David Carter

David Carter

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NASA's Dawn spacecraft reveals the secrets of Ceres' bright spots, discovering robust evidence for an ocean hiding below its surface.
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Illustration by William Joel / The Verge Chilling effect go brr Continue reading…
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(Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) For years, scientists have attributed animal behavior to the coordinated activities of neuronal cells and its circuits of neurons, known as the neuronal network (NN). However, researchers are pushing the boundaries in understanding animal behavior through the integration of gene regulation.
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Google Docs just became much more useful if you're on the move and don't have much time to type.
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VC experts talked about how COVID-19 is changing the venture capital industry on Wednesday in an online panel discussion hosted by PitchBook and the National Venture Capital Association. The economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic has led firms to put less money into small, risky startups, and direct more towards established, stable companies. Such strategies run the risk of eventually drying up the pipeline of new ideas that VC firms at every stage of the funding process rely on. But it can be hard for firms to focus on smaller startups when so many resources are already wrapped up in larger portfolio companies. The loss of traditional meetings has led VCs to find new ways of building trust with founders, like socially distanced gatherings and increased background checks. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Industry experts got frank about the current state of venture investing amidst COVID-19 during a panel discussion Wednesday hosted by PitchBook and the National Venture Capital Association. Cameron Stanfill of PitchBook, Jennifer Friel Goldstein of Silicon Valley Bank, and Matthew Lee of Certent fielded questions and talked about how the economic fallout of the pandemic has reshaped traditional funding patterns. As uncertainty grips Silicon Valley, investors have increasingly put less money into small, risky startups and directed more towards larger companies with longer track records. Goldstein acknowledged that might be bad for innovation long-term, but said she had faith in the ability of founders to find new sources of cash — possibly from other private investors. "Innovators still start companies," Goldstein said, "so the sources of capital may start to look a little different." Still, Goldstein acknowledged that the venture capital industry as a whole could suffer later if interest in earlier stage ventures dries up significantly now. "I would expect that some of the later stage funds eventually are going to need to deal with their own pipeline and supply concerns," Goldstein said. "If everybody is only investing in late-stage, there are not going to be interesting mid-stage companies for them to invest in." But the lure of a safe bet is understandable during economically uncertain times, Stanfill said.  "The late-stage companies in VCs' portfolios are likely where they have a lot of value, still wrapped up in companies like that," Stanfill said. "And so making sure those companies are healthy, are raising extra capital to extend their runway, make sure they're going to come through this crisis stronger than ever — that's one reason you're seeing a lot of deals come that way." The panel also noted that the social isolation of COVID-19 has forced a change in the way venture capitalists build relationships, at a time when they can rarely rely on their usual face-to-face meetings to make gut calls on founders.  "VCs needed to start to innovate, to think about, 'how am I going to get over this historic need to meet someone in person to get a good sense of who they are?'" Goldstein said. "And we started to see the introduction of the socially distanced walk, the cocktail hour, a cooking class with these potential entrepreneurs." That same need for trust has also driven a rise in background checks and reference checks, Goldstein said.SEE ALSO: Big venture capital firms benefited most from a record fundraising pace in the first half of 2020, but smaller VC firms may face a tough second half, a Silicon Valley Bank report says Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What it takes to be a PGA Tour caddie
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(Purdue University) A new computational tool developed by researchers from Purdue University and MIT could help better determine which drugs should move from animal testing to humans. It could also sooner detect a reason why a drug might fail, guiding how a clinical trial should be set up.
