Anthony Couture

Anthony Couture

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UK
Agent Tesla continues to evolve and new modules now allow the malware to steal credentials from popular apps.
China
A few days ago, Lei Jun’s speech in honor of Xiaomi’s 10th anniversary has aroused industry attention. Lei Jun will talk about where Xiaomi comes ... The post 10 Years Of Xiaomi: It May Disappear As Fast As Came appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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You can clear the cache on Disney Plus if you're having trouble watching Disney Plus and you've ruled out a bad internet connection.  Clearing the cache on Disney Plus can be done through your internet browser, or through the app. The steps to clear the cache for Disney Plus will vary depending upon what kind of device you are using.  Visit Business Insider's Tech Reference library for more stories. Disney Plus should run error-free most of the time. If you find that the app is not working properly, though — perhaps the video continuously buffers or stutters — you should check your internet connection to see if it's the cause. But if other video streaming services work just fine, you might need to reset or clear the app's cache of temporary files.  If you're watching Disney Plus in a web browser, you can clear the browser's cache. On other devices, the process to clear the cache may be a little different. Check out the products mentioned in this article: Disney Plus monthly subscription (from $6.99 a month at Disney) Samsung 50-inch Smart TV (from $399.99 at Best Buy) iPhone 11 (from $699.99 at Apple) Samsung Galaxy S10 (from $699.99 at Walmart) Sony Playstation 4 Pro (from $359.99 at Game Stop) Xbox One S (from $392.80 at Amazon) Xbox One X (from $539.92 at Amazon) How to clear the cache on Disney Plus using Chrome 1. Click the three-dot menu at the top right of the screen.  2. In the menu, click "More tools" and then choose "Clear browsing data…" 3. In the "Time range" drop-down menu, click "All time." Then check the option for "Cached images and files."  4. Click "Clear data." How to clear the cache on Disney Plus using Firefox 1. Click the "History and Saved Bookmarks" menu button in the toolbar. It looks like a set of books on a shelf. 2. Click "History" and then "Clear Recent History…" 3. In the "Clear Recent History" window, click the dropdown menu for "Time range to clear" and then choose "Everything." Make sure "Cache" is checked, and then hit "OK."  How to clear the cache on Disney Plus using Safari 1. In the menu bar at the top of your screen, click "Safari." 2. Click "Preferences." 3. In the "Preferences" window, click the "Privacy tab" and then "Manage Website Data…" 4. Select "Remove All."  How to clear the cache on Disney Plus using an Android phone or Android TV The exact steps to get to the Disney Plus cache settings may vary slightly depending on which Android device you are using, but this should get you there: 1. Start the "Settings" app on your device.  2. Tap "Apps" and scroll down until you see Disney Plus in the list of apps installed on your phone or TV. Tap it. 3. Select "Storage" and then "Clear cache" at the bottom of the screen.  How to clear the cache on Disney Plus on Chromecast built-in TVs If your TV has Chromecast capability built into it, then follow these steps to clear the cache. If you are using a Chromecast device that's plugged into your TV, follow the steps for clearing the cache on your Android or iPhone mobile device.  1. From the home screen on your Chromecast built-in TV, open "Settings." 2. Select "Apps," and then select "Chromecast built-in." 3. Select "Clear data" and hit "OK." 4. Click "Clear cache" and then select "OK." 5. Then, restart your TV. How to clear the cache on Disney Plus using an iPhone, iPad, or Apple TV If you are watching Disney Plus on an iOS device like an iPhone or Apple TV, you can't clear the cache for a specific app like Disney Plus. Instead, you might be able to resolve a problem with the cache by deleting the Disney Plus app and then reinstalling it.  If you have an iPhone or iPad, delete the app by following the steps in How to uninstall apps on your iPhone. If you have an Apple TV, check out the steps in How to delete apps on an Apple TV, or hide them. After removing Disney Plus, reinstall it from the App Store and sign back into your account.  How to clear the cache on Disney Plus on a PlayStation 4 1. Select "Settings" in the Dashboard.  2. Choose "Storage," then "System Storage," and then select "Saved Data."  3. Choose "Disney Plus" and then press the "Options" button. 4. Select "Delete."  How to clear the cache on Disney Plus on an Xbox One 1. Select "My Games and Apps" on the "Home" menu.   2. Select "Apps."  3. Select the "Disney Plus" tile, then press the "Menu" button on your controller to see "More Options." 4. Select "Manage App" and then clear the saved data. Related coverage from Tech Reference: How to get Disney Plus on your Xbox One by downloading it from the Microsoft Store How to get Disney Plus on your Roku device, and watch Disney's new streaming service with a free 7-day trial How to get Disney Plus on your Apple TV, by subscribing to the streaming service and downloading the app How to turn off language subtitles on the Disney Plus app on your streaming device 'How many profiles does Disney Plus allow?': What you need to know about the number of Disney Plus profiles you can create, and how to add or customize them SEE ALSO: The best media streaming sticks and devices Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How 'white savior' films like 'The Help' and 'Green Book' hurt Hollywood
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Learn how to use Google's cloud storage service. Here's our in-depth guide to its various useful functions.
