Christopher Johnson

Christopher Johnson

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'A secure dev lifecycle has a much higher ROI than letting the public do the bug detection work for you' Microsoft's bug bounty program has exploded in terms of scope and payouts.…
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California's labor commissioner announced Wednesday that her office is suing Uber and Lyft, claiming the companies are stealing wages from drivers by "willfully misclassifying" them as contractors instead of employees. The suit alleges that Uber and Lyft have failed to pay drivers minimum wage, sick pay, unemployment, and other benefits guaranteed to employees under state law. AB-5, California's hotly debated gig economy law, created stricter requirements for companies seeking to designate workers as independent contractors. California's agency that oversees ride-hailing companies ruled that drivers are employees under the law, but the companies have refused to reclassify drivers, and the issue is now at the center of multiple lawsuits. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The heated legal battle between California and ride-hail giants Uber and Lyft ratcheted up another notch this week with the state's labor commissioner announcing that she plans to take the companies to court over their classification of drivers. Commissioner Lilia Garcia-Brower's office said in a press release Wednesday that it plans to file a lawsuit against the companies, arguing that they are "committing wage theft by willfully misclassifying drivers as independent contractors instead of employees." In a letter to Uber and Lyft drivers alerting them to the lawsuit, Garcia-Brower's office said that it's seeking to force the companies to reclassify drivers as employees and reimburse them for wages and other benefits that they would be entitled to as employees under state law. That list includes a wide variety of payments that Uber and Lyft have historically not paid to drivers, such as minimum wages based on time drivers spend using the app (not just driving passengers), overtime, sick pay, and business expenses. "The vast majority of California drivers want to work independently, and we've already made significant changes to our app to ensure that remains the case under state law," an Uber spokesperson told Business Insider, adding that the company hasn't been served with the lawsuit yet and therefore hasn't been able to review its specific claims. A Lyft spokesperson told Business Insider: "The state labor agency has botched thousands of claims. They know they don't have the ability to process these claims, so they sent them into a legal abyss, where they know it will take years to resolve them." California's landmark gig work law, AB-5, which went into effect this year, raised the bar companies must clear in order to consider workers as independent contractors, spurring a major battle between regulators and Uber and Lyft over whether drivers meet that bar. California's Public Utilities Commission, the agency responsible for overseeing ride-hail companies, dealt a significant blow to the companies earlier this year when it ruled in June that drivers are considered employees under AB-5. In May, a group of attorneys general from the state — in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego — also sued Uber and Lyft over the issue. Uber and Lyft have previously argued that AB-5 doesn't apply to them and have aggressively defended their classification of drivers by claiming that drivers prefer to work as contractors. Unlike their employee counterparts, contractors aren't guaranteed certain benefits like as healthcare and paid sick leave, and Uber and Lyft aren't bound by certain labor regulations around minimum wage payments or required pay payroll taxes for those workers, which feed into programs like unemployment insurance. Driver advocacy group Rideshare Drivers United, which has been rounding up driver wage theft accusations, claimed that Uber and Lyft owe more than $1.3 billion in payments to drivers in California. The debate over what wages and benefits gig economy companies should be on the hook for (versus workers or taxpayers) has intensified in recent months as more states and cities start cracking down on companies like Uber and Lyft. Massachusetts filed a similar lawsuit last month, while New York city imposed the country's first minimum wage for ride-hail drivers and Seattle has sought to do the same.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: The rise and fall of Donald Trump's $365 million airline
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The Supes are back for another season of Amazon's not-so-family-friendly superhero show.
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Hi! Welcome to the Insider Advertising daily for August 3. I'm Lauren Johnson, a senior advertising reporter at Business Insider. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. Send me feedback or tips at [email protected] Today: Advertisers return to Facebook, Netflix's new CMO Bozoma Saint John, and Microsoft reportedly eyes TikTok.   Advertisers not part of the boycott also cut back spending on Facebook in July, but the platform says it will be just fine July is over. So what was the upshot of the Facebook ad boycott? According to analytics firm Pathmatics, Facebook's top 1,000 advertisers spent far less on the platform in July compared to the same period a year ago, including some that didn't publicly join the boycott, reports Tanya Dua. But some boycotters like Hershey and North Face said they would resume spending on Facebook in August, and Facebook downplayed the boycott's impact. Read the full story here. How Netflix's new CMO Bozoma Saint John rose to become the biggest 'badass' in marketing Tanya Dua and Patrick Coffee profiled Netflix's incoming chief marketing officer Bozoma Saint John, who is known as a glamourous executive and uses her close ties to celebrities to work with brands like Pepsi and Apple. "There are some marketers that lead with logic and data, and there are other marketers that lead with instinct and culture; [Boz] sits far out on the instinct and culture side," said friend Jonathan Mildenhall, who is cofounder of consulting firm TwentyFirstCenturyBrand. Others warned that Saint John's growing personal brand could overshadow the companies she works at.  