Carlos Edelstein

Carlos Edelstein

Followers 56
Following 38
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Researchers say bigger issues — poverty, corruption, inequality — can undermine rural energy programs if unaddressed.
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Garmin paid a multimillion dollar ransom to recover its data from hackers after they held the files for ransom, Sky News reported Monday. The GPS company was the victim of a major ransomware attack last month that led to a multi-day outage of its services including its smartwatches and aviation products. Garmin paid the money through cybersecurity firm Arete IR after the first firm they sought out turned down the job due to concerns about dealing with sanctioned individuals, according to Sky News. The malware used against Garmin has been attributed to Evil Corp, a Russia-based hacker group that was placed on a US sanctions list last year, according to Bleeping Computer. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. GPS and aviation tech company Garmin paid a multi-million dollar sum to hackers in an effort to recover data that the group had held hostage in a ransomware attack last month, Sky News reported on Monday. On July 23, Garmin's services, which range from smartwatches to aviation products, suffered a major outage. Several days later, the company confirmed that the outage was due to a cyberattack. Several media reports said at the time that the attack involved ransomware, a type of software custom-tailored to encrypt a company's files until a ransom is paid, though Garmin did not publicly name the type of attack. Bleeping Computer reported that Garmin had been targeted by Wastedlocker, a specific ransomware virus that is attributed to a Russia-based hacking group called Evil Corp, and that the group had demanded $10 million for the files. Since the US Treasury Department had sanctioned Evil Corp last year following its cyber heist of more than $100 million from banks around the world, Garmin risked running afoul of the sanctions and incurring fines by paying the ransom. The first cybersecurity company Garmin asked to help it pay the ransom turned down the job, citing the sanctions as its reason for refusing to provide its services in cases involving Wastedlocker, Sky News reported. Garmin then turned to another firm, Arete IR, which doesn't believe Evil Corp is necessarily behind Wastedlocker and ultimately worked with the company to help it pay the ransom, according to Sky News. As media reports circulated last month naming Wastedlocker as the ransomware used against Garmin, Arete tweeted a link to a report it had published that claimed security research linking the ransomware to Evil Corp was "not conclusive." WastedLocker is a new variant of #ransomware that was initially reported in May and is rumored to have come from the "Evil Corp" group. In this insight, we discuss the four main reasons why Arete experts determined this theory to be inconclusive. (https://t.co/fZUmHCXMMn) pic.twitter.com/hvdMNEEVpe — Arete Incident Response (@Arete_Advisors) July 24, 2020 Garmin and Arete IR did not immediately respond to requests for comment.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
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Huawei officially announced that the 2020 Huawei Developer Conference ‘HDC Together’ will be held in Songshan Lake, Dongguan from September 10 to September 12. The ... The post Harmony OS 2.0 Will Officially Come At HDC Together Conference (Sep. 10 – 12) appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The free download was Sony's idea according to game designer
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The earliest possible date for the return to offices is January 19
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Starting a new job remotely could become the new norm, with some surveys suggesting that two-thirds of companies expect employees to work from home long term.  Celonis' new COO Arsenio Otero joined the tech unicorn from cloud computing giant Salesforce in the middle of the pandemic.  Otero shared his five tips on starting a new job remotely. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Starting a new job can be stressful even in normal times. Joining a company without meeting your new colleagues in person or visiting the office makes the prospect even more daunting.  But, with two-thirds of companies set to be working for home for the foreseeable future, many of us will have to start new jobs remotely. One person who knows what this is like is Aresnio Otero, the new COO of enterprise software firm Celonis. He joined the $2.5 billion startup in the midst of the pandemic in May, to help grow it into the "next big IT company."  Otero has plenty of experience in the computing space, having previously served as COO of Salesforce's international business. Over the last 9 years he has helped Salesforce become a cloud computing giant with a market cap of $179 billion, growing revenue from the low hundred million dollars to multi-billion dollars. Here he shares five tips for anyone else starting a new job remotely: 1. Use virtual interviews to your advantage "The interview when you are virtual gives you some advantages. I think that it gives you the opportunity to really show things in reality, more than talk about things," says Otero. He advises using it as an opportunity to show physical evidence of your previous work, leveraging the digital interview setting by sharing examples on your screen or sending links to your interviewers.  