China
Back in December 2019, Xiaomi announced its new flagship, Redmi K30 5G under its Redmi sub-brand. At the time of release, this smartphone has 6GB ... The post Redmi K30 5G gets its largest-ever price cut – get a $100 discount appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The Samsung Galaxy Watch 3 improves on the original Galaxy Watch in almost every way... except for its huge price. Here's how both stellar smartwatches stack up.
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I want to watch more new movie releases in the comfort of my own home. Way more.
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Samurai Jack: Battle Through Time, The Last Campfire, World's End Club and Next Stop Nowhere are listed as "coming soon" in iOS 14.
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Over the past half century, workers' wages have stagnated, their rights have been eroded, and whistleblowers have faced frequent retaliation for calling attention to the problems. But in the tech industry, a new alliance of workers from warehouses to cubicles — bolstered by the pandemic and anti-racism protests — is speaking with a louder and more unified voice than ever. They're demanding everything from better pay and workplace protections to a bigger say over how the products they build are designed and put to use. Business Insider spoke to 14 tech organizers and labor experts about what obstacles the movement faces as well as the changes they'd like to see in American workplaces to empower workers once again. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. All is not well for workers in Silicon Valley. Amid a devastating pandemic that has left millions of Americans jobless, the four largest US tech companies blew past Wall Street's expectations, reporting quarterly earnings that pushed their combined net worth past $5 trillion and boosted their CEOs' personal fortunes by billions. But as the tech industry soared to unprecedented heights, many of the workers fueling its rise have seen their wages and benefits stagnate, grueling job environments have become more dangerous, and efforts to call attention to workplace inequities have been met with retaliation. Despite this, the tide is shifting. Last week, the top executives of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google faced a grilling from lawmakers that focused on their companies' outsized power. Over the past few years, the experiences of rank-and-file employees have become increasingly at odds with those of the wealthy executives at the top — both on the job and in how they see their employers' impact on society. Bolstered by the pandemic and sweeping protests against systemic racism, tech workers from warehouses to corporate office buildings have been speaking up with a unified voice for the first time. Their demands: Better pay, benefits, and working conditions. But there's a broader agenda in place. They want to shift the balance of power at their organizations so they can have more control over how their work gets done, how products are built, and who their companies do business with. And now they're inspiring others across the country to do the same at their own workplaces. Business Insider spoke with 14 tech organizers and labor experts who said the industry has reached an inflection point and that things aren't going back to the way they were before. Here are their thoughts on how to empower workers once again and the obstacles that still lie ahead. Chris Smalls — organizer and former Amazon warehouse worker What's the biggest obstacle workers face: Smalls said Amazon and other companies' self-interest and antagonism toward workers continues to jeopardize their safety. "Everything [Amazon's] doing doesn't benefit the employees, everything they're doing benefits the company and the company only," he said adding that companies like Amazon "smear the lower class people, they intimidate the working class people." How can we improve American workplaces: Amazon needs to be taxed and workers need better pay, Smalls said. "You're telling me at $25 an hour I'm working for the richest man in the world and I'm capped out," he said, referring to the salary limit he hit after five years with the company. What organizers should focus on now: "What we need is for the families who actually lost somebody [to COVID-19] to actually come out to the public," Smalls said. Concerns about coronavirus exposure were raised as early as March and he said Amazon's response fell short. "This could have been prevented ... somebody needs to be held accountable." Oriana Leckert — former Kickstarter outreach team member and organizer for the Kickstarter United employee union What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "There's a strain of individualism that runs through tech for sure, Leckert said. Convincing workers who have good jobs now to organize on behalf of their coworkers — and their future selves — can be challenging at times, she