Read the full story here. Trump to reportedly order TikTok's owner ByteDance to sell its US operations On Friday, President Donald Trump reportedly planned to ask China's ByteDance to sell its US ownership of TikTok. It's unclear if Trump has power to order a foreign company to sell its ownership but the report comes on the heels of the Trump administration saying that it was considering banning TikTok because of the app's ties with China. ByteDance offered to 'divest' its stake in TikTok's US operations to avoid Trump ban. Fox Business Network reported that Microsoft is in talks to buy the stake. The New York Times also cited a person with knowledge of the talks between Microsoft and TikTok in a report. Read the full story here. More stories we're reading: Marvel insiders say they're skeptical of its recent pledge to improve diversity in its comics and company, after employing only 2 Black editorial staffers in the last 5 years (Business Insider) Disney Plus executive Agnes Chu is replacing Condé Nast Entertainment president Oren Katzeff, who made offensive jokes about women and people of color (Business Insider) Brands like Target and ASOS are doubling down on the pajama-inspired 'day gown' as Americans stuck home look to elevate their leisurewear (Business Insider) 'People were sick to their stomachs with his fake sincerity': Frustrated Amazon sellers slam Bezos for claiming his retail platform empowers small businesses (Business Insider) Peacock said it signed up 10 million users, but what marketers should watch for is time spent (Insider Intelligence) BuzzFeed starts selling products directly to consumers (Wall Street Journal) Pinterest surges on July sales lift as advertisers, users return (Bloomberg) Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at [email protected] and subscribe to this daily email here. — LaurenJoin the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
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The FDA has published an advisory warning that a new Salmonella outbreak has resulted in nearly 400 cases across the United States. Though the agency says that it and the CDC are still investigating and that a final conclusion isn’t yet available, the issue may be linked to onions from Thomson International. As a result, the company has recalled many … Continue reading
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Huawei has started teasing the launch of its MediaPad T8 Android tablet in India and is expected to launch within a few days.
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Google has just announced a major change on its YouTube platform. According to the company’s statement, the feature that allows viewers to add closed captioning ... The post YouTube will remove community contributions for closed captions and subtitles appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Disney dropped Beyonce's latest visual album Friday, but big questions hang over the fates of its Marvel live-action series and theatrical movies like Mulan. Here's everything to know.
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The Realme 6i will go on sale for the first time in India today. It will be available exclusively on Flipkart starting at Rs 12,999.
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Realme, the Chinese phenomenon, has been releasing a set of competitive smartphones and products to further establish its presence in the market. Now the company ... The post Realme V5 surfaces in leaked hands-on photos appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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(Graz University of Technology) "Core-shell" clusters pave the way for new efficient nanomaterials that make catalysts, magnetic and laser sensors or measuring devices for detecting electromagnetic radiation more efficient.
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Wednesday's unfocused hearing gave the billionaire the perfect opportunity to skate by — and he took it
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(University of South Australia) A new microchip that enables continuous monitoring of pH and chlorine levels in swimming pools will vastly improve water safety and hygiene for more than 2.7 million Australians as new research shows it can deliver consistent and accurate pool chemistry for reliable pool management.
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Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge BMW is developing an all-electric version of its 5 Series and 7 Series sedans as well as its entry-level X1 SUV, the company announced Monday as it detailed a renewed effort to reduce its overall emissions. That means almost all of the German luxury automaker’s most popular cars will soon have all-electric variants. A fully electric version of the 3 Series, BMW’s most popular car in the US, has already been spotted in testing camouflage, and the forthcoming BMW i4 is expected to slot into the 4 Series lineup. Earlier this month, the company revealed the production iX3, the all-electric version of its top-selling X3 SUV. BMW has also teased the iNext SUV, which appears similar to the slightly larger X5. To be sure, BMW won’t only sell... Continue reading…
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Already enjoyed on iOS, Read Later is coming to other platforms.
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Over 1,500 workers and contractors at Twitter have high-level privileges.