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With the pandemic increasing the amount of food delivery and hurting restaurants' bottom lines, buzzy ghost kitchens see an opportunity to grow.  The category had already attracted a lot of interest, notably from Uber co-founder and former-CEO Travis Kalanick, who launched CloudKitchens in 2016.  We compiled 14 of the biggest players in the ghost kitchen world to show the international scope of the budding space. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The pandemic has closed thousands of restaurants, many for good, while food delivery volume is increasing substantially. Much of the country reopening indoor dining, but Opentable is reporting that the amount of seated diners continues to substantially underperform last year.  Ghost kitchens, a buzzy class of startups, were already betting that delivery would grow in market share, attracting founders including billionaire Uber ex-CEO Travis Kalanick, but the rapid increase in delivery demand has accelerated their growth.  These companies operate a kitchen that hosts multiple restaurants or menus, from which they only do delivery orders (or sometimes pick up). Some run their own food brands, while others partner with local chefs or established delivery brands.  While American startup hotbeds like Silicon Valley and New York have seen multiple ghost kitchen startups, this trend is worldwide, with Dubai, India, and Western Europe emerging as other areas that have spawned multiple startups.  "Every single restaurant globally became a ghost kitchen overnight," Corey Manicone, CEO and cofounder of Zuul Kitchens, told Business Insider. He said that the pandemic has accelerated the concept by three to five years, but that there's a lot of growth ahead.  "We're at the same place as e-commerce in the early 2000s," he said.  Money continues to flow into the space: both Zuul and hotel-focused ghost kitchen Butler Hospitality raised money in July, $9 million and $15 million respectively. Karma Kitchen, a UK based kitchen, recently raised $318 million as well.  In a time of economic contraction, the model makes a lot of sense for restauranteurs. Real estate and labor costs can be pooled across multiple restaurants, lowering the amount of square footage and the number of employees a restaurant needs. Less overhead, with the same amount of income.  Read more: Bond, which has raised $15 million from investors including Lightspeed, wants to become the Shopify of logistics by turning vacant retail space into warehouses The pandemic's impact on retail space, including restaurant space, has also been a boon for the industry. Firms convert restaurant space, underutilized retail space, and occasionally industrial space into ghost kitchens. Two of those three categories, retail and restaurants, are having an outsized negative effect from the pandemic, which leads to a glut of supply for ghost kitchens. While real-estate firms may not have originally planned to bring ghost kitchens into their space, the bottoming out of demand from traditional tenants has opened many up to the business.  "A lot of these development companies, larger landholders, and real-estate firms are taking a forward-looking, reset view of what is the best way to optimize their holdings for the future," Jim Collins, founder and CEO of Kitchen United, told Business Insider.  We've created a list of 14 of the hottest startups in the space, highlighting where they've received money and what's different about their concept. SEE ALSO: Bond, which has raised $15 million from investors including Lightspeed, wants to become the Shopify of logistics by turning vacant retail space into warehouses SEE ALSO:  Butler Hospitality Money raised: $20.2 million Investors: Mousse Partners, The Kraft Group, Entrepreneurs Roundtable Accelerator, &vest, Scopus Ventures, Loeb.nyc Cities / Countries it operates in: NYC, expanding to Chicago, Miami, Washington DC What it does: Butler Hospitality, founded in 2015, puts a twist on the classic ghost kitchen model, delivering room service at multiple hotels across New York. What makes it different: According to founder and CEO Tim Gjonbalic, hotels lose a lot of money on food and room service, but need it in order to bag high-paying business travel clients and conference and event clients.  While hotels have been hit hard, Gjonbalic believes that this will actually be a boon to his business, as they'll look to cut costs, focusing on food and beverage first.  "The only way for our clients to get contracts for the National Guard at the Javitt Center or for visiting nurses was to make sure there's food and beverage for them," Gjonbalic told Business Insider.  CloudKitchens Money raised: $400 million Investors: Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund Cities / Countries it operates in: US, China, India, and Europe What it does: CloudKitchens was founded in 2016 by former Uber CEO and co-founder Travis Kalanick. The company is quite secretive and doesn't advertise locations or conduct interviews. The company operates its own brands, with names like " B*tch Don't Grill My Cheese," and has locations in the US, China, India, and Europe. What makes it different: The most major difference is Travis Kalanick and the Saudi Arabian sovereign wealth fund. Saudi Arabia was a long time backer of Uber.  