To mitigate against the difficulties of interviewing online, Otero suggests paying more attention to your body language and eye contact, and to spend time building a connection at the start of the interview. "I like always to start the interviews ... just getting to know each other with an intro, talking about different topics, and then we jump into talking about the role," he says.  2. Start the onboarding process before your first day "For me, the onboarding process does not start on your first day, it starts even before," says Otero. "Onboarding is the time for learning it's the time to meet the people, to learn about the company, and to embrace the culture. While online learning can easily substitute for some of the onboarding process, it is harder to build connections and absorb company culture from afar, says Otero. Otero advises spending time before you start reaching out to members of your team and learning about the company's culture from their website and social media. He says: "The good news [for me] was that Celonis made, at the same time as I was onboarding, a very good campaign about our culture and our values."  3. Get to know your colleagues personally as well as professionally Workplace messaging platforms make it relatively easy to get work done from home, but they are also a great way to connect with new colleagues on a personal level, says Otero. "I made a step forward and shared with all of them about my hobbies what I was doing, my family," says Otero. "Start sharing in all the channels and start receiving from them." He adds: "In the same way that you are commenting and giving feedback on a presentation, if someone is talking about their [personal] plans or something and you like it, or you have advice, give it to them." 3. Seek advice from your coworkers Approach your coworkers in listening mode to find out what you can learn from them, says Otero. "They are the experts, they are the ones that have been here, they are the ones that have built this great company," he says.  For Otero as a senior hire, this means making sure he focuses on his team's needs by being open about his approach and welcoming suggestions from them. Working together on problems will help you to earn their respect, he says: "It's time to have those coaching opportunities, but it's one of the most difficult areas building that with your team, and you need to invest time." 5. Take time to unwind Working remotely can be draining, with many of us suffering from 'Zoom burnout'. When you join a new company you want to make a good impression, but its still important to take time away from your screen to unwind, says Otero. "Adjust your agenda to the virtual world," says Otero. "Disconnect mentally from one call after another after another." He advises introducing a 15-20 minute buffer between calls to give you a chance to to take a breather. You can build this into the schedule by cutting down the length of calls. At Celonis, Otero says, they have found that in-person meetings that used to last 90 minutes can now be done online in half the time.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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Realme is pretty mich making its name in the market as not only a smartphone maker but a company that produces several products with a ... The post Realme Buds 3 launching in India next month, there will be a Realme Buds with ANC appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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The suit concerns what some people call Apple’s “App Store Tax”.
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(University of the Witwatersrand) Researchers at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, have demonstrated a record setting quantum protocol for sharing a secret amongst many parties.
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It follows a young boy on a summer adventure and comes out next June.
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Wednesday's tech antitrust hearing was a grueling six-hour event in which House committee members grilled Jeff Bezos, Tim Cook, Mark Zuckerberg, and Sundar Pichai about their companies' market power.  Cook, Apple's CEO, received what seemed like the fewest questions, but he was asked about the App Store and how Apple treats app developers.  Zuckerberg was probed on Facebook's acquisition strategy and whether it bought companies like Instagram to "neutralize" a competitor.  Pichai, who is CEO of Google-parent Alphabet, received what seemed like the most questions from the committee on matters ranging from perceived conservative censorship to Google's search dominance.  Bezos had perhaps the most surprising admission of the day when he admitted Amazon may have violated its own policies when it comes to third-party seller data and its private-label business.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Four of tech's most high-profile leaders spend nearly six hours on Wednesday being grilled before the House Judiciary Committee's antitrust subcommittee.  