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Ming Zhao, CEO of PROVEN, an AI-powered skin care startup, explained how she tried to overcome Shark Tank's apparent aversion to supporting tech startups that had already raised.  "The sharks are not the most coddling of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs," based largely on the view that tech startup founders or entrepreneurs who are known to have more access to venture capital and other investors, and shouldn't be looking for funding on Shark Tank, she told Business Insider.  She also prepared to be called nasty names, including "gold-digger," which was what Mark Cuban called one entrepreneur in a 2017 episode. Another "shark," Kevin O'Leary, called the African-American founders of Lib Bar "colorful cockroaches." "I was definitely preparing for that having seen those episodes," Zhao told Business Insider. "I was afraid of being called a cockroach or a gold digger or any of those names." While the show's judges ultimately chose not to invest, Zhao says that being on the show was good exposure and led to customers and partners taking PROVEN  Click here for more BI Prime stories. Entrepreneur Ming Zhao, CEO of PROVEN, an AI-powered skin care startup, was excited to make an appearance on Shark Tank, though she knew she had to brace herself to be called nasty names — including "gold-digger" and cockroach. "Gold-digger" was how Mark Cuban, one of the show's judges, or "sharks," referred to entrepreneur Yunha Kim for seeking to raise more capital for her mediation app company in a 2017 episode. "Colorful cockroaches" was Kevin O'Leary's label during a 2018 episode for a group of African-American entrepreneurs who launched Lip Bar, a lipstick company.  "I was definitely preparing for that having seen those episodes," Zhao told Business Insider. "I was afraid of being called a 'cockroach' or a 'gold-digger' or any of those names." Zhao's startup uses AI and a proprietary database to formulate skin care products based on an individual's skin type and needs. The startup calls its product "the world's most personalized skin care" based on the Skin Genome Project, an award-winning skincare database. Zhao joined an open casting session for Shark Tank and was chosen to appear in an episode recently. She said she knew it was a big break for her startup, but she knew she wouldn't have to just explain her company's technology and business model. She would have to prepare for a grilling by the sharks, who are known for sometimes being mean-spirited and intense towards the entreprenuers on the show. The sharks did not invest in her startup, but she said being on the program gave them more visibility. In fact, her episode was recently re-broadcast "which means our show got pretty good accolades," she said. Preparing for a grilling The experience of Kim, a serial entrepreneur, in a 2017 Shark Tank episode, which can be viewed on YouTube, stood out for Zhao. During Kim's appearance, Cuban led the grilling, saying, "From an investment perspective, you don't need the cash." To his fellow host, Richard Branson, the Virgin Group founder, Cuban added, "She's a gold-digger." "No, she's not a gold-digger," Branson disagreed. "Did you just call me a gold-digger?" Kim asked smiling. "Yes," Cuban answered. Businessman Daymond John endorsed Cuban's argument as he pointed to where Kim was standing before the sharks, saying: "There are so many people around the country that stand on that carpet and they've busted their butt and they've mortgaged everything they have to hopefully get $200,000 to $300,000 to run their business. Every time somebody steps on this carpet with a couple of million dollars in the bank you take away the opportunity from somebody who may have lost their home or sold their kids college fund." Branson chimed in again to defend Kim, saying, "That's so unfair." Branson later recalled in a blog post how that comment led to a misunderstanding with Cuban, and said that they reconciled later. Zhao said studied that episode closely as she prepared for her own appearance: "They called the woman a 'gold-digger' because they were like, 'Oh, you know you don't you're not desperate for money, and there are all these other entrepreneurs who you know if they didn't have this money then they would go bankrupt' or something like that." Zhao knew she was in a similar situation since PROVEN had "already raised a healthy amount of seed money." That's shy decided to come up with "a few comebacks that I prepared beforehand." She said that had the sharks called her a "gold -igger" for seeking more startup capital, she would have responded: "This show is not a charity show. This is a show where great companies go to meet great investors, so that we can both grow and you know really bring these wonderful products to all of America. That's why I'm here." 'The sharks are not the most coddling of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs' As she expected, there was "a lot of commotion" among the sharks when she disclosed that the company had raised a few million dollars in capital. Ultimately, no one called Zhao a "gold digger" or any other name, but she said her experience underscored what she said Silicon Valley or tech entrepreneurs should understand about Shark Tank. "The sharks are not the most coddling of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs," based largely on the view that tech startup founders or entrepreneurs who are known to have more access to venture capital and other investors, and shouldn't be looking for funding on Shark Tank, she said.  Ultimately, she says, while the sharks chose not to invest, her appearance has had a "raw impact" on the startup's traffic, and reaffirms to their partners "that this is a legitimate business." "There's a lot of cascading benefits from that," she said. "Even our suppliers now take us more seriously because they all watch Shark Tank." Got a tip about PROVEN or another tech company? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @benpimentel or send him a secure message through Signal at (510) 731-8429. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Claim your 20% discount on an annual subscription to BI Prime by clicking here. SEE ALSO: These 5 tech giants could buy VMware if Dell chooses to sell the software giant, according to analysts: 'VMware would be a valuable property to any company in enterprise' SEE ALSO: The CTO of $6.8 billion AI startup Automation Anywhere explains why the hot startup is hiring despite the pandemic, including jobs that pay more than $200,000 a year Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