The Wall Street Journal has reported that the company has made roughly 10 acquisitions of ghost kitchen competitors around the world, and has bought over 100 properties globally, but didn't report actual locations and asset types.  Deliveroo Money raised: $1.5 billion Investors: Amazon, Fidelity Management and Research Company, T. Rowe Price, Accel, Index Ventures and other Cities / Countries it operates in: UK What it does: Deliveroo is one of the largest food delivery services in the UK. The company has also been dipping its toes into ghost kitchens for a few years, setting up shop in converted shipping containers in parking lots.  What makes it different: Deliveroo isn't the only delivery service to try the ghost kitchen business. Uber Eats launched a location in Paris in 2018, but then closed it at the end of 2019.  Karma Kitchen Money raised: $318 million Investors: Vengrove Asset Management Cities / Countries it operates in: London What it does: Karma Kitchen was founded in 2018 by two sisters, Eccie and Gini Newton, and earlier this month raised a massive $318 million series A funding round from industrial-focused real estate firm Vengrove Asset Management. The company works with other brands, that can rent out space for as little as $53 a shift. As of now, they have one location in London, but the company is expected to open two more locations in the city and plans to expand across Europe. What makes it different: While Karma Kitchen seems to follow a pretty traditional ghost kitchen model at the moment, their partnership with Vengrove implies that the company might continue to dig into industrial space.  Read more: A flexible leasing company — think Classpass for apartments — is expanding to cities like Denver and Atlanta after building a C-suite with former WeWork and Airbnb execs Keatz Money raised: Roughly $23 million  Investors: Atlantic Food Lab, U-Start, K Fund, Project A Ventures, JME Ventures, Marco Valta Cities / Countries it operates in: Berlin, Amsterdam, Madrid, Barcelona, and Munich What it does: Keatz was founded in Berlin in 2016 and has now grown to ten different cloud kitchens. The company develops its own brands and menus, and has focused on providing food that can easily be delivered. What makes it different: Keatz's range of locations across European cities gives it access to a wide range of markets.  Kitchen United Money raised: $50 million Investors: GV (Google Ventures), RXR Realty, Fidelity, DivcoWest, G Squared Cities / Countries it operates in: Chicago, Pasadena, Scottsdale, and Austin, expanding to locations like New York City and Los Angeles What it does: Jim Collins, the founder of Kitchen United, worked in tech until he decided to open up his own restaurant in 2014. "I thought I would prematurely age less if I bought and ran my own restaurant," Collins told Business Insider. The stress of running a kitchen changed that dream for him very quickly.  By 2017, he founded Kitchen United, after seeing the challenges that his restaurant had in the face of increasing delivery demand. The company started with one location in Pasadena in 2017, and has now grown to four locations. Kitchen United partners with other brands, instead of creating its own. What makes it different: The company's funders include RXR Realty, a forward-thinking real estate owner and operator, and GV, Google's venture arm. This combination gives the company access to leaders in both real estate and tech, a big advantage in the ghost kitchen world.  Kitopi Money raised: $89 Million Investors: BECO Capital, VentureSouq, Crescent Enterprises, MSA Capital, Reshape, and more Cities / Countries it operates in: Dubai, Abu Dhabi, London, Kuwait, Riyadh, and New York What it does: Kitopi, founded in Dubai in 2018, has grown substantially across the Middle East, and launched in New York in late 2019. The company announced this March that it would partner with Nathan's Famous Hot Dogs to deliver across New York City.  The company works with restaurants to deliver food out of their ghost kitchens, using Kitopi's own chefs to prepare the food. What makes it different: The company plans to grow rapidly. When the company announced its fundraising round in February of this year,  it also announced that it planned to open 50 locations in the US and 100 globally by the end of 2020. Rebel Foods Money raised: $342.3 million Investors: Sequoia Capital, Lightbox, Coatue Management, Goldman Sachs and more Cities / Countries it operates in: 35 cities across India and Dubai What it does: Faasos, an Indian company founded in 2011, began life as a fast-food restaurant that focused on Indian food specifically. The company scored an early investment from Silicon Valley power players Sequoia Capital, and eventually renamed itself to Rebel Foods.  The company switched from traditional restaurants to delivery-only ghost kitchens, spinning off Faasos as one brand under the Rebel Foods banner in 2015. What makes it different: Rebel Foods now has more than 320 ghost kitchens across 35 cities in India, as well as in Dubai, and is the largest cloud kitchen operator in the world.  