The hearing allowed subcommittee chair Rep. David Cicilline to compel Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Apple CEO Tim Cook, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet, to answer questions on their companies' acquisition strategies, data collection tactics, advertising methods, and behavior toward consumers and third-party vendors that use their platforms. The hearing also opened up the floor to questions unrelated to antitrust. Several members of the committee grilled executives like Zuckerberg and Pichai over what they see as conservative censorship on their platforms, and Cook and Bezos were questioned on topics like cancel culture and charitable donations through their platforms.  Wednesday's hearing was the first time Bezos testified before Congress and the first time all four major tech CEOs testified alongside each other. The subcommittee said it would use the testimonies it gathered Wednesday to complete its year-long investigation into whether Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google engaged in anticompetitive practices. But if you didn't sit through all six hours of testimony, here's what you need to know about how each CEO was questioned Wednesday's hearing. Tim Cook was scrutinized over Apple's treatment of app developers Cook was largely left alone for a significant portion of the hearing. When he was questioned, Cook was mostly asked about the App Store, and whether Apple applies rules differently to different developers. Rep. Hank Johnson, a Democrat from Georgia, told Cook the committee's investigation had found that "the rules are made up as you go, they are arbitrarily interpreted and enforced, and are subject to change whenever Apple sees fit to change." Cook denied that's the case, saying the company treats every developer the same.  "We have open and transparent rules, it's a rigorous process," Cook said. "Because we care so deeply about privacy and security and quality we do look at every app before it goes on. But those rules apply evenly to everyone." When Johnson asked whether Apple would ever raise App Store commission fees, Cook replied that doing so would push developers to other app stores. "It's so competitive I would describe it as a street fight for market share," Cook said. Cook also denied assertions that the company would retaliate against developers who complained about Apple's policies, saying that "it's strongly against our company culture" to bully or retaliate against people.  Mark Zuckerberg was pushed on Facebook's acquisition tactics and its treatment of rivals Zuckerberg, along with Pichai, seemed to face the brunt of the committee's questioning. Lawmakers devoted a significant amount of time to how Facebook treats rivals in the social media space. Rep. Pramila Jayapal questioned Zuckerberg on whether the company's competitive strategy includes outright copying features from rivals, and Zuckerberg admitted that Facebook has "certainly adapted features" from other companies. Lawmakers also grilled Zuckerberg on whether Facebook had ever threatened to clone a rival's product in an attempt to acquire it, like in the case of Snapchat and Instagram, and whether he saw the acquisition as a means to "neutralize" a competitor, which Zuckerberg denied. "It was clear that this was a space that we were going to compete in one way or another," Zuckerberg said about Instagram. "I don't view those conversations as a threat in any way." Elsewhere in the hearing, Zuckerberg addressed what some lawmakers viewed as conservative censorship on the platform. Zuckerberg defended Facebook's content moderation policies and said he would investigate complaints of bias among moderators.  "We want to make sure that anything we do reflects the values of the company that we'll give everyone a voice," Zuckerberg said.  Sundar Pichai faced accusations that Google abuses its search prowess to identify competition and crush it Like Facebook, Pichai had to defend Google over assertions from GOP lawmakers that its platform is inherently biased against conservatives, that it actively attempted to help Hillary Clinton get elected in 2016, and that it's censoring information about an unproven treatment for the coronavirus a malaria drug called hydroxychloroquine. Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon, Democrat of Pennsylvania, described several of these notions as "fringe conspiracy theories."  But Pichai faced a tougher line of questioning when it came to Google's power over its competitors — Cicilline pointed to Yelp, specifically, as a competitor that Google has wielded unfair power over by threatening to delist Yelp in search results. Cicilline questioned Pichai over what the committee sees as a conflict of interest: that Google search results will frequently point users to other Google products, like YouTube, over competitors. Pichai denied that search results favor Google products. "We have always focused on providing users with the most relevant information," Pichai said. Pichai was also questioned over Google's relationship with China — he initially told the committee he didn't have "first-hand knowledge" of China stealing information from Google, though it was one of the main reasons Google pulled out of China. (Pichai later corrected this statement.) Jeff Bezos was grilled on Amazon's relationship with third-party sellers Bezos wasn't questioned for a significant portion of the hearing after what was likely a technical issue. But lawmakers quickly piled on the questions for Bezos on multiple aspects of the company's business, particularly its relationship with third-party sellers. In perhaps the most revelatory moment of the hearing, Bezos told the committee that he couldn't guarantee Amazon had never violated its own policies when it comes using trend data about third-party sellers to dictate Amazon's private-label products.  