said. How can we improve American workplaces: Leckert said companies should start "listening to workers and giving the people who are doing the work some more influence over how and when and why the work gets done." Executives should trust their employees to have good ideas instead of dictating everything via "opaque, top-down hierarchical management," she said. What organizers should focus on now: "Talk to everybody in your workplace, talk to everybody outside of your workplace. Get advice from other folks," Leckert said. "There are lots of people who are having a struggle at the same time and who have done it before," she said, and people looking to organize at their workplaces can learn from others' efforts. Grace Reckers — organizer at the Office and Professional Employees International Union What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "The lack of hardened geographic bounds is an important component of the tech organizing movement, and it mirrors the structures of the tech companies themselves," Reckers said. "Unlike nurse unions that represent RNs in a few distinct hospitals, typically in one region or city, organizers in the tech industry have to take into account the growing number of remote workers, international employees, contract workers, and vendors that are all affiliated with their companies." How can we improve American workplaces: "The biggest change I would like to see is for workers to have unobstructed rights to form unions at their workplaces," she said. "Employers need to be swiftly disciplined and employees need to be reinstated when organizers are fired in retaliation for their union activity. I also believe that the amount of money companies spend on anti-union consultants and 'union avoidance' law firms should be publicized, called out, and eventually redistributed to workers' paychecks." What organizers should focus on now: "Going forward, I imagine that the remnants of these fears around job security will remain for a lot of workers in the tech industry. My hope is that employees will continue to organize around these issues and recognize that as long as you are an at-will employee, you can be fired for any reason or no reason at all—without any guarantee of severance pay or continued healthcare coverage. It's only with a union contract that workers have the right to negotiate terminations and the safety nets that come with them." Laurence Berland — organizer and former Google engineer What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "In the pandemic, with so many out of work, a lot of people might have the attitude they are lucky to even have a job," Berland said. "But workers should remember that despite high unemployment, their experience and institutional knowledge is valuable, and not so easily replaced by a new hire, especially if they act collectively." How can we improve American workplaces: Berland said people need to fight for coworkers "across class and roles," especially those who have to work in person or whose jobs are jeopardized by the remote work surge during the pandemic. "Workers who are able to work from home need to fight for those workers and stand in solidarity with them," he said. What organizers should focus on now: "Make those connections with the most vulnerable workers — the Black and Brown essential workers, the unemployed service workers. Ask them what you can do to be a part of what they need," Berland said. "They know what they need and if you are genuinely showing up for them, they will tell you exactly what they need. Listen to them." Jacinta Gonzalez — organizer at Mijente What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "Office tech workers are recognizing that their technologies are inherently political and are never 'race neutral,'" Gonzalez said, pointing to the growing surveillance state and "the insidious relationship between tech corporations and law enforcement." Gonzalez said that at companies like Google and Microsoft, "tech workers have made clear demands that all contracts with law enforcement be dropped, a necessary and long overdue step." How can we improve American workplaces: Gonzalez said that "while office tech workers today may not be underpaid, they are recognizing that the cushy benefits they currently receive does not mean they have a voice in the types of technologies and contracts their companies engage with, even if workers recognize that their technologies are harmful." She added that giving workers more power would create "more accountability within the companies creating the technologies that are actively harming Black and Brown communities."  What organizers should focus on now: "The revolving door between government contractors and corporations must end and the curtain must be pulled back to reveal the full impacts of the growing surveillance state," she said. "As Naomi Klein said on a recent Mijente panel with Edward Snowden, we have a right to live illegible lives. It is time for technology to be transparent, human focused and end the growing surveillance and ownership of our data."  