Read more: Logistics startup Bond has teamed up with SoftBank-backed REEF Technology to bring nano-warehouses to parking lots across the US. Here's how they're building the distribution hubs of the future. REEF Technology Money raised: Undisclosed Investors: Softbank Cities / Countries it operates in: Mainly the US and Canada, but expanding to Europe What it does: REEF Technology is the company's largest parking lot operator, but it doesn't picture itself as a parking company, instead using parking to  "transform underutilized urban spaces into neighborhood hubs that connect people to locally curated goods, services, and experiences,' according to its website. The company does that by providing space for light logistics companies, like its partnership with Bond, and by creating their own ghost kitchens, or in REEF parlance, REEF Neighborhood Kitchens.  What makes it different: REEF, founded in 2013 as ParkJockey, now owns 4,500 parking lots, making it able to rapidly scale up according to demand. The company partners with local restauranteurs to launch in new locations, instead of operating its own brands.  Star Kitchens Money raised: N/A Investors: N/A Cities / Countries it operates in: China What it does: Star Kitchens is quite different from others on this list, as it is not a stand-alone company, but instead a partnership between Starbucks and the Alibaba owned grocery store Freshippo.  Customers can order online, and then within 15 minutes, pick up their Starbucks order in the store. At the moment it is operational in three Freshippo stores, but there are plans to expand to other locations.  What makes it different: Star Kitchens is quite different from others on this list, as it is not a stand-alone company, but instead a partnership between Starbucks and the Alibaba owned grocery store Freshippo.  Alibaba launched Freshippo in 2016, with the intention of launching a mobile-first grocery store. The brand now includes many different retail concepts, from convenience stores to the Star Kitchens kiosks.  Sweetheart Kitchen Money raised: $23.5 million Investors: Undisclosed Cities / Countries it operates in: Dubai and Kuwait, and the company is planning to add more locations across Saudi Arabia.  What it does: Sweetheart Kitchen was founded in Dubai in 2019 by Peter Schatzberg, who had previously founded pioneering ghost kitchen company Green Summit Group in 2012.  The company has created 30 of its own food brands.  What makes it different: Schatzberg's prior experience is extremely rare in this new industry. Green Summit Group company had early success but eventually ran out of money, which could teach Schatzberg major lessons about how to run a sustainable ghost kitchen business. Read more: Meet Material Bank, a Bain-backed logistics startup disrupting the architecture industry. Here's a look at its vision for becoming the Amazon of design. Swiggy Access Money raised: $1.6 billion Investors: Prosus Ventures, DST Global, Tencent, Meituan-Dianping and others Cities / Countries it operates in: India What it does: Swiggy is India's largest food delivery service. After launching in August of 2014, it has raised $1.6 billion in funding from major venture firms like Prosus Ventures, DST global, Bessemer Venture Partners.  The company launched its ghost kitchen brand, Swiggy Access in 2017, and at the end of 2019, the company had 8,000 people working for Swiggy Access, with its eyes on 7,000 more employees by the end of 2020. The company claimed to have 1,000 ghost kitchens across the country. What makes it different: Swiggy's built-in customer base is a major boom to the business. However, it was hit hard by the pandemic, with two rounds of roughly 1,000 person layoffs, one of which hit the cloud kitchens almost exclusively. TechCrunch got ahold of an internal email where CEO Sriharsha Majety said that the company had shut down many of its kitchens as a result of the virus, many of them permanently.   Taster Money raised: $13.1 million Investors: LocalGlobe, Marc Menase, Heartcore Capital, Global Founders Capital, Founders Future, Battery Ventures, Eduardo Ronzano, Kima Ventures Cities / Countries it operates in: UK, France, and Spain What it does: Taster, founded in 2017, operates its own food brands across Europe. What makes it different: The company was founded by Anton Soulier, a former Deliveroo executive.  It doesn't handle its own real estate, and partners with companies like CloudKitchens to find locations.  Zuul Kitchens Money raised: $9 million Investors: Undisclosed Cities / Countries it operates in: New York City What it does: Zuul Kitchens, a New York City-based ghost kitchen operator, was founded in 2018 by Corey Manicone, the former director of sales for white-label delivery operator Relay.  The company acquired food-delivery tech platform Ontray earlier this year. What makes it different: The company has partnered with brands like salad-masters Sweetgreen and Asian fast-casual Junzi in its NYC ghost kitchens. By working with established brands, this should lower the marketing burden on the company.