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Business Insider compiled a list of 53 of the most valuable enterprise technology startups in the US using data from technology market databases PitchBook and CB Insights. The list includes startups worth more than $1 billion that sell technologies such as cloud computing, software, and developer tools. The list turned up several cases of startups having to significantly cut staff, raise money at a lower valuation, or take other cost-saving measures to weather the pandemic. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The enterprise tech unicorn club is bigger than ever.  Business Insider compiled a list of 53 of the most valuable enterprise technology startups in the US using data from technology market databases PitchBook and CB Insights and found that they're collectively worth as much as $216 billion.  We've defined "enterprise technology" fairly broadly for the purposes of this list: We focused on startups valued at more than $1 billion that are largely selling their technology to other companies in areas including — but not limited to — cloud computing, software, and developer tools.  PitchBook provided a list of its top 30 venture-backed enterprise technologies companies in the US, but Business Insider's definition means that some companies on  the list, including SpaceX (valued at $35.8 billion), Waymo (valued at $30.75 billion), and DoorDash (valued at $16 billion) didn't make it onto this ranking. We also search CB Insights' database of private companies valued at $1 billion or more and searched for companies that matched our definition. Notably, the list of 53 enterprise startups includes only one led by a women: Magic Leap's newly appointed CEO Peggy Johnson, and she doesn't technically take over until next month. Silicon Valley Bank's 2019 Women in Technology Leadership study found that only 56% of startups have at least one woman executive and only 40 percent have at least one woman board director. Men of color and women of all backgrounds also typically have a harder time raising startup funding: Black-founded startups, for example, accounted for just 1% of venture-capital-backed companies between 2014 and 2019, as noted in a recent Business Insider story on the challenges Black entrepreneurs face. While enterprise startups are expected to be more insulated to the effects of the downturn than consumer technologies, our list turned up several cases of companies having to significantly cut staff, raise money at a lower valuation, or take other cost-saving measures to weather the pandemic, which we've noted accordingly.  Here are 53 of the most valuable enterprise technology startups, according to a Business Insider analysis of PitchBook and CB Insights estimates:SEE ALSO: Microsoft just surpassed $50 billion in annual commercial cloud revenue. Here are 24 of the most important executives leading Microsoft's cloud business as it takes on Amazon Web Services. Stripe: $36 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2009 Total raised: $1.89 billion as of April 2020 Employees: 2,500 as of May 2020 What it does: Stripe builds a digital payments platform used by companies including Airbnb, Amazon, and Target. Cofounder and president John Collison recently spoke to Business Insider about raising $600 million amid the pandemic, and signing new customers like Mattel and NBC. Source: PitchBook Palantir Technologies: $20.33 billion Headquarters: Palo Alto, California Year founded: 2004 Total raised: $3.35 billion as of July 2020 Employees: 2,500 as of May 2020 What it does: Historically secretive Palantir, which creates software to help companies manage and analyze data, is preparing to go public. It's best known for its cofounder, Peter Thiel, who is a Facebook board member and one of the biggest Donald Trump supporters in Silicon Valley, as Business Insider recently wrote in an in-depth explainer on the company. Source: PitchBook Snowflake: $12.4 billion Headquarters: San Mateo, California Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $1.4 billion as of  June 2020 Employees: 1,650 as of April 2020 What it does: Snowflake helps companies store and manage data in the cloud. The startup is reportedly planning to go public in the near future. "It's going to be the blockbuster enterprise listing for 2020," as one analyst recently told Business Insider. Source: PitchBook   UIPath: $10.2 billion Headquarters: New York, New York Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $1.2 billion as of July 2020 Employees: 3,000 as of July 2020 What it does: UIPath builds helps businesses automate common and routine tasks through a technology called robotic process automation (RPA). The startup is eyeing an IPO next year, as Business Insider recently reported. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Tanium: $9 billion Headquarters: Emeryville, California Year founded: 2007 Total raised: $837.08 million as of June 2020 Employees: 1,500 as of April 2020 What it does: Tanium is a cybersecurity firm that works to make companies more secure by protecting so-called "endpoints" like desktops, laptops, and mobile devices. Salesforce signed a deal with Tanium in February to keep company information secure during the shift to remote work, which raised Tanium's valuation to $9 billion. Source: PitchBook Automation Anywhere: $6.8 billion Headquarters: San Jose, California Year founded: 2003 Total raised: $840 million as of November 2019 Employees: 2,600 as of May 2020 What it does: Automation Anywhere is another RPA startup that helps companies automate repetitive tasks. CEO Mihir Shukla recently told Business Insider that the startup can now "automatically discover" business tasks to be automated. Source: PitchBook Magic Leap: Last known valuation was $6.69 billion in 2019 Headquarters: Plantation, Florida Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $3.48 billion as of May 2020 Employees: 1,500 as of June 2020 What it does: Once-hyped augmented reality startup Magic Leap is trying to reinvent itself after poor sales on its first product. Magic Leap laid off almost half its workforce in April, announced a pivot to the enterprise market, and just hired Microsoft's former top dealmaker Peggy Johnson as CEO. Magic Leap raised $350 million in May amid the challenges, but it's unclear at what valuation.  