Wesley McEnany — organizer at the Service Employees International Union Local 1984 What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "Workers are seeing the use of their labor for immoral or unethical reasons as cause to organize because these issues are fundamentally working conditions as much as wages or benefits are," McEnany said. "These are also workers, especially at the big 5, who potentially hold a lot of structural power." How can we improve American workplaces: "Tech companies have a serious responsibility to end systemic and structural racism. They are uniquely positioned to use technology for good and lead on issues of diversity and inclusion." What organizers should focus on now: To make money, tech firms are incentivized to "take on nefarious projects, whether it's facial recognition software for oppressed governmental agencies or upgrading the technological infrastructure of local police departments surveilling Black Lives Matter activists," McEnany said. "[Tech companies] aren't going to be moral institutions without worker input." Dania Rajendra — director of Athena, a coalition of activists and Amazon workers What's the biggest obstacle workers face: The "sheer size and utter disregard for transparency or accountability" of companies like Amazon lets them get away with mistreating workers, Rajendra said. "Amazon's outsized power and its impunity about wielding it is the obstacle." How can we improve American workplaces: Rajendra said she'd like to see "more elected officials — at every level — start to use their investigative and regulatory power to prioritize everyday people." She pointed to France, where a court ruled in April that Amazon wasn't doing enough to protect workers and would have to shut down or take stronger precautions. What organizers should focus on now: "We'll continue to see more bridges built between the issues workers deal with on the job and the issues people — including those very same workers — deal with in their communities," Rajendra said. "Both COVID and the uprising [against systemic racism] expose the fact that the risks working people face on the job don't just end at the warehouse exits." Ben Gwin — data analyst at HCL Technologies and organizer for the United HCL Workers of Pittsburgh What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "Corporate-friendly labor laws," Gwin said. "Companies would rather pay lawyers and union busters, break the law, and pay a fine than honor workers' rights to organize and bargain in good faith." How can we improve American workplaces: "Medicare for All," Gwin said. Nearly half of Americans get health insurance through their employers, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, and the pandemic has shown gaping flaws in the US' approach. A study from Health Management Associates said 35 million could lose coverage due to layoffs. What organizers should focus on now: Gwin said a change in the White House is needed before things improve for workers. Under Trump, the National Labor Relations Board, the top federal agency tasked with protecting workers, "is awful, and we need at least nominally pro-labor appointees in there," he added. Nicole Moore — Lyft driver and volunteer organizer for Rideshare Drivers United What's the biggest obstacle workers face: For gig workers, Moore said the biggest challenge is not having the same rights and labor protections as employees. "If we want safe industries where people aren't dying to put a box on your porch, people aren't becoming homeless as they buy a new car so they can drive you and anybody else with an app around, then we have to put these basic things in place," she said. How can we improve American workplaces: "We need to see a reform of labor law that makes that easier for groups of workers to organize," Moore said. Workers should be able to band together to negotiate contracts that guarantee fair wages, she said, "so that when you wake up in the morning, you know what kind of money you're going to make, it's not going to change overnight." What organizers should focus on now: Moore said she's focused on getting "fair pay and a voice on the job, more PPE for drivers, and "somebody in the White House who actually is going to have a Labor Department that's worried about the welfare of workers, not just how much profit companies can make off of them." Y-Vonne Hutchinson — CEO and founder of ReadySet and cofounder of Black Tech For Black LIves What's the biggest obstacle workers face: While "a lot of people are waking up to the reality of racism in the tech sector and racism in this country," said Hutchinson, "there are still people who are invested in keeping things the same who are going to push back, and we have to be prepared to face those people." How can we improve American workplaces: "When it comes to anti-racism, we do need to hold people accountable," Hutchinson