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Proper, a telehealth startup that offers sleep supplements and wellness coaching, recently announced $9.5 million in funding from Casa Verde with participation from Redesign Health. Cofounder and first-time CEO Nancy Ramamurthi told Business Insider that she started the company 6 months ago and ended up closing the funding round in even less time. The company, which has just 7 employees, is entirely remote with no plans to head into the office any time soon, Ramamurthi said.  Proper will have to stand out from other solutions that claim to address sleep issues right now, as more Americans are struggling with problematic sleep habits and anxiety-induced insomnia during the pandemic, but Ramamurthi said she's hopeful that her company's two-tiered approach will help differentiate it from other solutions. See the pitch deck that Ramamurthi used to raise $9.5 million as a first-time CEO. Click here for more BI Prime stories. Americans can't sleep during the coronavirus pandemic and all the anxieties it has unleashed, but a new startup is trying to offer a solution that's better than snake-oil supplements and mythical remedies. Proper is a 6-month-old startup with roots in telehealth and a first-time CEO with decades of experience in the tech industry. It combines personalized supplement regimens with nationally-certified wellness coaches who specialize in sleep behavior therapy.  CEO and cofounder Nancy Ramamurthi said the two-tiered approach helps distinguish it from its competitors. "My observation of the supplement space was that you have medications, you have over-the-counter solutions, and they all have negative side effects. Even natural supplements were really just melatonin and sugar in a gummy," Ramamurthi told Business Insider. "There was an opportunity to give the American consumer an option that was better and backed by science." Ramamurthi's background is that of a tech executive, although she leans heavily on a group of trusted advisors and experts, in addition to her 7-person team, to develop Proper's formulas and vet the science during product development. She began her career in service to the United States as a captain in the Army, however, and she says her dedication to purpose was behind her desire to solve a problem that afflicted many Americans prior to the pandemic, and does even more so now that the coronavirus has engulfed the country. "I had my own sleep issues but I really wanted to go after a massive problem," Ramamurthi said. "Then I realized, everyone sleeps. Sleep is super-individual, and sleep science is still very new. I could do something that had a massive impact on people." Recently, Proper announced that it raised $9.5 million in funding from Casa Verde and Redesign Health. All told, the round took less than 6 months to come together, and while Ramamurthi had yet to sit down in the same room with  her cofounder due to the pandemic. The company has been remote almost its entire existence, and Ramamurthi doesn't expect that to change once business resumes a new normal. "I hired our Chief Product Officer, my cofounder, and I've never met him in person," Ramamurthi said. "We were joking that we don't even know how tall he is." Ramamurthi had seen the fundraising process mainly from the outer rings while she worked at various technology companies, but she said still had a lot to learn as a first-time CEO. She had more than an idea on the back of a napkin, she said, but finding investors aligned with her company's mission was still a challenge. "I was connected to Redesign and Casa Verde at a good stage, so it hasn't been as hard for me as it has been for other new CEOs," Ramamurthi said. "It was really about quickly taking these concepts that we had in hand and building the business, and I did this through COVID in 6 months." See the pitch deck first-time CEO Nancy Ramamurthi used to raise $9.5 million for her telehealth startup Proper in less than 6 months.SEE ALSO: Meet the 24 designers, sales leaders, and other operators honored by a top early-stage VC firm as 'unsung heroes' who help founders build successful tech startups
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Check out this year's ORIGIN Innovation Awards and nominate a candidate.