Amazon was accused of using its size to bully and harass third-party vendors, and that sellers have no other choice but to work with Amazon because "it's the only game in town," according to Cicilline.  Bezos didn't deny that that type of behavior had taken place, but stopped short of admitting any wrongdoing on Amazon's part.  "It does not seem like the correct way to treat her," Bezos said about comments from a third-party seller who said she'd been crushed by Amazon. "I don't understand what's going on in that anecdote. I do not think that's systematically what's going on."Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Leslie Odom, Jr.'s $500,000 gamble that led to a starring role in 'Hamilton'
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Photo by Chris Welch / The Verge Amazon has long been accused of undercutting its rivals with its Echo smart speakers, allegedly keeping competitors like Sonos from getting a foothold in the market — but Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos says that at their full retail price, the company isn’t taking a loss on these products. During the big antitrust hearing today where Apple CEO Tim Cook, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are also facing down lawmaker questions, Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) asked a pointed question about whether Amazon was pricing its Echo devices below cost. This is possibly referring to the theory of predatory pricing where a company tries to drive its rivals out of business by selling products at a loss, something Amazon specifically has... Continue reading…
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TLDR: A one-year subscription to QuickBooks Essentials gives you online access to all of your company’s financial information and payment operations anywhere. Remember when companies used to have on-staff accountants? You know, the bean counters who used to crunch all the numbers, chase all the outstanding accounts, and make sure there was still enough cash at the end of the week to get everyone paid? Wasn’t that a great time? Today, there aren’t a lot of companies that can afford the luxury of a full-time accountant anymore. And it shows. Especially when more than eight out of every 10 businesses… This story continues at The Next Web
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Rebecca Jones, of London, recently pulled up Amazon.co.uk to search for a phone adapter. She was reading through the reviews for one she was considering buying, when suddenly she started noticing mentions of what a great taco holder the product was. “The taco holder got great reviews, but there wasn’t much for my phone adapter,” said Jones by email. “You do sometimes see reviews for slightly different items appear on a listing, but this was definitely a new one for me.” Jones had likely stumbled across something called “review hijacking”—a way that sellers can effectively steal reviews from older products… This story continues at The Next Web
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Coronavirus has changed everything. Make sense of it all with the Waugh Zone, our evening politics briefing. Sign up now.Boris Johnson has warned lockdown-sceptic Tory MPs the UK could see a second coronavirus spike unless it “throttles the life” out of the disease, HuffPost UK has learned.The prime minister rebuffed calls to further ease restrictions, telling MPs at the Tory backbench 1922 committee “don’t think it couldn’t happen here” in an apparent reference to countries like the US which have suffered second peaks.One MP asked whether Johnson could make it the default position that businesses, entertainment and other premises are open unless told to close.But the PM stressed “we can’t be complacent” and insisted: “We are doing our best to throttle the life out of the virus”.Meanwhile, Johnson told backbench Tories, many of whom are calling for a tougher approach to China, that the government was not going to be “mindlessly adversarial” towards Beijing.It came after US secretary of state Mike Pompeo told China-sceptic Tories he would like to see the UK adopt a harder “grand strategy” towards China, and reportedly accused Beijing of “buying” the head of the World Health Organisation.Johnson told MPs he would continue to take action where appropriate on issues like the Hong Kong security law and the persecution of Uyghurs in Xinjiang.“I’m an admirer of Chinese culture and civilisation but that doesn’t mean at the same time we can’t call China out where they are going wrong,” the PM said.He said the UK would “continue to engage” but conceded “we’ve got to be tough”.“We have to be strong and stick to our principles,” the PM.One MP said Johnson’s message at the end of the parliamentary term ahead of summer recess was that the last few months had been “tough” but that he was now “extremely forward looking and positive”, if “cautious and wary” about coronavirus.Another said the PM “did very well” in an “end of term style speech” to a well-attended meeting of highly supportive MPs, who left “in good spirits”.Related... Some Care Home Residents In England To Be Allowed Visitors Again Contractor Gets £45m To Run Test And Trace – Then Outsources It To 29 Other Companies Minister Tries To Quell Fears Cummings Could Interfere With Intel Committee