said. "People don't change their behavior if they're not incentivized to change their behavior." She said employees who serve on diversity and inclusion committees and managers who hire, promote, or mentor diverse workers should be rewarded, not forced to sacrifice their work toward these goals in order to accomplish others. What organizers should focus on now: Within tech, Hutchinson said Black Tech For Black Lives wants to "make sure that Black people are hired and promoted and supported and really able to thrive" in a way she said hasn't happened so far, even as companies have said they want more diversity and inclusion. Steve Smith — communications director at the California Labor Federation What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "Tech CEOs have become very adept at employing anti-union strategies to crush organizing," Smith said. While executives' opposition to unions isn't new, Smith said the difference now is that tech companies have "some of the wealthiest and most powerful CEOs on the planet with vast resources to fight organizing at their disposal." How can we improve American workplaces: Companies need to follow existing labor laws, Smith said. "Provide workers with the basic protections and pay they deserve." What organizers should focus on now: Smith, who works closely with rideshare and food delivery drivers, said they're focused on defeating Proposition 22, a California ballot measure backed by Uber, Lyft, DoorDash, Instacart, and Postmates, that would permanently make drivers independent contractors. If it passes, Smith said it will hurt drivers "who have few basic protections" as well as "small businesses who are at a competitive advantage when these large tech companies cheat the system." Erin Hatton — associate professor of sociology at the University of Buffalo What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "Labor movements — like all social movements — require an incredible amount of work," Hatton said. Keeping up the momentum while trying to support families, survive a pandemic, and fight for civil rights will be "a Herculean task" for workers, she said. How can we improve American workplaces: Hatton said "all workers who perform labor from which others profit" should be covered by all labor and employment laws, not be forced to work in unsafe work environments, and should be protected from "coercion and abuse" by their employers. That includes diverse groups such as "Uber drivers, student athletes, incarcerated workers, graduate students, Instacart drivers, meatpacking workers, grocery store workers, and doctors and nurses," she said. What organizers should focus on now: Worker rights as well as basic civil rights for Black people, immigrants, and transgender people should be top priorities, Hatton said. "As a country, as a democracy, and as an economy, we are only as strong as our most vulnerable population." Clair Brown — professor of economics at the University of California Berkeley What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "Right now the problem is at the national level," Brown said. "The Department of Labor was set up to speak for workers, to protect workers, to represent workers. And right now it doesn't. Right now, it really represents employers under Trump." How can we improve American workplaces: Brown said unemployment programs in the US should look more like those in Europe, which "focus less on payments directly to individuals once they're thrown out of work" and instead on "how can we actually pay to keep them on the job." What organizers should focus on now: "We have to get back to this question of: 'what kind of social safety net do we want to provide people in the United States?'" Brown said workers who are laid off or can't work have no way to "just basically get through life, pay their mortgage or their rent, pay their health insurance, pay their kids' bills." Tom Kochan — professor of management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology What's the biggest obstacle workers face: "Employer opposition, and that hasn't changed at all," Kochan said. "Any employer that wants to defeat a union organizing campaign can do so because the penalties are so weak and so slow to be enforced." How can we improve American workplaces: "We have to open up our labor law to new forms" in order to give workers more voice, Kochan said. That could include creating works councils or putting rank-and-file employees on corporate boards, "not to control it, but to bring a worker's perspective to these issues and the knowledge and the information that workers can bring." What organizers should focus on now: Kochan said the upcoming election will have huge implications for workers. "If we get a change in government, both in the presidency and in the Congress, then we are going to see a massive debate around the future of work and how we learn from this crisis and fill the holes in the safety net that have been temporarily filled."