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“Instagram and WhatsApp have been able to grow and operate their services using Facebook’s bespoke, lower-cost infrastructure"
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Writing an all-encompassing book on Python machine learning is difficult, given how expansive the field is. But reviewing one is not an easy feat either, especially when it’s a highly acclaimed title such as Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn, Keras, and TensorFlow: Concepts, Tools, and Techniques to Build Intelligent Systems, 2nd Edition. The book is a best-seller on Amazon, and the author, Aurélien Géron, is arguably one of the most talented writers on Python machine learning. And after reading Hands-on Machine Learning, I must say that Geron does not disappoint, and the second edition is an excellent resource for Python… This story continues at The Next Web
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Want to use WhatsApp on more than one device? Soon youlll be able to.
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US President Donald Trump has congratulated Elon Musk on his decision to build Tesla‘s new vehicle assembly plant in Texas. “Great job by Elon Musk in agreeing to build, in TEXAS [sic], what is expected to be the largest auto plant anywhere in the world,” said Trump in a tweet. “Texas and Tesla are big winners.” Great job by @elonmusk in agreeing to build, in TEXAS, what is expected to be the largest auto plant anywhere in the world. He kept his word to me. Texas & @Tesla are big winners. MADE IN THE USA! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump)… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Tesla
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Illustration by William Joel / The Verge In 2020, everything is cake — including Android 11. Android VP of engineering Dave Burke revealed the internal codename “Red Velvet Cake” in an interview with All About Android, via Droid Life. Google’s alphabetical dessert naming scheme was an Android tradition for years, dating back to Android 1.5 Cupcake in 2009. But last year, instead of naming Android Q after an obscure pastry tart or candy, Google made the choice to desert desserts entirely for its public releases in favor of numerical names instead, beginning with Android 10 and continued with the upcoming release of Android 11 this fall. Everything is cake But that’s not the whole story. As Google’s Sameer Samat, VP of product management for Android, told The Verge last year,... Continue reading…
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The demands of smartphone upgraders vary, but one request is generally consistent across the board: more battery life from their new phone. Making handsets that last longer, even under intensive loads such as computational photography and mobile gaming, is a key part of each generation of device. For the upcoming iPhone 12 Pro, though, Apple looks to be taking a … Continue reading
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Alexa headphones can make your listening experience much more intuitive and connected. Here are our favorite ones!
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Everything we know about new Star Wars TV show The Bad Batch, which follows on from The Clone Wars on Disney Plus.
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Microsoft is no longer selling 12-month subscriptions to Xbox Live Gold on its online store.
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Photo by Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images KFC is trying to create the world’s first laboratory-produced chicken nuggets, part of its “restaurant of the future” concept, the company announced. The chicken restaurant chain will work with Russian company 3D Bioprinting Solutions to develop bioprinting technology that will “print” chicken meat, using chicken cells and plant material. KFC plans to provide the bioprinting firm with ingredients like breading and spices “to achieve the signature KFC taste” and will seek to replicate the taste and texture of genuine chicken. It’s worth noting that the bioprinting process KFC describes uses animal material, so any nuggets it produced wouldn’t be vegetarian. KFC does offer a vegetarian option at some of its restaurants; last year it... Continue reading…
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Nearly four months after NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine told Fox News the coronavirus pandemic could potentially "impact on our missions," the space agency announced it was delaying the launch of the long-awaited James Webb Telescope.