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Apple's 2022 iPhone could come with a different type of camera lens that's generally better-equipped for taking zoomed photos, according to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. This periscope-style lens is already available on smartphones from Samsung and Huawei. Cameras have become one of the biggest ways in which smartphone makers differentiate their products from those of competitors. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Apple hasn't even launched its much-rumored iPhone 12 yet, but reports are already starting to paint a picture of what to expect two years ahead in 2022. One well-known Apple analyst suggests the company's 2022 iPhone may have a different type of camera lens that would make it much better at taking zoomed photos. Ming-Chi Kuo, an analyst with TF International Securities known for his predictions about unreleased Apple products, said in a new report that the 2022 iPhone will likely have a periscope lens. Kuo's research was reported by 9to5Mac, Apple Insider, and MacRumors.  It's not the first time Kuo has mentioned that Apple may be planning to outfit its future iPhone with a periscope lens; the analyst issued a similar report back in March. Apple did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.  A periscope lens uses a mirror to help it achieve a closer optical zoom, which would ultimately result it crisper zoomed images compared to digital zoom. Phones like Samsung's Galaxy S20 Ultra and the Huawei P30 Pro already use periscope lenses for zooming. Samsung's phone, for example, provides a 10x optical zoom, while Huawei's offers a 5X optical zoom. The iPhone 11 Pro, by comparison, only supports a 2x optical zoom. It could be a critical addition for Apple as cameras have become one of the biggest ways in which companies differentiate their devices from competitors. And data shows that camera quality plays a role in the buying decision when purchasing a new smartphone. Data from Global Web Index published in 2019 listed "more camera and video capabilities" among the top five most desired smartphone features based on its survey of internet users between the ages of 16 and 64 in the United States and United Kingdom.  Both Samsung and Apple flaunted their respective phones' cameras as major selling points when announcing the Galaxy S20 Ultra and iPhone 11 Pro. The S20 Ultra can zoom in at up to 100x digitally (although doing so may result in blurry photos), while the iPhone 11 Pro is Apple's first smartphone to come with a triple lens camera. As for this year's iPhone, Apple is expected to add a depth sensor to the iPhone 12's camera system much like the one found on the company's latest iPad Pro. Kuo's note also mentioned that the iPhone 12 may have better autofocus capabilities.SEE ALSO: In a rare move from Apple, the new iPhone 12 could be cheaper than most other 5G phones Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
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Two ships caught both sections of the Falcon 9 rocket’s nose cone
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We are now in an era where the battery and fast charging capacity is getting much attention. In recent times, we have heard of a ... The post Lenovo Legion Pro 90W fast charging fill its 5000 mAh battery in 30 minutes appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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iTunes, once described as “the best Windows app ever written” by the ever-modest Steve Jobs, has already been transformed into multiple apps for Apple devices. But when will the company’s focus on media and services drive it to introduce better Windows apps?Coming soon, hopefully Apple’s media services focus seems to put the spoken word at the center of the strategy: TV+ delivers video and speaking content. Books also offers audiobooks. Apple Music offers the Beats radio channel. News/News+ now provides spoken daily word news briefings and reports. And the company is thought to be investing in podcasts. Ever since the iPod, Apple’s services vision has embraced other platforms. Just as iTunes was on Windows, TV is on televisions and streaming sticks and Apple Music is available to Windows and Android users.To read this article in full, please click here
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At the end of this year, Sony and Microsoft will launch new consoles, and at this point, it seems very likely that we’ll still be grappling with the coronavirus pandemic when that happens. While you might think that a pandemic would decrease demand for new (and probably expensive) consoles, Sony is reportedly boosting its PlayStation 5 production, anticipating increased demand … Continue reading
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As the pandemic stretches on, they are turning out to be more than a fad
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Millions of Americans are collecting unemployment insurance, but will you be taxed on it?
