Christopher Hardy

Christopher Hardy

Followers 47
Following 50
UK
iRobot’s smart robot vacuums are getting a cheaper baby brother, with the Roomba i3+ promising intelligent navigation and the ability to empty its own bin. Joining the existing Roomba i7+ and s9+ models, the i3+ uses the company’s Genius Home Intelligence platform for easier feature updates down the line. It looks much like a regular Roomba, though the i3+ does … Continue reading
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The best loungewear sets have the comfort of pajamas and the style of casual clothing. We've rounded up some loungewear sets for women that we love.
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(DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)) Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, show that it is possible to distinguish between left-handed and right-handed people by noninvasively monitoring just their brain activity during passive tactile stimulation. These results are key in haptic research (the study of sensory systems) and have various important implications for brain-computer interfaces, augmented reality, and even artificial intelligence.
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Full fibre is now available to 14 per cent of the UK, while more than half can now get 300Mbps.
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Counting by multiple groups — sometimes called crosstab reports — can be a useful way to look at data ranging from public opinion surveys to medical tests. For example, how did people vote by gender and age group? How many software developers who use both R and Python are men vs. women?There are a lot of ways to do this kind of counting by categories in R. Here, I’d like to share some of my favorites. For the demos in this article, I’ll use a subset of the Stack Overflow Developers survey, which surveys developers on dozens of topics ranging from salaries to technologies used. I’ll whittle it down with columns for languages used, gender, and if they code as a hobby. I also added my own LanguageGroup column for whether a developer reported using R, Python, both, or neither.To read this article in full, please click here
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He also defended the use of the same sensor in Google Pixel phones over the years.
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It's free, and it's the only event where you'll find Brie Larson, Nia DaCosta, Anthony Fauci, Ghetto Gastro, Sarah Friar, and more all on one lineup.
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"Too many businesses are ending up with security in one silo, NetOps in another silo: it becomes really hard for organisations of any size to monitor the network as a result: how much of your network do you see? What projects are going on around cloud?" The post How to Tackle Network Performance, Security and Multi-cloud Challenges with Gigamon­­ appeared first on Computer Business Review.
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Taboola and Outbrain, best known as the rival chumbox providers who fill space on your favorite websites with garbage like “You Won’t Believe What [NAME] Looks Like Today!” and the ever-popular “1 Weird Trick,” will apparently not be merging into the ultimate source of low-quality web filler we’d feared ever since the Department of Justice saw fit to put its stamp of approval on the deal. CNBC, The Wall Street Journal and TechCrunch are all reporting that the merger, first announced in October 2019, is being called off, after an attempt to renegotiate changing conditions due to the COVID-19 pandemic didn’t result in a new agreement. What a shame! If you’re curious what a chumbox looks like, you won’t have to look far. (Vox Media is not... Continue reading…
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Photo by Kimberly White/Getty Images for TurboTax The Federal Trade Commission is actively investigating Intuit, maker of the popular TurboTax tax preparation software, according to a new report by ProPublica. The case was revealed in a public court filing, in which Intuit sought to limit the scope of the investigation. The investigation centers on TurboTax’s “Free File” product, offered free of charge to most Americans in exchange for the assurance that the IRS would not develop a competing product. But a string of ProPublica investigations found that Intuit had made Free File difficult to find, in one case adding code to prevent it from being indexed by search engines. As a result, many users who were eligible for the free TurboTax filing may have been diverted to paid products. Now,... Continue reading…
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Trump had extra time to spend in the ambassador's home after canceling his cemetery visit, and found some art he liked, Bloomberg reported.
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The yacht's owners dropped anchor improperly, damaging hundreds of coral colonies. Much of the damage came from its chain "swinging through the bed."
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Fury for business: HP ZBook Fury features 8-core CPU, Quadro RTX graphics, Pantone Validated LCD.
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A new Xiaomi smartphone with a model number M2007J22C has obtained network access permission. Information on the relevant page shows that the phone supports 5G. ... The post Alleged Redmi Note 10 Obtained Network Access Permission appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Pilot fish is assigned to write a program to handle call center requests — everything from service scheduling and machine tracking to engineering change requests and design issues.“Doing my best due diligence, I went from one department head to the next, pen and paper in hand, and asked each one for specific ideas of what they wanted,” says fish. “Each of them responded the same: ‘I don’t know. Put something together and then we’ll tweak it.’”Undaunted, fish goes to potential users in each department, asking for input. But it’s the same story: “Put something together and we’ll figure it out from there.”Fish thinks long and hard — how can he write this with no input? But he gets a devilish idea and soon tells all the department heads and the company president to assemble for a demonstration in a meeting room. He has second thoughts when the president actually shows up, but it’s too late to change course.To read this article in full, please click here
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Not as much as the Chromecast Ultra, from the looks of things.