Source: PitchBook Unity: $6.28 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2004 Total raised: $699 million as of July 2019 Employees: 3,200 as of June 2020. What it does: Unity Technologies makes a game engine and software tools that power a handful of popular games including "Pokémon Go" and "Mario Kart Tour." In July, the company announced plans to go public. Source: PitchBook Samsara: $5.4 billion, down from $6.3 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2015 Total raised: $930 million as of May 2020 Employees: 1,350 as of July 2020 What it does: Samsara builds sensors and cloud software for so-called "Internet of Things" connected devices and applications. While the startup is still one of the most valuable in the enterprise technology market, it's faced recent challenges. The San Francisco Business Times reported in May that Samsara laid off 300 employees — about 18% of its workforce — and raised $400 million in funding at a lower valuation than it previously held, citing the economic crisis caused by the pandemic. Samsara confirmed the report to Business Insider, which a spokesperson said was to "ensure we can operate sustainably and reach full profitability, even under the worst case economic conditions or if a recession lasts for years." Source: PitchBook Plaid: $5.3 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $309.3 million as of January 2020 Employees: 500 as of July 2020 What it does: Plaid's payment infrastructure software connects users' bank accounts to financial applications like Robinhood and Credit Karma. Visa in January announced plans to acquire the company for a whopping $5.3 billion. Source: PitchBook HashiCorp: $5.27 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $349.53 million as of March 2020 Employees: 1,000 as of June 2020 What it does: HashiCorp sells a slew of cloud tools that assist in solving security and operational issues for cloud infrastructure developers. As for HashiCorp's future plans, CEO Dave McJannet recently told Business Insider it intends to be "large standalone independent company." Source: PitchBook Procore: $4.85 billion Headquarters: Carpinteria, California Year founded: 2003 Total raised: $640 million as of April 2020 Employees: 1,911 as of December 2019 What it does: Procore builds construction management software intended to simplify everyday tasks for construction workers, like creating job site schedules. Procore had plans to go public, according to Bloomberg, but has postponed those plans and instead completed a $150 million funding round in April. Source: PitchBook Toast POS: $4.9 billion Headquarters: Boston, Massachusetts Year founded: 2011 Total raised: $897.25 million as of February 2020 Employees: 3,000 in February, before cutting "roughly 50 percent through layoffs and furloughs" in April. Current employee count unclear. What it does: Toast makes software for restaurants and had to cut half its staff in April after the coronavirus crisis hit the restaurant industry hard. The company had raised $400 million just before the crisis, and if it had not raised that round in February, it'd be in big trouble," investor Mitchell Green of Lead Edge Capital told Business Insider around the time of the layoffs. Source: PitchBook Zenefits: Last known valuation $4.5 billion in 2015. Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2013 Total raised: $598.27 million as of March 2019 Employees: 450 as of May 2020 What it does: Zenefits offers human resources and payroll software for small and medium companies. As Business Insider reporter Rob Price writes, Zenefits was once one of the buzziest startups in Silicon Valley but dealt with various scandals and ultimately saw its valuation drop to $2 billion in 2016, replaced its CEO, and was fined by California regulators. Zenefits has laid off 15% of its staff in April; its current valuation is unknown. Source: PitchBook Airtable: Up to $4 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $170 million as of November 2018 Employees: 70 as of November 2018 What it does: Airtable builds tools to make it easier for people to build software applications without knowing how to code. Airtable CEO Howie Liu told Business Insider in March that the company has quadrupled its revenue since it raised a $100 million Series C round of funding in 2018, but declined to give actual figures. CB Insights lists Airtable's valuation as $1.1 billion, what it was valued at the time of its last funding round in 2018, but PitchBook estimates the company is worth as much as $4 billion.  Source: PitchBook and CB Insights     TripActions: $4 billion Headquarters: Palo Alto, California Year founded: 2015 Total raised: $125 million as of June 2020 Employees: 900 as of June 2020 What it does: TripActions helps customers plan and pay for business trips without having to go through the arduous approval and reimbursement process that most companies use.  TripActions has faced challenges during the pandemic. As Business Insider's Megan Hernbroth writes, it cut roughly one-fourth of its global workforce in March, slashed benefits, closed offices, and cut its cofounders' pay in half. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Gusto: $3.8 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2011 Total raised: $200 million as of July 2019 Employees: 800 as of May 2020 What it does: Gusto makes human resources software for small businesses.  Source: PitchBook Freshworks: $3.5 billion Headquarters: San Mateo, California Year founded: 2010 Total raised: $401.1 million as of November 2019 Employees: 3,000 as of June 2020 What it does: Freshworks builds customer relationship management software. CEO Girish Mathrubootham recently told Business Insider the company has pledged not to hold any layoffs during the pandemic, though it has paused hiring. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Rubrik: $3.3 billion Headquarters: Palo Alto, CA Year founded: 2014 Total raised: $553 million as of March 2020 Employees: 1,700 as of March 2020 What it does: Rubrik builds a cloud data management platform.  Source: PitchBook and CB Insights C3.ai: Up to $3.3 billion Headquarters: Redwood City, California Year founded: 2009 Total raised: $355.74 million as of September 2019 Employees: 500 as of April 2020 What it does: C3.ai provides artificial intelligence-based tools to help companies with tasks such as fraud detection and energy management. C3.ai CEO Tom Siebel recently told Business Insider that the startup brought in $160 million in revenue last year, but won't go public until the economy is fully recovered. PitchBook puts the company's valuation at $3.3 billion while CB Insights puts it at $1.4 billion. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Netskope: $2.8 billion Headquarters: Santa Clara, California Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $744.3 million as of February 2020 Employees: 1,000 as of July 2020 What it does: Netskope builds a cloud security platform to help companies monitor how employees are using cloud software such as Slack and Google Drive — and make it more secure. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights GitLab: $2.75 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2011 Total raised: $413.82 million as of September 2019 Employees: 1,200 as of June 2020 What it does: Gitlab is a code-collaboration platform that rivals Microsoft-owned GitHub. GitLab in April said it would close job postings and only hire for critical positions to save money amid the coronavirus crisis. Source: PitchBook OneTrust: $2.7 billion Headquarters: Atlanta, Georgia Year founded: 2016 Total raised: $420.9 million as of July 2020 Employees: 1,500 as of May 2020 What it does: OneTrust builds a platform intended to help companies manage data privacy. The company in February told Business Insider that a recent California data privacy law was a big boost to its business. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Cohesity: $2.5 billion Headquarters: San Jose, California Year founded: 2013 Total raised: $661 million as of April 2020 Employees: 1,300 as of May 2020 What it does: Cohesity builds a platform for storing and managing company data. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Collibra: $2.36 billion US headquarters: New York, New York Year founded: 2008 Total raised: $389.96 million as of March 2020 Employees: 655 as of March 2020 What it does: Collibra builds a platform to help companies manage, track, and learn from their data. CEO Felix Van de Maele told Business Insider in April that he expects demand for data services to continue despite cuts to IT budgets during the pandemic. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Uptake: Last known valuation was $2.3 billion in 2017. Headquarters: Chicago, Illinois Year founded: 2014 Total raised: $293 million as of December 2018 Employees: 750 as of February 2018 What it does: Uptake builds a predictive analytics platform to help companies gain insights from their data. The company was valued at $2.3 billion back in 2017. Crain's Chicago Business recently reported that Uptake had cut jobs as recently as December. Uptake has yet to respond to an email from Business Insider. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights ServiceTitan: $2.25 billion Headquarters: Glendale, California Year founded: 2007 Total raised: $399.78 million as of May 2020 Employees: 900 as of May 2020 What it does: ServiceTitan provides cloud software for residential home services businesses, like home repairs and housecleaning. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Figma: $2.05 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $132.87 million as of April 2020 Employees: 209 as of April 2020 What it does: Figma is a project management tool for digital product designers. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Postman: $2 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2014 Total raised: $208 million as of June 2020 Employees: 250 as of June 2020 What it does: Postman builds a collaboration platform offering application programming interfaces (APIs) that's used by Microsoft, Twitter, and Cisco. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Auth0: $1.92 billion Headquarters: Bellevue, Washington Year founded: 2013 Total raised: $333.47 million as of July 2020 Employees: 700 as of July 2020 What it does: Auth0 is a cybersecurity software startup that manages user authentication and secures the login pages for large consumer and enterprise businesses. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights RigUp: $1.84 billion Headquarters: Austin, Texas Year founded: 2014 Total raised: $517.5 million as of March 2020 Employees: 180 as of March 2020 What it does: RigUp builds hiring and payroll software for the oil and gas industry. The startup laid off 25% of its staff in March. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Sprinklr: Last known valuation was $1.81 billion in 2016. Headquarters: New York, New York Year founded: 2009 Total raised: $228.5 million as of June 2017 Employees: 1,800 as of May 2020 What it does: Sprinklr builds a platform to help enterprise businesses manage social media. Back early 2019, Sprinklr told Business Insider that it hit between $250 million to $300 million in revenue and was preparing to go public. It's been mostly quiet since. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Afiniti: $1.8 billion Headquarters: Washington, DC Year founded: 2006 Total raised: $377.43 million as of July 2020 Employees: 1,000 as of June 2018 What it does: Afiniti builds an artificial intelligence and analytics platform that it says is used by companies in industries including telecommunications, financial services, and health care. The company is valued at $1.8 billion, according to CB Insights. PitchBook lists a $100 million valuation from October 2014. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Verkada: $1.6 billion Headquarters: San Mateo, California Year founded: 2016 Total raised: $149.8 million as of January 2020 Employees: 380 as of January 2020 What it does: Verkada sells security cameras and software to help enterprise secure physical offices. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Dataminr: $1.6 billion Headquarters: New York, New York Year founded: 2009 Total raised: $572.37 million as of October 2019 Employees: 650 as of April 2020 What it does: Dataminr has an artificial intelligence platform to track social media and has customers including American Airlines, McDonalds, and Home Depot. The Intercept recently reported that Dataminr helped police monitor protests following the police killing of George Floyd. Source: CB Insights Xant.ai: $1.58 billion Headquarters: Provo, Utah Year founded: 2004 Total raised: $299.3 million as of February 2020 Employees: 146 as of April 2020 What it does: Xant.ai builds a cloud sales platform that integrates with customer relationship management software. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Podium: $1.5 billion Headquarters: Lehi, Utah Year founded: 2014 Total raised: $221.89 million as of April 2020 Employees: 750 employees as of June 2020 What it does: As Business Insider's Ben Pimentel writes, Podium builds a platform to makes it easier for a local business to communicate with customers, via email or text, and ask them to post a review on most of the popular review sites, such as Yelp and Google Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Asana: $1.5 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2008 Total raised: $213.51 million as of February 2020 Employees: 700 as of January 2020 What it does: Asana builds task management software to help teams keep track of work. Asana confidentially filed for an initial public offering with the SEC in February and plans to go public this year. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Segment: $1.5 billion Headquarters: San Francisco, California Year founded: 2011 Total raised: $283.6 million as of April 2019 Employees: 500 as of March 2020 What it does: Segment builds data management and analysis software to help companies manage customer data. Segment cut more than 50 jobs from its workforce in May ,as Business Insider reported, citing as the pandemic-caused downturn. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Cybereason: $1.5 billion Headquarters: Boston, Massachusetts Year founded: 2012 Total raised:$390 million of August 2019 Employees: 500 in January 2020 What it does: Softbank-banked Cybereason sells software to secures a company's network and the devices connected to it, like phones, laptops, and desktop computers, as Business Insider's Rosalie Chan writes. CB Insights lists a $1.5 billion valuation for the company while PitchBook lists a $1 billion valuation. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights JFrog: Up to $1.5 billion Headquarters: Sunnyvale, California Year founded: 2008 Total raised: $228 million as of October 2019 Employees: 600 as of April 2020 What it does: DevOps startup JFrog builds a platform to help companies manage software updates. JFrog cofounder and CEO Shlomi Ben Haim recently told Business Insider that it could go public as soon as this year. PitchBook lists a $426.85 million valuation for JFrog as of October 2019 while CB Insights values it at $1.5 billion. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Dataiku: $1.4 billion Headquarters: New York, New York Year founded: 2013 Total raised: $147.3 million as of January 2020 Employees: 400 as of February 2020 What it does: Dataiku's machine learning software helps companies turn large amounts of data into concrete insights. CB Insights lists Dataiku's valuation as $1.4 billion while PitchBook lists it as of November 2018 as $671 million. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Outreach: $1.33 billion Headquarters: Seattle, Washington Year founded: 2011 Total raised: $287.96 million as of June 2020 Employees: 550 as of June 2020 What it does: Outreach is a sales automation startup that helps salespeople engage with customers more effectively by helping them determine the best action to take with prospective customers. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Docker: $1.3 billion Headquarters: Palo Alto, California Year founded: 2010 Total raised: $314.81 million as of November 2019 Employees: 500 as of September 2019 What it does: Docker builds a container platform intended to make collaboration easier for coders. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Actifio: As much as $1.3 billion Headquarters: Waltham, Massachusetts Year founded: 2009 Total raised: $461.13 million as of August 2018 Employees: 427 as of January 2020 What it does: Actifio creates enterprise cloud data management software. CB Insights lists Actifio's value as $1.1 billion and PitchBook estimates it is $1.3 billion. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Qumulo: $1.2 billion Headquarters: Seattle, Washington Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $363.01 million as of July 2020 Employees: 315 as of July 2020 What it does: Qumulo is a hybrid cloud storage startup that helps customers manage data inside their own data centers and the cloud. Qumulo more than doubled its valuation in a recent funding round and told Business Insider that it shows how investors are betting big on digital transformation amid the pandemic. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights FiveTran: $1.2 billion Headquarters: Oakland, California Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $163.12 million as of June 2020 Employees: 350 as of June 2020 What it does: FiveTran builds a platform to bring together all of a company's data into a single dashboard. Source: CB Insights VAST Data: $1.2 billion Headquarters: New York, New York Year founded: 2016 Total raised: $180 million as of April 2020 Employees: 145 as of April 2020 What it does: As Business Insider's Joe Williams writes, VAST Data builds a storage solution intended to make it easier for companies to quickly and continuously analyze large sets of information. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights DigitalOcean: $1.15 billion Headquarters: New York, New York Year founded: 2011 Total raised: $595.6 million as of May 2020 Employees: 563 as of May 2020 What it does: Cloud computing company DigitalOcean competes with the big providers like Amazon Web Services, Microsoft, and Google, but targets small and medium businesses. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights SentinelOne: $1.1 billion Headquarters: Mountain View, California Year founded: 2013 Total raised: $429.52 million as of February 2020 Employees: 500 as of April 2020 What it does: SentinelOne is a cybersecurity startup that helps companies protect devices and servers. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Sumo Logic: $1.19 billion Headquarters: Redwood City, California Year founded: 2010 Total raised: $345.5 million as of May 2019 Employees: 735 as of November 2019 What it does: Sumo Logic helps developers secure cloud software. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights Icertis: $1.15 billion Headquarters: Bellevue, Washington Year founded: 2009 Total raised: $171.5 million as of July 2019 Employees: 1,000 as of June 2020 What it does:Icertis builds a platform to help customers manage contracts in the cloud, which its leaders say increases a company's capacity for contracts, ensures those contracts comply with regulations and policies and reduces costs. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights DataRobot: $1.3 billion Headquarters: Boston, Massachusetts Year founded: 2012 Total raised: $431.11 million as of September 2019 Employees: 1,200 as of February 2020 What it does:DataRobot builds a machine learning automation platform to help companies build artificial intelligence tools. Source: PitchBook and CB Insights
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The carrier is also adding 5G access to its cheapest unlimited plan.
