Brad Patterson

Brad Patterson

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Following 45
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Looking for exciting single-player games to play? Here are our favorites, from Fallout to Marvel's Spider-Man.
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Make the most of your time indoors with a daily dose of celebrity news and guides to the best shows. Sign up to the entertainment newsletter.Kate Garraway has revealed how Jeremy Kyle has stepped in to help as her husband Derek Draper continues to be treated for the effects of Covid-19.The former host of The Jeremy Kyle Show, which was axed last year, gave Kate the use of his driver to take the couple’s children, Billy and Darcey, to their grandparent’s home after she put stringent safety measures in place to keep them all safe.Speaking on Monday’s Good Morning Britain, Kate said: “My children for the first time are staying away from home. They’ve gone to stay with Derek’s mum and dad.“They’ve been shielding since the beginning of March because they both feel vulnerable so this is a very big deal to have the children stay.“One of the things we did was plan over several weeks what to do. They isolated the days before they needed to travel. I washed and packed clothes and sealed them.“They travelled up not with me, because they’ve not even had contact with Derek’s sisters, so I didn’t want to be an extra person coming into their lives.“So thanks to Jeremy Kyle they travelled up because he said my driver has been isolating and keeping the car very clean so I’ll take the children up.”She added: “Very, very kind of him, thank you very much Jeremy.”Derek is still in intensive care following his coronavirus battle and remains stable. On Monday’s Good Morning Britain, Kate revealed he had missed their son’s birthday.“I did go and see him yesterday and it was quite a tough visit,” Kate said.“He’s had a tough couple of weeks and you know it’s the first birthday he has missed. It’s Billy’s birthday today so I think I was extra emotional.“And you think of you know, he was there when (Billy) was born and how Derek would like to be present today.”She added that doctors had assured her Derek’s condition had not worsened.“They said sometimes a day when nothing has gone backwards, and nothing has gone wrong is a positive day.“I am desperate for a step forward and I’m sure he is always too. But it’s always lovely to see him and so it’s wonderful to have the chance to do that.”Good Morning Britain airs weekdays at 6am on ITV.READ MORE: Kate Garraway ‘Shaken’ After ‘Utterly Terrifying’ Ordeal That Saw Her Car Tyre Blow Out On Motorway Kate Garraway Shares Hopeful Update On Husband Derek Draper's Recovery From Coronavirus Kate Garraway Returns To Present Good Morning Britain After Three-Month Absence
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We pit Chromebooks versus laptops to see which is the best for students.
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"You've got to sort of work out where that line is for you."
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Apple is the master of product presentation events, and has been for the past decade. In the world of consumer electronics, and consumer products in general, Apple’s had just about as much success as any other company in revealing consumables in a way that makes them exceedingly desirable. A big part of the success Apple’s had in their presentations of … Continue reading
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Epic Games, or at least its outspoken CEO Tim Sweeney, doesn’t like Google that much. To be more specific, he has chided the tech giant’s handling of Android’s Google Play Store, particularly the revenue sharing, though he has recently finally called Apple out as well. For the longest time, one of the company’s biggest titles was absent from Google Play … Continue reading
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It’s well-documented that chemical compounds found in cannabis, especially cannabidiol (CBD), are effective at treating the symptoms of many forms of cancer. But now there’s evidence that it could potentially cure the disease by attacking cancer cells. Cancer researcher Matt Dun, of the University of Newcastle in Australia, recently finished a three-year long study indicating a specific modified strain of cannabis is destructive to certain types of cancer cells while remaining harmless to the human body’s own cells. According to a press release from the University of Newcastle: Laboratory tests conducted at the University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research… This story continues at The Next Web
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President Trump and his son, Donald Trump Jr., recently shared on video clips on Twitter showing a Texas doctor touting hydroxychloroquine as a "cure" for coronavirus and dismissing studies critical of the drug as "fake science." The video, from Breitbart News, has been millions of times across social media. Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter have since took action to remove clips from their platforms. Trump has lashed out in response since the clips were removed, retweeting conspiracy theories about why social platforms removed the video and why they don't want news of hydroxychloroquine to spread. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. President Donald Trump has again accused social media companies of censorship after Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter took down video clips showing a Texas doctor touting hydroxychloroquine as a coronavirus cure. The video in question, posted Tuesday night by Breitbart News, showed a doctor throwing her support behind hydroxychloroquine, a drug the Federal Drug Administration has determined is not an effective treatment for coronavirus. The video quickly gained tens of million views as it spread across social platforms in the hours after it was first shared Tuesday. Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter took down the original Breitbart clips Monday night for violating policies against spreading coronavirus misinformation. However, the video was already spread and shared with millions of people and attracted Twitter posts from the president and his son, Donald Trump Jr.  Trump did not post on Twitter specifically about the video, but he did retweet posts containing the video and accusing tech companies of censorship for removing the video from their platforms. He retweeted a post from right-wing producer Robby Starbuck, who seemed to blame a Facebook spokesperson, who was previously a Democratic communications employee, for deciding to remove the video. "This press conference of doctors had 14 million views on Facebook today," Starbuck wrote in a Twitter thread Monday night. "FB took it down shortly after a NYTimes reporter complained. The FB comms person who replied to the NYTImes reporter confirming it was removed used to work for @SenatorBoxer & @dccc." Starbuck continued: "What business does Facebook have overruling the medical expertise of licensed doctors who've seen hydroxychloroquine work in patients and in studies? ...  Is Facebook unilaterally deciding what science or medicine is accurate?" In the Breitbart video in question, doctors from a group called America's Frontline Doctors insist that hydroxychloroquine is a "cure" for coronavirus, and called studies questioning the effectiveness of the drug "fake science." One of the doctors in the video also insists masks aren't needed to prevent the spread of coronavirus. The claims made in the video capitalize on the conspiracy theory that the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine is an effective coronavirus treatment the medical industry is suppressing in order to profit off the development of a vaccine. However, multiple studies have found hydroxychloroquine is not effective in treating coronavirus, which led the FDA last month to revoke authorization of emergency use of the drug for treating COVID-19 patients. The Daily Beast reports that the doctor in the video, Stella Immanuel, is a religious minister with a history of making claims about the use of alien DNA in medical treatments and blaming certain medical problems on people's dreams about having sex with witches. In addition to removing the video from its platform, Twitter is taking action against high-profile accounts who they say violated its policies on spreading misleading and "potentially harmful" misinformation on the coronavirus. Twitter temporarily limited some features Tuesday for Donald Trump Jr.'s Twitter account, in addition to deleting his tweet containing the Breitbart video. The company took similar actions later Tuesday against Kelli Ward, the chairwoman of the Arizona Republican Party, after she shared a clip on Twitter from the same video.SEE ALSO: Snap is investigating allegations of racism and sexism within the company after some employees complained of a 'whitewashed' culture Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why you don't see brilliantly blue fireworks
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Attackers increasingly try to confuse and bypass machine-learning systems. So the companies that deploy them are getting creative.
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“Boring.” That’s one of the best compliments you can pay an infrastructure technology. No one wants to run their mission-critical applications on “spicy!” But boring? Boring is good.Boring means that a technology has reached a certain level of ubiquity and trust, that it’s well-understood and easily managed. Kubernetes, in production at 78 percent of enterprises, has arguably passed that point, having become widely recognized as standard cloud-enabling plumbing that “just works.”Or, otherwise said, has become “boring.” [ Also on InfoWorld: PaaS, CaaS, or FaaS? How to choose ] Even as the Cloud Native Computing Foundation helps coordinate the development of a range of other projects to fill in any blanks left behind by Kubernetes at the infrastructure layer, the Kubernetes conversation has started to shift to what’s happening higher up the stack. In April, developer advocate superstar Kelsey Hightower observed that Kubernetes only solves half the problem in modernizing applications, if that:To read this article in full, please click here
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The Summer Sale is live, and what a sale it is.
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ProtoVPN IP range fingrered as source of destructive attacks Poorly secured databases are being wiped and vandalized by the thousands in a seemingly automated attack.…
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Struggling with the great DJI Mavic Air 2 vs Mavic 2 Pro conundrum? Our in-depth comparison will help you pick the best drone for you.
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Samsung’s bean-shaped earbuds were hardly a mystery at this point, but we didn’t expect Samsung itself to leak the upcoming Galaxy Buds Live before its big Galaxy Unpacked 2020 event. Sure enough, though, a prematurely updated version of the Samsung Galaxy Buds app has confirmed not only the name of the new earbuds, but most of their features too. Version … Continue reading
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If you’re a Garmin customer, you may have found yourself unable to access the company’s mobile apps, smartwatch syncing features, or even to get ahold of customer support through the company’s call center. This is due to a major ongoing outage, the company has revealed, one that has been taking place for the majority of Thursday. It’s unclear when the … Continue reading
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In a new episode of the I'm So Obsessed podcast, the writer, director and producer implores Hollywood to: "Start hiring us. Start hiring black and brown people to make the decisions for which stories get green-lit."
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But it doesn't necessarily mean the posts contain misinformation.
