Billy Clark

Billy Clark

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Following 38
UK
After years of build up, the first part of Final Fantasy VII Remake released earlier this year. While it probably won’t be surprising to learn that the remake was a success given that the original game is lauded as one of the best RPGs ever made, today we’re finding out just how big of a success it is. As announced … Continue reading
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(Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) Researchers in Lásló Forró's lab at EPFL, Switzerland, are working on a membrane made of titanium oxide nanowires, similar in appearance to filter paper but with antibacterial and antiviral properties. Their material works by using the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide: when exposed to ultraviolet radiation, the fibers convert resident moisture into oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, which have the ability to destroy pathogens.
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Publisher hopes its high-quality paper box can lead to a “domino effect of change.”
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Match Group's second quarter 2020 earnings report shows more people using online dating apps since COVID-19 hit. Match Group owns popular online dating apps including Tinder, OKCupid, Match, and Plenty of Fish. Apps have rolled out virtual dating options, while some have also been accused of encouraging people to break social distancing orders. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Online dating is what people do when everything else has been cancelled, it seems. Match Group's second quarter 2020 earnings report shows an increase in subscribers and downloads over pre-COVID-19 levels, and users are back to paying for membership at the same level they were before.  Match Group's more than 45 dating brands include some of the most popular, like Tinder, Hinge, Match, and OKCupid. According to Apptopia, Match controls over 60% of the dating app market. As shelter in place and stay at home orders shut down most parts of social life, people apparently turned to online dating to fill the gap, leading to the 15% increase in new subscribers Match reported over the quarter. Tinder is the most popular of the company's dating apps, and saw a large increase in users during a time when business has been down in most sectors. Tinder tried to get ahead of the virus and possible snafus related to meeting up with strangers. Back in March, Tinder added a popup message warning users to practice basic precautions like hand washing and maintaining social distance. "Your wellbeing is our #1 priority," the message read, linking to the World Health Organization for more information. Despite these messages of caution, the goal of dating apps is to bring people together in real life, a potentially tough sell during a deadly pandemic. In May, Business Insider reported on dating app users trying to convince others to violate social distancing. Some dating apps, including those owned by Match Group, launched new features for safer dating in a pandemic. Hinge released "Date from Home," Plenty of Fish added a livestreaming feature, and Tinder later added a video dating feature. Match says some of its apps, especially on Plenty of Fish, are seeing "healthy adoption." Possibly most surprising, and most promising for Match Group, average revenue per user (ARPU) rebounded and even surpassed pre-coronavirus levels. April was a low spot, but ARPU has steadily increased since, despite the economic crisis. Match ended the quarter with 10 million subscribers, 6 million of which are Tinder users. SEE ALSO: These sealed individual work pods with air purifiers show what returning to the office could look like Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Leslie Odom, Jr.'s $500,000 gamble that led to a starring role in 'Hamilton'
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Samsung is expected to announce Galaxy A51 5G in the USA soon and before we take a breather, a new benchmark listing suggests that a ... The post Samsung Galaxy A42 appears, could have Snapdragon 690 appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Microsoft confirmed the company is exploring a deal to buy TikTok's operations in several countries including the US. President Donald Trump has threatened to ban the app over concerns including national security. Those concerns could affect Microsoft's bid. White House trade adviser Peter Navarro on Monday questioned Microsoft's relationship with China, suggesting the company should divest its Chinese holdings. China is home to Microsoft's largest R&D center outside the US, and its ties to the country run deep, Chinese technology entrepreneurship expert Duncan Clark said. Are you a Microsoft employee? Contact this reporter via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-425-344-8242) or email ([email protected]). Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Microsoft's ties to China will be under the microscope as the company attempts to purchase viral video app TikTok's operations in several countries including the US from Chinese parent company ByteDance. Microsoft on Sunday confirmed its interest in TikTok, disclosing CEO Satya Nadella has had discussions about the bid with President Donald Trump, who has threatened to ban the app in the United States over concerns including national security. White House trade adviser Peter Navarro on Monday questioned Microsoft's relationship with China, suggesting the company should divest its holdings in the country. Navarro said that the Chinese government and military are Microsoft customers, but it was unclear if he was calling on the company to stop doing business there entirely.  What is clear: Microsoft's connections to China run deep, and its dealings in the country could be a big part of the discussion as the company tries to negotiate its TikTok purchase amid the Trump administration's escalating tensions with China. Microsoft declined to comment for this story. Microsoft does more research and development in China than anywhere outside the US. Microsoft's has had a long presence in and close connections with China, Duncan Clark, an expert on Chinese technology entrepreneurship, told Business Insider. Then-CEO Bill Gates first opened an office in Beijing, China in 1992. Microsoft China now has more than 6,000 employees, and the company does more research and development in China than anywhere else outside the US. The links between Microsoft and China have been strained of late. As Microsoft President Brad Smith late year wrote the US and China are on the brink of what he called a "tech Cold War," and earlier this year revealed Microsoft gets just 1.8% of its global sales from China, which in turn accounts for 18% of the world population. But Microsoft is also perhaps the "least controversial" large, foreign tech company operating in China, Clark said. Google, for example, pulled out of China many years ago, unwilling to censor its search engine in compliance with local regulations — and, years later, found itself embroiled in controversy when it was revealed that it was working on Project Dragonfly, a censored search engine that would allow it to return to China. Google said in 2019 that Project Dragonfly was no longer in the works.  Microsoft, by contrast, has been operating a censored version of Bing in China, almost uninterrupted for the last several years. Similarly, Microsoft offers its Azure cloud platform in the country in partnership with a local Chinese operator. 'Links are much tighter than people think' When Chinese President Xi Jinping made his first visit to the US, he first stopped in Seattle and met with technology-industry CEOs including Microsoft's Satya Nadella and visited Microsoft's headquarters. China's previous president, President Hu Jintao, had dinner at Gates' house in 2006. Microsoft has long been a "training ground" for Chinese technologists, Clark said, and technology and engineering graduates from top Chinese universities often aspire to work in Redmond.  Microsoft also funded a technology-industry graduate school near its Seattle-area headquarters called the Global Innovation Exchange, a partnership between Seattle's University of Washington and Tsinghua University, often called "China's MIT." Microsoft President Brad Smith personally helped to broker the partnership. Many Microsoft alumni run top Chinese companies. ByteDance's own founder Zhang Yiming had a brief stint at Microsoft, Bin Lin worked for Microsoft for nearly a dozen years before becoming president and cofounder of Chinese electronics giant Xiaomi, and former executive Qi Lu – who used to be Satya Nadella's supervisor and was a candidate for his job – was chief operating officer of Chinese tech giant Baidu until 2018. "Links are much tighter than people think," Clark said. "Those conversations are pretty easily had." Got a tip? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message her on Twitter @ashannstew, or send her a secure message through Signal at 425-344-8242.SEE ALSO: If Microsoft buys TikTok, it could be hailed as a 'hero' for saving the app as President Trump threatens to ban it. Here's why analysts say a deal might make sense. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's what it's like to travel during the coronavirus outbreak
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In early March, The Tory Burch Foundation hosted its Embrace Action 2020 Summit, which saw leaders and entrepreneurs from around the world gather to talk about gender parity and inclusion in the workforce.  At the Summit, Bank of America COO Thomas Montag spoke with former AOL CEO Steve Case, Goldman Sachs Partner Dina Powell, and Tory Burch about how their companies aimed to create a more inclusive industry.  Diane von Furstenberg also spoke at the conference, as did Gloria Steinem, former co-CEO of Ariel Investments Mellody Hobson, and activist-model Halima Aden. Yasmin Green, director of research and development for Jigsaw, an internal tech incubator within Google parent company Alphabet, spoke about the role human bias plays when programming artificial intelligence.