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Microsoft is reportedly making more cuts to its MSN editorial team, according to GeekWire. The company previously laid off dozens of contractors working on MSN, people close to the situation told Business Insider in June. Microsoft has yet to confirm the MSN layoffs. GeekWire said Microsoft "isn't commenting publicly," and Microsoft has yet to respond to an earlier request from Business Insider. Staffing changes are relatively common within Microsoft around the time its new fiscal year rolls around on July 1. Are you a Microsoft employee? Contact this reporter via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-425-344-8242) or email ([email protected]). Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Microsoft is making more cuts to the MSN editorial team, GeekWire reported Monday, citing unnamed sources familiar with the situation. The company in June cut dozens of editorial contractors in favor of an artificial intelligence-driven system of picking news for MSN.com, one of the world's most popular news destinations. People close to the situation told Business Insider in June that the layoffs impacted all of its around 50 contractors in the US. Now, GeekWire reports, the company is laying off an unspecified number of full-time employees in the same MSN unit, including some senior leaders. Microsoft has yet to confirm the MSN layoffs. GeekWire said Microsoft "isn't commenting publicly," and Microsoft has yet to respond to an earlier request from Business Insider. Microsoft typically makes changes to its headcount around the time it begins a new fiscal year on July 1. Perhaps the most significant of these changes came in 2017 when the company reorganized its entire sales organization to focus on cloud computing, and laid off thousands of employees. This year, prior to the end of Microsoft's fiscal year on June 30, Microsoft announced plans to close all of its physical retail locations and shut down its video game streaming service Mixer.  Got a tip? Contact Ashley Stewart via email at [email protected], message her on Twitter @ashannstew, or send her a secure message through Signal at 425-344-8242Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: A cleaning expert reveals her 3-step method for cleaning your entire home quickly
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The possible second-gen Google Nest Home is bigger and may offer some new features that older models lack.
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This article was originally published by Built In. I was called gay for the first time when I was 11, before I even knew what the word meant. It was then that my journey to find belonging began. When I finally found refuge in New York City after college, I naively thought everything would change for me overnight. By the end of my first week, I had already encountered homophobic slurs on the street. I still felt bothered everywhere I went, and, as I began my job search, I desperately looked for a place where I would fit in. I landed my… This story continues at The Next Web
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Hackers hit honeypots hours after CISO downplays risk, proof-of-concept exploit code emerges VIdeo  This week Citrix tried to reassure everyone the 11 security flaws it just patched in its network perimeter products weren't all that bad. Well, we hope they're right because someone's scanning the internet looking for vulnerable installations.…
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Aussie airline Qantas is running a direct flight from Heathrow to Sydney tomorrow, carrying an invited passenger list of just 50 people on the 18.5-hour direct flight around the world.It's being described as a "research flight" to see how passengers and crew take to the idea of being in the air for such a long time.This is the second flight Qantas is running as part of its Project Sunrise scheme, to test appetite for and organise the onboard staff scheduling of non-stop flights of such extreme duration.The first Sunrise test flew from New York to Sydney earlier this year, and tomorrow's UK-Australia ultra-haul is carrying out another piece of key airline business on the side too – it's the delivery flight of a brand new 787 Dreamliner, which would've crossed the world empty otherwise.Qantas says the last time a commercial flight did UK-Sydney direct was in 1989, such a long time ago that everyone's forgotten how tortuous it was and is ready to try again.
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Sainsbury’s opened its doors on London’s Drury Lane in 1869, marking a humble beginning for what has grown into Britain’s second-largest grocery chain.To play off that history as the brand turns 150—plus a healthy dose of magical realism—Sainsbury’s 2019 Christmas ad from Wieden + Kennedy London tells a Dickensian story based around its first location.In the spot, the dreary life of a soot-caked young boy called Nicholas the Sweep takes a turn for the disastrous when he’s falsely accused of stealing produce.From there, the rather boilerplate setup goes in some unexpected directions, with a bit of help from the store’s co-founder, Mary Ann Sainsbury.While it starts as a relatively straightforward tale of a young street urchin saved from a life of misery by a kindly benefactor, the ad takes a rather unexpected twist when we learn that Nicholas’ journey actually leads to him becoming… Saint Nicholas.It’s an odd bit of revisionist history that sidelines good old Saint Nicholas of Myra, but it’s doubtful too many viewers will think the brand is literally trying to rewrite one of Christmas’ most central characters.
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