping.
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A vulnerability that was discovered on the macOS version of Apple Mail is compromising the security of supposedly encrypted messages, but Apple said a fix is on the way.The flaw, which was shared by Apple-focused IT specialist Bob Gendler, was found on the four most recent MacOS releases, namely Catalina, Mojave, High Sierra, and Sierra.He found macOS database files that include information from Apple Mail, which is then utilized by digital assistant Siri to make suggestions.Unfortunately, one of the files, named snippets.db, is storing the unencrypted text of the emails.Only a small number of people are affected by the issue.The user needs to be sending encrypted emails from Apple Mail on macOS Sierra to macOS Catalina, with FileVault not activated to encrypt the entire system.
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As the Chief Security Architect at Red Hat, Mike Bursell spends his days talking about security both inside and outside the company.His job, he tells us on the sidelines of the Open Source Summit Europe 2019 in Lyon, France, is to encourage people to think about security.Talking about the security challenges in today’s containerised world, Mike says that there’s more to containers than just the technology and people miss that it’s a cultural change: “It's very easy to forget that security isn't just about runtime.It's about development time and test time and provisioning time and closing down containers.”His advice to people is to follow the age-old rule and think about security right from the design stage: “If you're doing DevOps for doing agile methodology, you can't wait for two weeks before you deploy to put security in because you deploy every two weeks, for instance.So you need to make it a part of the cycle.”
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