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The Tory Burch Foundation Summit in early March was a gathering of some of the most prominent executives and entrepreneurs in the world.  Bank of America COO Thomas Montag former AOL CEO Steve Case, and Dina Powell McCormick, partner and member of the Management Committee at Goldman Sachs, were a few of the execs who spoke about how they sought to make their companies more inclusive. A prominent theme throughout the conference was gender parity in the workplace. "The word 'ambition' takes on a completely different meaning when applied to a woman than when applied to a man," Burch told Business Insider. "Women are criticized for exhibiting the exact same quality men are praised for. This has to change. We do that by shining a light on unconscious gender bias, which was the focus of our Summit." Yasmin Green, director of research and development at Jigsaw, a unit of Google parent company Alphabet, spoke about one particularly complex hurdle in modern society: the difficulty of programming artificial intelligence without bias. The problem with training AI on humans, Green said, is that humans are biased, and when the data that feeds AI is biased, then the AI becomes biased itself.  "Are we content with algorithms that reflect back to us the way the world works?" Green detailed an experiment that demonstrated this unconscious bias in AI. She and her team created the same fake professional profile for a woman and a man and browsed online job sites as each of these imaginary people. In the end, they found that men were five times as likely to see ads for higher-paying jobs than women.  This, she said, was because women believe they must fulfill 100% of the requirements before they apply to a job, whereas men believe they only need to meet at least 60% of the requirements before they apply to the job.  "So at the same skill level, we [women] are clicking on jobs that are less senior and less well paid," Green said. "But if we click that way, then the internet is going to learn and that's what we're going to see."  Green cited another example, in which she and her team had trained an AI model to pick up on hate speech on social media. After a few trials, their AI model began to flag the sentence, "I am a proud gay man," as a hate sentence.  Green said this was because they trained the AI model by using millions of example sentences that humans wrote on the internet, and most sentences and comments that contained the word "gay" were negative — 80% of them, in fact. Therefore, the AI model Green's team experimented with took this data and learned to associate the term "gay" with something negative and hateful.  "I ask myself how can I raise my daughters to make good decisions in life, [and] to be more compassionate and less prejudiced than the world around them," Green said at the conference. "The question for us — are we content with algorithms that reflect back to us the way the world works?"  To help prevent situations like this and lessen the bias in AI, Green said social justice activism needs to be expanded to include algorithm. She also noted the importance of having diverse representation in AI programming.  "It's not enough just to automate human behavior," she said. "We need to make sure that what's reflected back to us in algorithms is something that's better than we are."SEE ALSO: Alicia Keys is partnering with American Express on 'The Ambition Project' to empower women. Here's how it will expand their access to senior positions — and already has. DON'T MISS: There are zero black women leading Fortune 500 companies right now. Here's how company culture can be sculpted to change that. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
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Cloud-based digital locker Movies Anywhere has launched its new co-viewing experience for all users amid months of beta testing its Screen Pass feature. With this new feature, which is called Watch Together, Movies Anywhere users are able to watch a digital streaming show with their friends and family even if they’re located in a different part of the country. The … Continue reading
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Methanol in hand sanitizers is a health hazard, the FDA says. Make sure the products you buy don't have it.
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Boasting best-yet specs and ratings, these bring features that enthusiasts missed with the EOS R and EOS RP.