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No one's talking about the American EF Pro Cycling team winning the three-week Tour. They prefer it that way.
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A new member of the popular affordable UMIDIGI A7 series, the UMIDIGI A7S is apparently coming soon. UMIDIGI’s Twitter posted some render images and a ... The post UMIDIGI A7S coming soon with IR thermometer function appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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It might sound uncomfortable, but it's for your own good
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The best smart scales can tell you about much more than just your weight.
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Visa is investing in MagicCube, a payments-security fintech focused on enabling devices like smartphones to accept payments. In lieu of buying checkout hardware, merchants could use devices like smartphones to accept payments in the future. MagicCube built the card industry-backed security needed for widespread adoption. Earlier this year, Apple acquired Mobeewave, another fintech that turns smartphones into payment terminals. MagicCube has raised over $12 million to date from investors including Bold Capital, Epic Ventures, and the Sony Innovation Fund. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The race toward hardware-less payments is on, and Visa is investing in MagicCube, a startup that helps turn devices like smartphones and cars into a way to handle transactions. Inside any point-of-sale device — be it a sleek Square terminal, traditional Verifone keypad, and even a kiosk at a movie theater — there are expensive and bulky security measures built into the hardware. From various security chips and even a gold-mesh layer under the keypad to prevent tampering, there are limitations to the actual hardware required to process payments.  "The device that you dip or swipe your card in the supermarket, like an Ingenico or a Verifone device, is a complex, 'Mission Impossible' device," Sam Shawki, co-founder and CEO of MagicCube told Business Insider.  Read more: Retail will need to be reinvented after the pandemic. PayPal cofounder Max Levchin lays out the future of brick-and-mortar, and the 'software fight' that will go on behind the scenes MagicCube's security tech aims to eliminate the need for such hardware, instead providing the same level of authentication and protection through software. On Monday, Visa announced it was investing an undisclosed amount in the fintech. Thus far, the startup has raised over $12 million to date from investors including Bold Capital, Epic Ventures, and the Sony Innovation Fund. Shawki, who was previously head of remote payments at Visa, left the card giant in 2014 to build MagicCube. His co-founder and wife, Nancy Zayed, is the fintech's CTO and was formerly an engineer at Apple. MagicCube's software secures transactions with new forms of payments, like Visa's Tap to Phone technology, which enables merchants to accept payments on their own smartphone devices. "[MagicCube] will help transform the small businesses that might not be able to afford fancy purpose-built, static, hardware-based point of sale technology," Mary Kay Bowman, global head of seller solutions at Visa, told Business Insider.  Flexibility in where and how a business accepts payments has become more important, especially as points-of-sale shift to curbsides and other touch-free options due to the coronavirus. "We basically built something that can replace a SIM card or a chip or a payment device. These are all physical containers, like a physical safe you have at home," Shawki said. "The patents that we have are related to the fact that our virtualization, unlike VMware, is for security, not efficiency," Shawki said. "We've created a virtual safe. That's really the core tech." MagicCube has spent years building trust in its security MagicCube spent the last five years building and proving out its security tech — crucial groundwork when it comes to processing sensitive information like payments.  "The hurdle of moving from hardware to software is multi-fold," Shawki said. "First off, it's security. Second is the ability to prove that security." To that end, Shawki worked with EMVCo, an industry consortium that counts all the major card networks as members, to have MagicCube's security tech recognized as a "trusted execution environment." And while MagicCube's security tech can apply to many Internet of Things (IoT) devices like connected cars, Shawki found that working with banks would be the path of least resistance to adoption. "When we started to pitch this as pure security for cars, we had a few projects with the likes of Honda and others, but none of them were ready and eager to use us commercially like Visa and Mastercard were," Shawki said. "So we decided to go full throttle with a Tap to Phone and pin as leading products," Shawki said. MagicCube isn't the only one eyeing software-based payments Earlier this year, Apple acquired a payments software company called Mobeewave, which enables iPhones to become payment-accepting devices. And while it may seem that Apple is looking to directly compete with the likes of Square, Shawki says that's not the case. Selling payments hardware itself is a small part of Square's revenue. In the second quarter this year, hardware generated $19 million in revenue, about 2% of Square's seller revenue, which totaled $732 