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Katie Price has said she “can’t stop smiling” after her son Harvey was discharged from hospital. The 18-year-old was rushed to hospital earlier this month with a fever and difficulty breathing, and it was later revealed that he had been taken into the intensive care unit, where he remained for a number of days.After leaving ICU over the weekend, Katie has now confirmed Harvey has been allowed to go home. She told The Sun on Tuesday night: “It feels like Christmas. I can’t stop smiling.“The day started badly but it’s ending as the best day ever.”A rep for Katie added to Metro: “Harvey is headed home. Katie is naturally delighted.”Katie has been keeping fans updated on Harvey’s condition on social media over the last few days. Last week, she confirmed Harvey had been tested for coronavirus, but the result had come back negative.On Saturday, she posted a video of the two of them in hospital, in which Harvey – who has Prader-Willi syndrome and autism – then expressed his thanks to his supporters, and agreed with his mum that he was doing “a lot better”. View this post on InstagramA post shared by Katie Price (@katieprice) on Jul 18, 2020 at 11:40am PDTHarvey being discharged from hospital came just hours after Katie virtually attended a bankruptcy hearing. The reality star was declared bankrupt in November last year and discussed her current financial status and assets at Tuesday’s hearing at the insolvency and companies court at the Rolls Building in London. She told the court she owns a house but is currently living in a rented property and has a Beetle car, one horse and one pony, but nothing else.Katie, who was once reported to be worth £40 million, said: “I haven’t got anything, I haven’t got absolutely anything left, everything has been stolen off me.”She said she had been burgled and cannot get any insurance, adding: “I’ve lost everything.”However, the court heard that the star had average recent monthly earnings of £45,000. READ MORE: Katie Price Tells Bankruptcy Hearing: 'I’ve Lost Everything' Katie Price Praises Ex Peter Andre For 'Stepping Up' Amid Her Son Harvey's Health Scare Katie Price Says Harvey Is Doing 'A Lot Better' As He Thanks Supporters In Video Message
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The LG Velvet is a sleek, stylish device, but you'll still want to protect it. Here are the best LG Velvet cases!
UK
It's not the same, but it might keep you going until something better fills the vacuum left in Dark Sky's wake.
UK
Plus: Kazakh man charged with corporate mega-hack, and more In brief  With world+dog on Zoom these days, news of a zero-day attack against the videoconferencing app would cause a stir, but relax – it's only if you're on Windows 7 or older.…
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Poco’s first budget smartphone, the M2 Pro will go on sale for the first time in India. It will be available on Flipkart starting at Rs 13,999.
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It’s been a while since we’ve heard any major news from the company that started the whole action camera market. That doesn’t mean GoPro is out of the picture, no pun intended. It has yet to launch a major action cam after launching a number of accessories and it isn’t doing that today either. Instead, it is putting its current … Continue reading
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In a year that has seen the largest measles outbreak in the US in more than two decades, the role of social media in giving a platform to unscientific anti-vaccine messages and organizations has become a flashpoint.In the first study of public health-related Facebook advertising, newly published in the journal Vaccine, researchers at the University of Maryland, the George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University show that a small group of anti-vaccine ad buyers has successfully leveraged Facebook to reach targeted audiences and that the social media platform's efforts to improve transparency have actually led to the removal of ads promoting vaccination and communicating scientific findings.The research calls attention to the threat of social media misinformation as it may contribute to increasing "vaccine hesitancy," which the World Health Organization ranks among the top threats to global health this year.This increasing reluctance or refusal to vaccinate threatens to reverse the progress made in halting vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, which has seen a 30% increase in cases globally.The research team, co-led by UMD's Dr. Sandra C. Quinn, GW's Dr. David Broniatowski and JHU's Dr. Mark Dredze, examined more than 500 vaccine-related ads served to Facebook users and archived in Facebook's Ad Library.This archive, which became available in late 2018, catalogued ad content related to "issues of national importance."
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It doesn’t always take the drama of a zero-day vulnerability like we saw in September to get our attention.And the second, (CVE-2019-1457) is a publicly reported exploit in Microsoft Excel.Second, the IT department doesn’t have to rush out urgent fixes and can take the time to properly test and stage their desktop and server platform changes.You can find out more with our helpful infographic found here.Microsoft has documented a few known issues for this November Patch Tuesday, which we have broken down into two sections including:[ Got a spare hour?
China
SoftBank-owned Z Holdings, the operator of search engine Yahoo Japan, is in discussions to merge with instant messaging app Line, a move set to create a wider tech group spanning from financial services and ecommerce, among others.Z Holdings, which recently changed its name from Yahoo Japan, confirmed that talks regarding the merger are already underway, though nothing is final.SoftBank, which owns 44% of Z Holdings, also confirmed the said discussions, Reuters reported.Line, which sold a majority stake in its mobile unit to SoftBank last year, also said in a statement that it is considering ways to strengthen its corporate value, but indicated that no plans are concrete.Sources previously told Reuters that the deal could see SoftBank and South Korean internet powerhouse Naver (Line’s parent company) setting up a 50/50 joint venture that would control Z Holdings, which would then hold Line and Yahoo.The two companies are likely to reach a basic agreement by the end of November, according to the sources.
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