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"Cursed" and "The Last Dance" are some of the most popular shows on Netflix this week.  Netflix introduced daily top lists of the most popular titles on the streaming service in February. Streaming search engine Reelgood keeps track of the lists and provides Business Insider with a rundown of the week's most popular TV shows on Netflix. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. When "The Last Dance" aired earlier this year, it was ESPN's most watched documentary ever. Now the Michael Jordan docuseries is a hit on Netflix, too. Netflix introduced daily top 10 lists of its most viewed movies and TV shows in February (it counts a view if an account watches at least two minutes of a title). Every week, the streaming search engine Reelgood compiles for Business Insider a list of which TV shows have been most prominent on Netflix's daily lists that week.  Netflix's new fantasy series "Cursed," starring "13 Reasons Why" actress Katherine Langford, topped the list this week. Below are Netflix's 9 most popular TV shows of the week in the US: SEE ALSO: The top 9 movies on Netflix this week, from 'Fatal Affair' to 'The Old Guard' 9. "In the Dark" (The CW, 2019-present) Description: "A blind woman with vices finds herself in the middle of a murder investigation when her best friend turns up dead." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 73% What critics said: "The show's entire treatment of blindness comes across as a regressive curiosity made all the more frustrating by the amount of time the show spends humiliating Murphy in the early episodes." — Hollywood Reporter (season 1) 8. "Fear City: New York vs. the Mafia" (Netflix original, 2020) Description: "Five Mafia families ruled New York with a bloody fist in the 1970s and '80s, until a group of federal agents tried the unthinkable: taking them down." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 71% What critics said: "It can be a little dry at times, but it's an easy watch, a reminder of how dedicated professionals and breakthroughs in technology can change law and order." — RogerEbert.com (season 1) 7. "Indian Matchmaking" (Netflix original, 2020-present) Description: "Matchmaker Sima Taparia guides clients in the U.S. and India in the arranged marriage process, offering an inside look at the custom in a modern era." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 86% What critics said: "Indian Matchmaking is a delight. It opens up a glimpse into a world that a lot of us only know by its worst aspects." — Deadline (season 1) 6. "The Business of Drugs" (Netflix original, 2020) Description: "To understand the origins and true impact of the business of drugs, a former CIA analyst investigates the economics of six illicit substances." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: N/A What critics said: "Settles into the nitty-gritty of the ins and outs of the cocaine trade, tosses in a few op-ed assertions, a handful of whopper statistics and some fascinating firsthand accounts." — Decider  5. "Unsolved Mysteries" (Netflix original, 2020-present) Description: "Real cases of perplexing disappearances, shocking murders and paranormal encounters fuel this gripping revival of the iconic documentary series." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 74% What critics said: "The fact that the show is back is great, but it needs to do something to situate itself as 'Unsolved Mysteries' and not another quasi-HBO documentary series. Change can be good, but sometimes you shouldn't mess with what has already worked." — Indiewire (season 1) 4. "The Last Dance" (ESPN, 2020) Description: "This docuseries chronicles the rise of superstar Michael Jordan and the 1990s Chicago Bulls, with unaired footage from an unforgettable 1997-98 season." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 96% What critics said: "Serves as an education, a reintroduction, and a spiritual reunion for one of the great basketball teams of all time. It is as farcically self-involved as it sounds, but how else would one capture Jordan's singular, single-minded essence?" — The Atlantic 3. "Dark Desire" (Netflix original, 2020-present) Description: "Married Alma spends a fateful weekend away from home that ignites passion, ends in tragedy and leads her to question the truth about those close to her." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: N/A What critics said: N/A   2. "Down to Earth with Zac Efron" (Netflix original, 2020-present) Description: "Actor Zac Efron journeys around the world with wellness expert Darin Olien in a travel show that explores healthy, sustainable ways to live." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 57% What critics said: "The series is meant to focus on environmentalism, but it's all over the place — and not in a good way." — Cosmopolitan (season 1) 1. "Cursed" (Netflix original, 2020-present) Description: "Armed with mysterious powers and a legendary sword, young rebel Nimue joins forces with charming mercenary Arthur on a mission to save her people." Rotten Tomatoes critic score: 73% What critics said: "What gives Cursed its edge is the source material, which subverts centuries of lore and oppressive systems. The Netflix adaptation isn't nearly as captivating, but it still manages to be a quaint escape from reality." — AV Club (season 1)
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The startup has informed its staff that it won't be able to pay salaries beyond July 30.
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Realme is about to launch a new series of smartphones in China, starting with the Realme V5 which brings a design refresh.