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Talk about a Buzz kill.Toward the end of Toy Story 3, viewers everywhere were traumatised when their favorite lovable toys slid toward an incinerator and were nearly destroyed. The toys were saved at the last minute, but what would’ve happened if they hadn’t been? Would they have died? Would their spirits have gone to the great (infinity and) beyond? Well, that very “childhood-ruining debate” (as Uproxx called it) went viral over the weekend, with a Twitter user wondering if the toys in Toy Story could die.my girlfriend and i are having a big fight bc i think the toys from Toy Story are immortal and she thinks they can die— mustard clown (@markydoodoo) August 2, 2020Twitter users tackled the topic from all angles. One person argued that toys are “immortal” but not “invincible,” another said that toys can’t die a “total death,” and yet another suggested that if you “chopped off woody’s head ... and put it far far away from his body where no one could put it back on... he must be dead.”So what’s the truth? Lee Unkrich, who directed Toy Story 3, came across the debate and offered his own definitive answer.Unkrich said that toys “live as long as they exist.” However, if they were to be “utterly destroyed,” it’d be “game over.”They live as long as they exist. But if they were to be utterly destroyed? Say, in an incinerator? Game over. https://t.co/p9nwIAjAl8— Lee Unkrich (@leeunkrich) August 2, 2020Dang, Woody. Remember when all you had to worry about was a snake in your boot?Although Woody, Buzz and the gang avoid the ultimate fate in Toy Story 3, at least one edit of the movie didn’t end that way.Previously, Unkrich and Coco writer and director Adrian Molina, who was a storyboard artist on Toy Story 3, told us about a version of the film where the toys didn’t escape the incinerator. Thankfully, that edit was made as a joke, and it wasn’t — as Unkrich might say (perhaps in the voice of Jigsaw from the Saw movies) — “game over.”READ MORE: Disney+ Tried To Use CGI To Edit Daryl Hannah's Bum Out Of Splash... And It Did Not Go Well How The Little Mermaid Found A Place In The Hearts Of LGBTQ Fans 30 Things You Probably Missed In Disney's The Little Mermaid
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One of the most significant challenges facing scientists and researchers around the world as humankind looks to send crews on deep space missions is how to protect them from radiation. Space radiation can be a significant challenge and pose a risk to astronauts inside spacecraft. A group of researchers has made an interesting discovery on advanced passive radiation protection system … Continue reading
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This Spectre TV could be used as a digital signage solution or DIY interactive kiosk.
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Ireland launched its contact-tracing app on July 7, and within a week it had 1.3 million downloads — roughly 37% of the country's adult population. NearForm, the company which built the app for Ireland's health authority, has donated its code to an open-source project. Other countries and US states have already asked permission to retool the app for themselves, and NearForm confirmed to Business Insider it's started work with Pennsylvania authorities. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Ireland's COVID-19 contact tracing app has been so successful that officials from other countries, including the US, want to use it. Ireland's app, which launched on July 7, and is called COVID Tracker, was developed by a software company called NearForm. It reached 1.3 million downloads in its first week, roughly 37% of people in Ireland over 16 years old. A day after the app launched, NearForm's CEO Cian Ó Maidín tweeted the company had found "a solution for contact tracing for governments. The NearForm team can get a national contact tracing system launched in one month." On July 20, NearForm and Ireland's health authority, the Health Service Executive (HSE), donated the code to an open-source project called the Linux Foundation Public Health Initiative.  Governments have taken note. "There are a number of other countries and states in the US talking to our vendor about reskinning the app and utilising that," Fran Thompson, chief information officer at the HSE, said in a statement. NearForm confirmed to Business Insider on Tuesday that Pennsylvania is one of the US states that came calling. State officials have started work with NearForm, the company said. Colm Harte, NearForm's technical director, told Business Insider that NearForm has held talks with officials in the UK, which has yet to launch a contact-tracing app it promised would roll out nationally in May. "There has been a lot of collaboration and co-operation between different countries including the UK, I have had some conversations with some of their technical teams to talk through how we set up our system, and how we've approached using the Gapple API, that sort of stuff," he said.  