China
We have already featured some products from the Govee brand, mainly some handy sensors, thermometeres, hygrometers or weather stations. But their scope is much broader ... The post Govee LED strip light with advanced functions on sale appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The battle between Intel and Qualcomm is starting to heat up
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Coronavirus has changed everything. Make sense of it all with the Waugh Zone, our evening politics briefing. Sign up now.Boris Johnson announced on Friday he hoped the UK could largely “return to normality” after the coronavirus pandemic “in time for Christmas”.In a Downing Street press conference, the prime minister set out a new timetable for the lifting of restrictions, provided the virus is under control.Over the course of the next four months, Johnson said the government would look to allow more close contact between friends and family when it can.July 17In England, from Friday, Johnson said he wanted to be “clear” anyone may use public transport.The PM said he still wanted to encourage people to consider alternative means of transport where they are available.July 18Local authorities will have new powers to close specific premises, shut public outdoor spaces, and cancel events. Central government will also soon have the power to close whole sectors or types of premises in a local area.Ministers will be able to introduce local “stay at home” orders, to prevent people entering or leaving defined areas, reduce the maximum size of gatherings beyond national rules, or restrict transport systems serving local areas.The move towards local restrictions is so the government can avoid imposing a second national lockdown.July 25The government previously announced the reopening of indoor gyms, pools and other sports facilities.August 1The government will scrap its blanket advice that people work from home when they can.Instead employers will be given more discretion to make decisions about whether employees should return to offices.Most remaining leisure settings, including bowling, skating rinks and casinos will be allowed to reopen.Close contact services such as beauticians will also be allowed resume.But nightclubs and soft play areas will remain shut.Indoor performances to a live audience, such as theatre, will be reopened.The government will also pilot larger gatherings in venues like sports stadiums, with a view to wider reopening in the autumn.Wedding receptions for up to 30 people will be permitted. SeptemberSchools, nurseries and colleges will be open for all children and young people on a full-time basis, as previously announced.OctoberJohnson said he intended to bring back audiences in stadiums and to allow conferences and other business events to recommence.NovemberThe PM said in November, at the earliest, the government could lift social distancing measures and scrap the one metre rule.Related... Boris Johnson Says Social Distancing Might End In November Boris Johnson Scraps 'Work From Home' Coronavirus Advice From August 1
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A sweeping new antitrust inquiry will affect Google, Apple, Amazon and other smart home developers.
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Failing mega-group discovers again it didn't buy the right biz Arm was pressured by its owner SoftBank to jack up its processor core licensing fees for some of its customers in an effort to squeeze more money out of its $32bn buy of the British chip designer, sources say.…
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(Springer) Living with Computers is the most recent book from the well-known expert in the history of computers James W. Cortada. It is a call to step back and take a look at what computing means, not just to the individual, but to humanity's existence. It is a book about change that addresses essential questions about computing: How did we get here and how do people view computing today?
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A much-loved nameplate may get the new Bronco through the door, but Ford’s new truck is counting on thoughtful details to win over buyers in its competitive segment. Announced this week after years of speculation, the 2021 Bronco promises to combine a tough, no-nonsense platform with sort of attention to detail that gives a modern SUV an edge. Goodbye roof, … Continue reading
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"There aren’t many ways you end up in a bottom of a ditch, face down, with your hands bound."
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Beginning 11 August the company will prohibit ads for products or services marketed for secretly tracking or monitoring someone.
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Ubisoft login failed as gamers tried to to gain their free copy of Watch Dogs 2, but the company promises we'll still get them.
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Albertsons Companies announced that the popular meal-kit subscription service Plated is set to phase out by the end of November, shifting the brand to become one of the grocery retailer's private label products.The end of the subscription service was meant to make way for "a sharper focus on how the brand can help deliver a differentiated in-store experience," Albertsons said in a statement.The past year proved to be difficult for the meal-kit subscription service after Albertsons diminished the availability of meal kits and laid off 10 percent of Plated's corporate staff.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Albertsons Companies announced this week that the popular meal-kit subscription service Plated is set to phase out by the end of November, shifting the brand to become one of the grocery retailer's private label products.The Boise, Idaho-based grocery chain said in a news release that the end of the subscription service was meant to make way for "a sharper focus on how the brand can help deliver a differentiated in-store experience."
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A rise in ransomware attacks and data breaches against hospitals across the US may account for an uptick in heart attack deaths at those hospitals, according to a new study.Ransomware attacks are a rising cybersecurity threat, and their frequency doubled across industries in the past year.The study suggests that as hospitals were forced to adapt to cyber attacks with more robust security and overhauled IT systems, doctors and nurses were slowed down in providing care, losing valuable seconds during emergencies.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.New research reveals a rising threat to cardiac patients that is increasing wait times at hospitals across the country: cyber attacks and data breaches carried out by hackers.A study published by researchers at Vanderbilt and the University of Central Florida earlier this month examined mortality rates for heart attacks at more than 3,000 hospitals nationwide, 311 of which had experienced data breaches.
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