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Coronavirus has changed everything. Make sense of it all with the Waugh Zone, our evening politics briefing. Sign up now.Ministers have been urged to boost mental health support amid claims Rishi Sunak’s coronavirus bailout failed to reach people struggling with the financial fallout of the pandemic. The chancellor was told on Wednesday that gaps in his emergency wages package - known as the furlough scheme, introduced in March - excluded more than a million people from government help. MPs said Sunak has “effectively drawn a line” under aiding more than a million people after Covid-19 hit the UK, due to government small-print and special terms. Now, a letter sent by the Lib Dems to Sunak and the health secretary Matt Hancock, call on the government to step up mental health services to support those on the bread line. Jamie Stone, a Lib Dem MP and chairman of the all-party parliamentary group for Excluded UK - a group representing a coalition of campaigners including freelancers and those unable to claim support because of childcare - said: “The terrible financial pressure on the millions excluded from financial support is putting tremendous strain on people’s mental health.“We need action now, not just to support this group financially, but to support the mental health of those affected.“We are calling on the government to increase funding for mental health support for all groups affected by this pandemic, not least those who are burdened by significant debt.” Pressure continues to build on Sunak to extend the Covid-19 support package to a number of groups not covered by the furlough scheme. Chairman of the Commons’ Treasury select committee, Mel Stride, has stressed that more than a million people have not received support from the government and called on the chancellor to “do whatever it takes” to protect people and businesses.In a letter, Sunak admitted to MPs on the committee that it “is correct that some people have not been eligible” for furlough or self-employment scheme funding, while others, such as PAYE freelancers, do not have a specific scheme.However, the chancellor defended the scheme and said that these “were the right policies for the first phase of the crisis”.Sunak also said that the Treasury was unable to allow returns for the 2019-20 tax year to be used by people to secure self-employment support as that would create an opportunity for an “organised criminal gang to file fake or misleading returns to claim the grant”.In response, Stride said: “The chancellor has effectively drawn a line under helping the million-plus people who have been excluded from support for four months.“Despite stating that he will not pick winners and losers when it comes to sectors and businesses that need support, the chancellor has done this when it comes to households and individuals.“The chancellor said that the schemes were designed to be open and accessible to as many people as possible, but the committee remains to be convinced that more people could not have been helped.“The chancellor initially told those at risk of losing their livelihoods that they would not be forgotten.“While the government is clear that it is moving on to the next phase of its recovery plan, it cannot just turn its back on those who are suffering.” The committee continues to urge the government to rethink its position. Related... Care Workers Have Toiled On The Covid Frontline – This Is How We Repay Them Pay Rise For 900,000 Public Sector Staff – But Social Care Workers Left Out Spending Watchdog Urged To Probe Gove's £5bn PPE Contracts
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Just 2 weeks ahead of launch, Samsung's Galaxy Note 20 and Note 20 Ultra have seemingly been revealed in all their glory.
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In October 2019, an extensive report two years in the making placed the US and the UK first and second respectively in a global ranking of countries’ pandemic preparedness.Even more impressively, Britain led the world in a sub-section on a country’s ability to respond rapidly and halt the spread of of devastating diseases.Nine months late, the US and the UK have been crippled both physically and economically by coronavirus. So what went wrong?In short, everyone did what they were supposed to when Covid-19 hit – except the politicians.The reportThe Global Health Security (GHS) Index was the most comprehensive global study on pandemic preparedness to date. It was a collaboration between the John Hopkins University, The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) and the Nuclear Health Initiative (NTI).Its results were relatively unsurprising – wealthier countries tend to be better prepared than poor ones.The report did not go unnoticed – here’s a picture of President Trump waving the very same chart around at a press briefing at the White House back in February, while assuring his country that all would be well.Five months later and 140,000 Americans have died of coronavirusThe scoresOverall, the US and the UK topped the chart, scoring 83.5 and 77.9 respectively – but the conclusion of the report was sobering.“No country is fully prepared for epidemics or pandemics,” it read. “Collectively, international preparedness is weak.”Still, a few months later – and certainly in February, when Trump was touting America’s score in the survey – the findings suggested both countries would fare better than most as the pandemic progressed.The realityAs you will no doubt be aware, the US and the UK are two of the hardest hit countries in the world.The subsectionsKey to understanding this massive discrepancy is how the GHS Index was compiled.Jessica Bell, NTI’s co-lead on the project, told HuffPost UK: ”[The report] measures six categories and in each we drill down into 140 questions. We examine data that speaks to legislation, regulations, plans, academic publications and things of that nature.