COVID Tracker uses the API released by Apple and Google in May (sometimes known as the Gapple API), and sends out Bluetooth signals that look for other phones with the app downloaded. These signals allow the phones to keep a record of other nearby devices — if one user tests positive for the virus, HSE asks them to upload their log, and others users are alerted through the app. While 37% is good penetration compared to contact-tracing apps in other countries, questions remain about whether the download rate will tail off, and whether the app will be effective in curbing the spread of the virus. While other countries, including the UK, have said contact-tracing apps need to reach roughly 60% of the population to be effective, NearForm and the HSE do not have a target for how many people they want to download COVID Tracker. "There is no such target figure. Any impact this has is beneficial, so if breaks even a handful of transmission chains it's been of benefit," Harte told Business Insider. Thompson added that the app has "already picked up some positive cases." "Some of those were contacts that were not provided through manual contact tracing. These are people we would never have picked up."Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why YETI coolers are so expensive
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The global digital landscape is still evolving rapidly as we enter the second half of 2020, with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic continuing to influence and reshape various aspects of people’s daily lives.  Lockdowns may have been lifted across across the world, but many of the new digital behaviors that people adopted during confinement have endured, resulting in meaningful increases in various kinds of digital activity. For context, Akamai reports that global internet traffic has grown by as much as 30% this year, while research from GlobalWebIndex shows that we’re still spending considerably more time using connected tech than we were… This story continues at The Next Web
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The first Arab interplanetary mission is now on its way through space.
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You have to hurry to win this "immortal" Netflix account.
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If you absolutely positively must have Microsoft's productivity suite, this is one of the best deals to date.
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Here's all the meaty bits you need to know about Ford's amazing new Jeep Wrangler fighter.
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See how Gmail is merging with most of the other G Suite apps.
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Image by Alex Castro / The Verge Microsoft is warning of a 17-year-old critical Windows DNS Server vulnerability that the company has classified as “wormable.” Such a flaw could allow attackers to create special malware that remotely executes code on Windows servers and creates malicious DNS queries that could even eventually lead to a company’s infrastructure being breached. “Wormable vulnerabilities have the potential to spread via malware between vulnerable computers without user interaction,” explains Mechele Gruhn,  a principal security program manager at Microsoft. “Windows DNS Server is a core networking component. While this vulnerability is not currently known to be used in active attacks, it is essential that customers apply Windows updates to address this... Continue reading…
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Soon, Lenovo Legion will become part of the gaming smartphone segment. We already know for sure that it, together with Asus ROG Phone 3, will ... The post More details about Lenovo Legion gaming smartphone has appeared appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Qualcomm has become the latest high-profile backer of Reliance Jio Platforms, which has raised more than $15.7 billion in the past 12 weeks from as many investors.
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Huawei is to offer cash bonuses and double salaries to employees as a reward for mitigating the impact of its US blacklisting, according to reports.The Chinese company has been frozen out of the US device and telecoms equipment markets for several years, and earlier this year was effectively blacklisted by Washington on national security grounds.The ruling limited Huawei’s access to components and meant its handsets would no longer receive updates for the Android operating system from Google or access to its popular applications.Everything you need to knowUS has 'no evidence' for Huawei claimsHuawei has long said to have had a contingency plan for such an event and has sought to bring as much development in-house as possible over the past few years.
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Thankfully we’re here to make sure you catch all of the action at today’s game as we’ll show you how to get a Falcons vs Saints live stream regardless of where in the world you are.Calling the Falcons an underdog would almost be an understatement as the team is going into today’s game 1-7.Can the Saints continue their six game winning streak or will the team choke against their biggest rival?See our guide to discover how to stream every single NFL game liveWatch the Falcons vs Saints game online from outside your country (or in a blackout)Watching this game from the US, UK, Canada or Australia?
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She also explained why finishing in fifth place is not to be looked down on.HuffPost is part of Verizon Media.Verizon Media and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.Verizon Media will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.Select 'OK' to continue and allow Verizon Media and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.