million. For players like Square, the bulk of revenue comes from processing payments, and that revenue doesn't go away with software-based points of sale. "I think Apple and Square will work together. I think we will work with Apple. This is about getting rid of Ingenico and Verifone, not to choose names, but those entities" Shawki said. Read more: A Mastercard exec lays out how a surge in contactless payments is giving the company an unexpected boost as people rethink touching cash But in the meantime, as Apple builds out its software-based payments in the iPhone, MagicCube is now eyeing the massive Samsung and Android market. And earlier this year, Visa announced that Samsung was one of its pilot partners in the Tap to Phone technology. "We're being pushed harder after the Mobeewave acquisition," Shawki said. "It's going to take Apple time to produce, and it's also leaving the Samsung and Android market open. So I think we are now one of the big bets on the Android side." Hardware-less payments requires a move toward contactless tap-to-pay tech  To be sure, a key part of MagicCube's adoption hinges on consumers adopting contactless tech. If a merchant eliminates card-reading hardware and opts to accept payments on a smartphone, customers will need to have contactless-enabled cards or digital wallets to pay. "When we say hardware free, you still have to read the card," Shawki said. "The only way to read the card is if it is a contactless card. That's why most of my sales currently are in Latin America, Europe, and the Middle East." The US has traditionally lagged other markets like Europe and Australia in the adoption of contactless payments. But the coronavirus pandemic has accelerated the pre-existing trend toward more tap-to-pay technology, with merchants and consumers alike looking for safer, touch-free ways to pay. Networks like Amex, Mastercard, and Visa are all pushing for contactless adoption, both through digital wallets and reissuing updated cards to their customers. "Visa is telling us that next year is our year," Shawki said.  Tap-to-pay tech has taken off in markets like China, which are more mobile-first than the US when it comes to commerce. Visa's Tap to Phone tech is currently active in 16 countries, and now, with digital payments taking off amid the coronavirus pandemic, Visa is looking to the US. "Some of the challenges that we're seeing in the US now for small businesses always existed in those other countries where the traditional commerce infrastructure that we've had in North America just hasn't been there," Visa's Bowman said. "When we think about it in the US, I do think that this move to somewhat mobile commerce and using devices like Tap to Phone is the first place that we're really looking, because there is a demand and a need that is currently unmet from small businesses." Read more The CFO of Visa maps out 2 areas it's investing in beyond cards to keep up with fintechs that are transforming the payments game Contactless cards have arrived in the US, and networks are betting on transit to drive adoption. We asked execs at Mastercard, Amex, and Visa why it took so long. PayPal's CFO explains why the payment giant is going against the grain and betting big on QR codes as the new way to pay in-storeSEE ALSO: A Mastercard exec lays out how a surge in contactless payments is giving the company an unexpected boost as people rethink touching cash SEE ALSO: Retail will need to be reinvented after the pandemic. PayPal cofounder Max Levchin lays out the future of brick-and-mortar, and the 'software fight' that will go on behind the scenes Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
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Amazon made a metric called "return on ad spend," or ROAS, available on its ad service for sponsored ads this month. Until now, advertisers had to use a different metric called "advertising cost of sales," or ACOS, to track their ad effectiveness on Amazon. Ad agencies say the update makes it easier to compare ad efficiencies against other ad platforms, like Google and Facebook, and is part of Amazon's effort to attract bigger ad buyers. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Amazon has made a more conventional metric available to advertisers on its site this month, a move experts say could help make its ad service more appealing to big brands. The metric, called "return on ad spend," or ROAS, is commonly used among advertisers to measure their ad efficiency. The number is derived by dividing the total sales generated by the advertising spend. For example, if you spend $10 on an ad campaign that generates $200 in revenue, the ROAS is 20. Before the ROAS availability, Amazon advertisers were using a metric called "advertising cost of sales," or ACOS, instead, to measure the effectiveness of their ads. ACOS is calculated by dividing the advertising spend by total sales generated — or by simply flipping ROAS. For example, if you spend $10 on an ad campaign that generates $200 in revenue, the ACOS is 5%. On the surface, the move to ROAS may not be a significant development, as it's a direct inverse of the ratio that advertisers were already using. But Amazon advertisers have been calling for this change for a long time, especially the large brands, as ROAS is more commonly used on other ad services, like Facebook and Google, according to ad agencies.  "By including the ROAS metrics for everyone, Amazon makes it easier for advertisers to compare like-for-like with other channels," said Andrew Waber, director of insights at Teikametrics, a company that helps merchants sell on Amazon. Amazon's spokesperson confirmed the change in an email to Business Insider, saying the update was recently made across its sponsored ads service, or the ads that show up next to search results on Amazon. "We're always evolving our tools and products to better serve our advertisers, and look to serve them in a variety of ways based on their needs and goals," Amazon's spokesperson said in a statement. 'Heavily requested' Franz Jordan, CEO of Sellics, an agency that helps sellers on Amazon, said ROAS has been "heavily requested" by larger advertisers because it's the "standard advertising metric" used on other ad platforms. While ACOS is popular among the smaller sellers on Amazon, it's still an "outlier" in the mainstream advertising space, he said.  The move is all part of Amazon's broader effort to cater to larger advertisers, Jordan said. Amazon has made a series of moves in recent years to become more attractive to larger brands. For example, it's invested heavily in newer ad features, like video and content, and has been growing its platform that sells ads showing up on non-Amazon sites, by using Amazon's own data for targeting purposes. Amazon is also holding a big advertising conference, called AdCon, for the second straight year, showing its commitment to promoting its fast-growing ad service. "It's no secret that Amazon advertising also wants to appeal to larger brands," Jordan said. Amazon's ad business, which largely makes money by charging sellers and brands to promote their products on its site, recorded $4.2 billion in sales in its most recent quarter, up 41% from the year-ago period. According to eMarketer, Amazon is expected to own 9.5% of the US digital market this year, behind only Google and Facebook, which control a combined 53% of the market. There's another benefit to showcasing ROAS over ACOS: it sounds more positive. Ad agencies say while the two metrics are effectively measuring the same thing, ROAS has a more positive air to it because it tells you how much return you have generated as opposed to ACOS, which shows how much margin you are paying to Amazon. "This is largely a step towards maturing and simplifying the lives of the advertisers measuring ads on Amazon," said Sreenath Reddy, founder of Intentwise, an ad agency for Amazon sellers.SEE ALSO: Amazon quietly launched a new website for its big ad conference, which returns for its second straight year amid the company's surging digital ad sales Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
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While users were struggling to use Gmail‘s services yesterday for a long time, Google fixed a critical bug that might’ve let attackers send spoofed emails. It took Google a whopping 137 days to close the bug after security researcher Allison Husain first reported it to the company.  Husain noted that the bug didn’t allow classic email spoofing where you can put any value in the sender’s field. But it could mimic any Gmail or GSuite user to send emails. The bug could also let attackers bypass protection protocols such as Sender Policy Framework (SPF) and Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting and Conformance (DMARC) that protect you… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Gmail,Google
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Yeah, you read that right, motherfucker! We’re on the scale game now and are here to reveal the relative (and absolute) weights of the most popular phones of 2019. Why? Damn, where’s your curiosity? Why not, pal? Aren’t you a bit interested to see if there’s any correlation or much variance between the weights of 2019’s most purchased devices? Thought so. Enough of this boring-ass info, let’s get into this. Methodology Getting hold of the data is a little bit of a minefield. Very few companies release accurate and specific sales figures, we have to go the analyst route instead. This… This story continues at The Next Web
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge One of the more hopeful developments at tech platforms this year has been their investment in removing misinformation related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter were all relatively quick to acknowledge the threat that COVID hoaxes represent, and have worked to purge it from their networks. Enforcement of those misinformation policies has sometimes lagged behind the companies’ public statements, though. A piece of anti-vaccination agitprop catchily titled “Plandemic” racked up millions of views before it was spotted and taken down by the platforms in May. More worryingly, a new piece of propaganda pushing a phony COVID cure was seen by 20 million people on Facebook alone before the company got it under control. On... Continue reading…
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Elon Musk’s companies have had their fair share of highs and lows in the public’s eyes but SpaceX may have lately taken the lion’s share of goodwill thanks to a series of successful launches and tests of its rockets and crew capsule. It was also the most recent recipient of some heavy criticism due to its Starlink satellites photobombing the … Continue reading
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A great shower head can make your morning routine more refreshing. We help you sort through the options to find one that will make getting clean feel wonderful.