“It was years in the making.”In those six subsections, the UK’s score varied wildly.The planningIn those subsections that looked at planning for a pandemic, the UK scored highly – successive governments for years have compiled, maintained. and updated national plans on how to cope specifically with influenza pandemics.Academics, think tanks and health bodies all did what was required of them and contributed to plans that were in place in case the worst happened.In 2011 the Department of Health published the “influenza pandemic preparedness strategy”, was updated regularly and remained the go-to document when coronavirus struck.The GHS Index highlighted this in its third subsection, titled “rapid response to and mitigation of the spread of an epidemic”.Explaining what they examined, Priya Bapat of the EIU told HuffPost UK: “So, do you have these emergency plans in place and do they cover lots of different types of diseases?“Do they incorporate planning for vulnerable populations? We looked at exercising response plans, so – you have these plans on paper but, in the last year, have you actually tested them out in a scenario planning exercise?“Do they have a plan on how to communicate with the public?”When it came to the UK, the answers were “yes, yes, yes and yes” and it scored 91.9 out of 100, more than 10 points ahead of any other country.The implementationBut the UK didn’t score quite so well on subsection six, which looked at how well a country can actually implement the plans it has.“Six looks at aspects that aren’t traditionally looked at like the strength of the government and social economic risks and infrastructure,” said Bapat.“And if you look at the UK, some of the areas where it scored lower have been the story of this outbreak. One aspect in particular – when you look at high income European countries, the UK has the lowest doctors per capita than any of those countries except for Poland.“There’s been huge underinvestment in the NHS and that’s shown itself in the number of health care workers per capita.”This underinvestment has of course been thanks to a decade of austerity under a Conservative government. But this still can’t explain why the UK has so far fared worse than countries with inferior healthcare systems – like Vietnam, for example.To explain that we have to look to our political leaders.The leadership The UK had the plans, so why didn’t they work?“Even though the US and the UK had the best environments in terms of plans in place and thinking about what they would need in terms of capacity,” said Bapat, “when it came to the moment that everyone had been preparing for, the decision-making really hampered the actual ability of the country to respond.”Documenting the UK government’s delayed response to the pandemic is an ongoing process but there are already a number of things the public inquiry that Boris Johnson committed to last week might want to examine.The nationwide lockdown was by some accounts too late and “cost a lot of lives”; face masks in shops are only being made mandatory on July 24 after months of dithering; contact tracing has been discussed endlessly but is still not up and running; and quarantine rules have changed like the seasons.Then there’s the way the government has let down Black, Asian and minority ethnic people, who have been worse hit by coronavirus than their white counterparts despite repeated warnings being sounded. That has already been the subject of a review, but it was heavily criticised for containing little new information and making no recommendations.Asked about the biggest factor in the current situations facing both the UK and the US, Bell said: “If I was going to put my finger on any one large influencer, it would be the political leadership.”
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Tomorrow, OnePlus will make many people’s dream come true. We mean those who like phones from this brand but can’t afford themselves to acquire it, ... The post OnePlus Nord To Use Google Duo, Calls and Text Messaging App appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Luality made it look easy, all while cosplaying Tifa Lockhart to boot
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It seeks to calm people down after rumors claimed pre-orders were imminent
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The bad old days of slow, bloated Android skins are long gone... or are they?
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“Better-than-GPU performance at a fraction of the cost”Intel has pulled the curtain back on its latest Movidius VPU (Vision Processing Unit)- a type of processor designed to accelerate machine learning and artificial intelligence tasks, particularly ones like image processing.Dubbed “Keem Bay”, the hardware is the latest iteration of its Vision Processing Unit from subsidiary Movidius, which according to Intel’s early testing will offer quadruple the throughput of Nvidia’s TX2 SOC, at one-third less power.(Based on ResNet-50 benchmark inference measurement INF8).The 72-millimeter chip features a new on-die memory architecture with 64-bit memory bandwidth, Intel said at its AI conference in San Francisco this week.Intel’s Internet of Things (IoT) VP Jonathan Ballon claimed: “It’ll deliver better-than-GPU performance at a fraction of the power, a fraction of the size, and fraction of the cost of comparable products”, as the company ramps up its AI offering.
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This is a fantastic time to find cheap TV sales with price cuts from Walmart, Amazon, Best Buy, and more.We've tracked down the best TV deals from brands like Samsung, LG, Vizio, Sony, and more.To help guide you through the best selection of cheap TVs we think are worthy of your time.You'll find massive discounts on 4K TVs in different sizes and prices.You'll also find savings on TVs that are powered by streaming services like the Fire TV and Roku experience which are fantastic ways to enjoy a huge range of optional streaming services.We'll continue to update this page with new deals as we find them in the latest TV sales, so you can spend less time shopping, confident that you're going to find the best TV prices on this one page.