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T-Mobile really wants to get the public in favor of the merger between it and Sprint.The company announced that if the merger with Sprint goes through, it will offer 10 years of free, unlimited 5G service to first responders.The program will reportedly be called the “Connecting Heroes Initiative,” and is part of a larger “5G for Good” plan that the company hopes to build.Through the program, State and local public first responders can sign up to receive coverage.Those agencies can actually sign up right now, and will get the coverage if the merger closes in the next year.“First responders are under more pressure than ever before.
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China has been warned to avoid the same mistakes with blockchain that it made with its peer-to-peer lending, as the government vowed a “thorough revamping” of the controversial lending platforms as part of a continuing battle against financial risk amid the domestic economic slowdown and the trade war with the US.A specially designated task force is in the process of working towards eliminating risks associated with P2P online lending platforms, the official Xinhua News Agency reported at the weekend, citing a task force statement.The task force has been created in response to a series of online lending platform collapses that trapped the savings of millions of individuals who sought financial gain by lending through the platforms, with the resulting public uproar posing a severe challenge to the nation’s social stability.Ezubao, once China’s biggest P2P lending platform, folded in 2016, having collected 59.8 billion yuan (US$8.5 billion) from more than 900,000 investors.But with interest in blockchain – the technology that underlies Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, many of which are still banned in China – on the rise after it was endorsed by President Xi Jinping at the end of last month, the government have been urged to take a more cautious approach following the expensive lessons learned from P2P platforms.“The government should not blindly push [technology speculation fever] nor should it simply close them down when problems emerge.”
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Adobe, Twitter, and The New York Times Company have announced a new system for adding attribution to photos and other content.A tool will record who created a piece of content and whether it’s been modified by someone else, then let other people and platforms check that data.Adobe showed off a prototype in Photoshop today, but many of the details are still in flux, and there’s no release date.The overall project is called the Content Authenticity Initiative, and its participants will hold a summit on the system in the next few months.Based on what Adobe has announced, the attribution tool is a piece of metadata that can be attached to a file.Adobe doesn’t describe precisely how it will keep the tag secure or prevent someone from copying the content in a way that strips it out.
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At its annual hardware event last month, Google unveiled the Nest Mini as well as the Nest Wifi Router and Nest Wifi Point.The former went on sale for $49 on October 22 while the latter goes on sale today starting at $269 for a two-pack and $349 for a three-pack.Unlike their predecessors, Google Wifi and Google Home Mini respectively, these devices come with a dedicated machine learning (ML) chip.Specs and features are identicalSpec-wise, the Nest Mini and the Nest Wifi Point are the same: a quad-core 64-bit ARM CPU (1.4 GHz) with an ML hardware engine.“From a hardware perspective the specs that that generate and drive this system are the same,” Mark Spates, Google’s lead product manager for smart speakers, told VentureBeat.
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Visit Palm Springs and you’ll find stars of all kinds—be they luminous points in the dark night sky or classic haunts and hotels that radiate glimmers of Ol’ Blue Eyes and his Rat Pack crew.Beginning each summer, senior editor Robert Klara oversees the process of meticulously curating a lengthy list of Brand Genius nominees whose marketing efforts over the past 18 months were not only ambitious and impactful but also measurable.Once again, Adweek’s editors had their hands full selecting this year’s class of 10 Brand Genius Award winners, each of whom boasts an array of remarkable accomplishments across a variety of categories including telecom, video and apparel.Inside, you’ll see why we’re celebrating everything from AT’s stellar storytelling efforts led by chief brand officer Fiona Carter to Amazon Studios’ resurrection of the Carnegie Deli for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, overseen by Mike Benson, formerly head of marketing (now president, CMO at CBS).The Brand Genius Award winners will share the spotlight this week with our Brand Save honoree Stand Up to Cancer and its co-founders, Rusty Robertson and Sue Schwartz—we’re proud to present the esteemed charitable foundation with our philanthropic award.Read on to learn how SU2C has done an outstanding job of increasing awareness about cancer prevention and accelerating the pace of cancer research and treatment.
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