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Epic says it was all set to offer a special Fortnite launcher on OnePlus and LG phones until Google interfered.
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This fall, thousands will show up to vote only to find out they’ve been purged. Lots of activists—and one Ohio man with lots of cats—are on a quest to fix that.
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Business Insider hosted a webinar with YouTube creators Ruby Asabor (176,000 subscribers) and Katy Bellotte (477,000 subscribers) on how they're making money and adapting as creators during the pandemic.  During the webinar, Asabor and Bellotte both told Business Insider's Amanda Perelli that finding a healthy work-life balance was a challenge they faced as influencers.  Blocking out time for self care and creating a schedule were the most important takeaways that they wanted to share with other creators who are navigating their time management.  Subscribe to Business Insider's influencer newsletter: Influencer Dashboard. For digital creators, managing time means finding a work-life balance when your life often becomes intertwined with your work, especially for lifestyle influencers. Between brand partnerships, scheduling posts, selling products, and creating content, influencers have to juggle many tasks at once.  In a webinar hosted by Business Insider's Amanda Perelli, we heard from two YouTube creators, Katy Bellotte (477,000 subscribers) and Ruby Asabor (140,000 subscribers). The two creators have built stable careers out of their YouTube videos and various side businesses. Bellotte started her YouTube channel when she was 14 years old and now she earns between $2,400 and $5,000 for sponsored Instagram posts, as well as monetizing her YouTube content.  Asabor's YouTube channel Lavish Ruby shares finance- and business-related content and she said she currently has 11 income streams between all her side hustles. Many successful influencers end up quitting their 9 to 5 jobs to go full time as creators on Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok. In doing so, they sometimes end up working more cumulative hours on their career than before, but in exchange, are pursuing their passions. "I always say, I feel like what I do on the internet and in my many side hustles and things that I have going on, I think I work more hours than I did ... when I was at my 9 to 5," Bellotte said. "In terms of hours, I'm working probably … from the second I wake up to when I'm scrolling on my phone at night." Like Bellotte, Asabor also finds herself working more than she would at a 9 to 5 job. "I have a lot going on, I have multiple businesses, and I have my YouTube channel of course," Asabor said. Her YouTube channel and businesses, including Lavish Life Academy (a program where she teaches financial and investment skills), require her to be constantly paying attention and be updating her viewers and students. "The only day I really give myself off is Saturday and that's because I'm forcing myself," she said. Finding work-life balance takes time to learn  "Our life becomes our work, which is kind of delicate territory when it comes to separating and finding a work-life balance," Bellotte said.  Although she's been working in content creation for over ten years, she's still learning how to find that balance and where "work ends ... and my normal life begins."  Asabor, who graduated from college in 2019 and has since been running her YouTube and small businesses full time, echoed a similar feeling. "Since college, I've always had a lot on my plate," she said. Self care needs to be a priority, even if that requires asking for help Both said that part of finding work-life balance and managing your time as creator depends on prioritizing mental health and self care.  "I need to budget time into my day to not work on anything," Bellotte said. Without self care, which can even just look like getting enough sleep every night, her work and her ability to help others around her were compromised.  "You have to understand when you need help," Asabor added. There are times where she even has her brother help remind her to eat lunch and take a break from working.  It's also important to create a schedule "Every single day, I have a specific topic," Asabor said. Mondays she has meetings with her interns where she assigns tasks. Tuesdays are her Lavish Life Academy days when she shares her webinars. Wednesdays are for follow-ups and business operations like managing product shipments.  Days dedicated to filming are also important to schedule, especially when sponsored content can take time to be approved by a brand, she said. Asabor recommends that creators plan out videos almost a month in advance and use a planner to outline the day-to-day and even week-to-week. To learn more about their influencer businesses, watch the full exclusive Business Insider webinar below:     Here are a few other topics covered in the webinar: How to price yourself as an influencer when landing a brand deal and ways to negotiate. How to start a Patreon, from pricing to choosing what to offer your followers.  Why it's important to have several different revenue streams as a creator, and a breakdown of how they make money through membership programs, YouTube revenue, and sponsorships.  How much time they spend each day and week working on their businesses, and tips for time management. Lessons for other digital creators who are just starting out in the industry.  Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How waste is dealt with on the world's largest cruise ship
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