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Walmart's Black Friday early access sale is still going strong with deep discounts on best-selling items.The retail giant is dropping new price cuts every day, and today's new deals include Samsung 4K TVs.You can save up to 40% off on a wide range of Samsung TVs that start at just $227.99.Our top Walmart TV deal is the Samsung 65-inch 4K UHD Smart TV that's on sale for $477.99.The 65-inch TV features smart capabilities, so you can stream your favorite movies and TV shows all in one place using the Samsung remote.You can also control other smart home devices from your TV by downloading the SmartThings app.
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Red Dead Redemption 2 only just released for PC, and the game is encountering a host of technical issues, but that hasn’t stopped the modding scene from already creating custom content for the game’s story mode.These range from graphical enhancements to design overhauls for the main character — and you’ll want to take a look even if you’ve already played through the game on PlayStation 4 or Xbox One.On RDR2Mods, players are able to rate and sort user-created content for the game, and it’s split into categories based on things like weapons, transport, maps, and the player-character.One such mod is for Arthur Morgan, who can be transformed into the Joker.It’s a nod to the shared first name of Arthur Morgan and Joker’s main character, Arthur Fleck, who is played by Joaquin Phoenix in the 2019 film.The introductory chapter in Red Dead Redemption 2 does a great job of establishing the setting and its cast of characters, but it also moves at a snail’s pace.
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After nearly five years as the leader of the Tiobe index of programming language popularity, Java is now in a virtual dead heat with C. C trails Java by a mere fraction of a percent, according to the Tiobe Index of November 2019.While Java is still ranked number one, with a rating of 16.246 percent, C is right behind it at 16.037 percent, a difference of just .209 percentage points.Tiobe reasons that C’s fortunes are on the upswing because of its use in Internet of Things development.The company speculates that C could have the number one ranking by the end of the year.Java has held Tiobe’s top spot since April 2015.Elsewhere in the Tiobe rankings, the Apple-developed Swift language continued to outpace its predecessor, Objective-C.
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During its annual Ignite conference, Microsoft previewed a new Office 365 service which uses advanced AI to deliver greater insights and expertise to businesses using data gleaned from their own content.The software giant's new knowledge-management service is codenamed 'Project Cortex” and it is also the first new service in Microsoft 365 since the launch of Microsoft Teams in 2017.The goal of Project Cortex is to help organize businesses' content that is accessible in SharePoint and make it available to users in a proactive way.According to Microsoft, Project Cortex can turn customers' content into “an interactive knowledge repository”.The service is able to ingest content in a number of ways including analyzing documents and contacts but subject-matter experts can also teach the system how to better understand less structured content including information gathered from conversations, meetings and videos.New topic pages and knowledge centers will be created and updated by Project Cortex and these will essentially act like wikis for organizations.
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The hunt for dark energy has gained a new weapon, with the first test of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) being completed recently.DESI is installed atop the Nicholas U. Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory outside Tucson, Arizona and will search for evidence of the mysterious energy which makes up 68% of the universe and speeds up its expansion.“After a decade in planning and R, installation and assembly, we are delighted that DESI can soon begin its quest to unravel the mystery of dark energy,” DESI Director Michael Levi of the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory said in a statement.“Most of the universe’s matter and energy are dark and unknown, and next-generation experiments like DESI are our best bet for unraveling these mysteries.I am thrilled to see this new experiment come to life.”To compile the first image shown above, DESI used its 5000 spectroscopic “eyes” which peer out into the night sky.
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Audio company JBL has introduced a new personalization option that allows buyers to have their favorite image printed on the grill of the speaker they’re purchasing.The personalized result is very photo-realistic, though with the obvious grille effect added into the mix.The same personalization is also available for headphones, though limited to text and select designs.Personalizing products is a great way to make them feel unique, but doing so usually requires third-party services and vinyl cutouts.Buyers wanting something a bit more immediate and permanent on their new speaker or headphones can take JBL up on its direct personalization feature, which is available on the JBL Flip 5, Live 650BTNC, Clip 3, and Go 2.Buyers can choose to have an image, text, or a design printed on the speaker grille; the headphones are slightly more limited, only supporting some custom designs and text, but no photo printing.
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