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The 17-inch XPS tips the scales Continue reading…
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Sometimes the answers to our past can be found in piles of human poop, as an important new analysis shows.
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Starlink beta trials will start in Northern US and parts of Canada, new FAQ says.
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The plaintiffs allege that the tech giants used people's pictures obtained without permission to train their technologies.
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(University of Chicago Press Journals) San (Bushmen) communities in southern Africa continue to call upon their governments and international organizations to recognize their human rights and protect their welfare. They have lived in southern Africa for 20,000 to 40,000 years, yet they remain politically and economically marginalized in relation to other social groups.
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We’re here to guide you through the coronavirus pandemic. Sign up to the Life newsletter for daily tips, advice, how-tos and escapism.If you’re looking for ways to educate your little ones at home, there’s a new online resource to help you. Tiny Happy People is an initiative from BBC Education that aims to help develop young kids’ language skills – and it’s endorsed by the Duchess of Cambridge.The digital hub has been designed to support parents and carers in developing children’s language from pregnancy to the age of four. So what is it all about – and how can it help you and your kids? Here’s everything you need to know.Related... 12 Wacky Ways To Occupy Kids That Require Very Little Effort What is Tiny Happy People?Think of it like a digital hub, at the heart of which is a simple message, according to BBC Education: talk to children from as early an age as possible.There are online activities to try with your kids that aid development – you can filter the activities by the age of your child, so it’s suitable to them. Each one has a short video for parents to watch as well as info on how it boosts their language skills. Have a browse for yourself.The short films, articles and quizzes cover – in a bitesize way – the science behind brain development. The site also has tips and advice for parents, as well as expert-led Q&As. Oh, and everything’s free!This follows on from the BBC Bitesize offering for school age children offered to ease the homeschooling burdern on parents through lockdown.Related... All The Well-Known Faces Teaching Your Kids On BBC Bitesize This Term Why has it been launched?Evidence shows more than one in four children (27%) in England don’t reach the necessary level of literacy development (language, communication and literacy skills) by the time they start primary school, rising to more than one in three (42%) in deprived areas. The picture is similar across all nations of the UK.Research also shows that once children start behind, they stay behind, affecting performance in school and job prospects, the BBC shared. The resources on Tiny Happy People have been developed with the help of experts in child and language development to make sure parents are being offered the best advice. How is the Duchess of Cambridge involved?The Duchess has been part of the project for a number of months, visiting the Tiny Happy People team in London last November for a creative workshop where she worked with the team on some of the video resources and social media content.To mark the launch, The Duchess also met three families who have been involved in the pilot of Tiny Happy People. “Families and carers are at the heart of nurturing the next generation of happy, healthy adults, but sometimes it can be hard to know where to turn to for advice,” the Duchess said.“[It’s] an invaluable resource which provides parents and carers with support and tips, as well as simple activities to ensure children develop the language skills they need to have the best possible start in life.“I am delighted to have been part of its journey and hope families across the UK will enjoy exploring the resources.”Who else is involved?Also supporting the initiative are a number of celebs, who are using the activities to build their own infants’ communication skills.These include: soap stars Jennie McAlpine and Kieron Richardson; singer and farmer JB Gill; former Love Islanders, Jess and Dom Lever; BBC Three presenter Annie Price; and mum blogger Louiuse Pentland.Want to find out more? Visit the Tiny Happy People hub.Related... Here's Some Indoor Games To Play With Your Kids When They're Really, Really Bored Tom Hardy's Been Busy Recording More Bedtime Stories In His Back Garden Hey Duggee's Toothbrushing Song Has A Totally Brilliant Backstory
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Looking for OLED TV deals? We tracked down sales on must-have models from the likes of LG and Sony.
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Dyson's Airwrap does all the heavy lifting for you, for a price.
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