Diane Thomason

Diane Thomason

Followers 47
Following 34
US
SpaceX safely returned NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to Earth in a Crew Dragon capsule on August 2 — completing the rocket company's first human journey. In a briefing after the landing, Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX's president and COO, told Business Insider the mission went "surprisingly well." It wasn't without issues or quirks, though, such as errant boaters swarming the recovery site amid toxic propellant fumes detected outside the spacecraft. The astronauts said riding Crew Dragon through Earth's atmosphere was like being "inside of an animal." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. For the SpaceX and NASA officials overseeing the return of astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to earth, success wasn't just seeing a spaceship designed, built, and operated by SpaceX safely splash into the Gulf of Mexico. It was seeing the whole, history-making operation go off very nearly without a hitch.  "The greatest surprise is that this mission was as smooth as it is," Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX's president and COO, told Business Insider in a press briefing held a couple of hours after Demo-2's landing. But the denouement of the 65-day commercial test mission, called Demo-2, was not without surprises — some concerning, some just curious. Behnken and Hurley launched May 30 aboard SpaceX's 13.5-ton Crew Dragon spacecraft and returned to Earth Sunday in its crew capsule. By completing the mission, SpaceX, founded by Elon Musk in 2002, not only checked off its first-ever flight of people, but also resurrected crewed spaceflight from US soil, ending a nine-year pause created by NASA's retirement of the space shuttle. NASA, which has funded Crew Dragon's development and launches with $2.7 billion since 2009, seemed just as awestruck as SpaceX. "It did not seem like this was the first NASA-SpaceX mission with astronauts on board," astronaut Mike Hopkins, who's slated to fly on SpaceX's next Crew Dragon mission, said in the briefing. Still, Shotwell called out some "foibles" seen during the mission, some of which were highly visible in footage of the mission, and others that were not. "This was a demonstration mission," Shotwell said. "This is the time that you go learn about these things, and we'll certainly be better prepared next time." A failed backup generator Once Behnken and Hurley got the OK to undock from the ISS and return home, SpaceX deployed fleets of ships into the Gulf of Mexico to recover the capsule and the men inside. But one of its main recovery ships, called "GO Navigator," hit a snag before it left port: Its backup generator failed. While it didn't materially impact the mission — the ship handled the pickup just fine with its main generator — NASA and SpaceX both want redundancy so that nothing can get in the way of scooping its finest from the sea. "Next time we're going to have two backup generators," Shotwell said. Toxic fumes outside Crew Dragon To stay in orbit — essentially continuous freefall — around Earth from 250 miles up, Crew Dragon must move at a speed of about 17,500 mph. Getting back to the ground requires slowing down, and to do that, the astronauts opened the nosecone of the ship and fired its thrusters against the direction of flight for more than 11 minutes. The propellant that powers those thrusters is a brownish substance called nitrogen tetroxide, or nitrogen peroxide. Although the hypergolic (spontaneously igniting) fuel packs a lot of punch in a small amount of space, it is also a potent oxidizer that, if inhaled at concentrations as low as 50 parts per million, can kill a person by causing their lungs to fill with fluid. After the Crew Dragon capsule splashed down near the coast of Pensacola, Florida, recovery crews detected some of the oxidizer outside the vehicle. So they purged the system and waited about 45 minutes for the fumes to blow away. Steve Stich, the manager of NASA's Commercial Crew Program (which funds SpaceX as well as Boeing, which is also planning commercial flights), said during the briefing that the detected levels were "within limits" and recovery crews could have extracted the astronauts if needed. But they decided to play it safe. "We think there may be some mechanism where it's getting trapped into the service section from thruster firings during entry," Stich said. "We'll go figure out a way to handle it better on the next flight, perhaps starting with a purge as soon as we get on the vehicle." Space fans who put themselves and recovery operations 'in potential danger' When the astronauts landed, recovery boats weren't the only ones waiting to greet them: A flotilla of pleasure craft raced out to meet the spaceship, too. The scene alarmed the Coast Guard and mission managers, who were aware of the dangers of toxic fumes — especially to unwary spectators. The Coast Guard said it warned boaters multiple times ahead of the splashdown with radio alerts and physical warnings, according to a statement issued to CBS. Yet, because the landing site was in international waters, the Coast Guard lacked the legal authority and enough boats to do much about the problem. "Numerous boaters ignored the Coast Guard crews' requests and decided to encroach the area, putting themselves and those involved in the operation in potential danger," the statement said. NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said during Sunday's post-splashdown briefing that the crowd of boats "was not what we were anticipating." In the future, he added, NASA will utilize more resources to clear private boats from the ocean landing area. Behnken said Tuesday that he and Hurley "had absolutely no awareness" of the unwelcome flotilla of boaters after landing, but had a message for them. "Just a word to the wise for folks who have ideas of coming that close again in the future," Behnken said: "We take extreme precautions to make sure it is safe, and we do that for a reason." Glitchy iPad Minis Most of the apparent issues the astronauts experienced were not nearly as serious as the toxic fumes and errant boaters, and some fell into the category of spaceflight curiosities. For example, after undocking and flying away from the ISS, Behnken paged SpaceX's mission control center in Hawthorne, California for some tech support. He reported experiencing issues with an iPad Mini loaded with apps that the astronauts use as digital manuals for their spaceship and mission. "The timeline application on my tablet gives me an error message that Safari cannot open the page," Behnken said, noting the app said it couldn't load the app due to not being connected to the internet. The error appeared to be a caching issue, according to Space Explored, and occurred after SpaceX tried to beam updated mission timeline data to the tablet. Riding back to Earth 'inside of animal' And while both Behnken and Hurley had each flown to space twice before Demo-2, those flights were aboard NASA's space shuttle: a 100-ton orbiter with wings that landed on runways. It made for a much different ride than a 10.5-ton, gumdrop-shaped capsule plunging into water. As Business Insider's Morgan McFall-Johnsen reported, the landing experience — though they were ultimately pleased with it — caught the astronauts off-guard. "I would say it was more than what Doug and I expected," Behnken said in a press briefing on Tuesday. "I personally was surprised at just how quickly events all transpired." Behnken said the ship "came alive" and "it felt like we were inside of an animal" as it fired thrusters to keep a proper orientation during atmospheric reentry. He added: "It doesn't sound like a machine — it sounds like an animal." The astronauts also said the splashdown felt "very much like getting hit in the back of the chair with a baseball bat," Behnken said. Though not problems per se, the astronauts' impressions of landing will help future crews know what sensations to expect as they slow down from 17,500 mph to bobbing on the ocean's surface. 'You can never get complacent with a space vehicle' SpaceX is now poring over a mountain of mission data with NASA "just to make sure that there's nothing untoward," Stich said during the briefing. He added that aerospace engineers from both sides will be paying special attention to telemetry data related to undocking, spaceflight, atmospheric reentry, and parachute performance. The goal is to certify Crew Dragon for routine spaceflight, possibly within the next couple of months. That way operational missions can proceed, NASA can make the most use of its $100 billion investment in the ISS, and private passengers like Tom Cruise can, too. Based on an early look, no SpaceX or NASA officials flagged any showstoppers. Bridenstine said the spaceship was "in pretty good shape" heading into its review, which seeks to reuse the capsule on future flights. But Hurley — a Marine Corps test pilot — said Tuesday that he believes Crew Dragon needs a few more missions before he'd consider the vehicle "completely tested" and safe for flying civilians. "The space business, like a lot of those technically challenging businesses, is not forgiving," Hurley said. "Don't just assume, because the last flight went perfectly, that the next flight is going to go perfectly. You have to do that rigor and that analysis and that attention to detail." He added: "You can never get complacent with a space vehicle." Morgan McFall-Johnsen contributed reporting. Have a story or inside information to share about the spaceflight industry? Send Dave Mosher an email at [email protected] or a Twitter direct message at @davemosher. More secure communication options are listed here.SEE ALSO: Trump falsely said NASA 'was closed and dead' before he was president and appeared to take credit for a private SpaceX launch DON'T MISS: New video shows SpaceX's astronaut crew plummeting through Earth's atmosphere, floating under parachutes, and landing in the ocean Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why NASA waited nearly a decade to send astronauts into space from the US
US
Tencent's stock fell as much as 10% after Trump issued a vaguely-worded executive order banning US individuals and companies from doing business with its chat app WeChat. A second order targeted TikTok owner ByteDance. It was initially clear whether the order targeted Tencent's entire business. Tencent has a big presence in gaming, with stakes in Epic Games, Activision/Blizzard, and Ubisoft. Tencent's stock recovered slightly after a White House official clarified the order only applied to WeChat. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Chinese tech giant Tencent's stock fell by as much as 10% Thursday, wiping $45 billion off its market cap, after it was named in a vaguely-worded executive order issued by President Trump. The order, which goes into effect on September 20, prohibits US citizens and companies from carrying out any "transaction" with Tencent-owned chat app WeChat, although the orders were not precise about what counts as a "transaction." A second, similar order was targeted at ByteDance, the Chinese firm which owns wildly popular short-form video app TikTok. The Tencent order stipulated that it applied to: "Any transaction that is related to WeChat by any person, or with respect to any property, subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, with Tencent Holdings Ltd [...] or any subsidiary of that entity.' The vague wording implied that Tencent's entire business could be impacted, with potentially serious ramifications for the US gaming industry. As well as owning WeChat, which is extremely prevalent in mainland China, Tencent is also the largest gaming company in the world with stakes in Epic Games, Activision/Blizzard, and Ubisoft, as well as outright owning LA-based games studio Riot Games. A White House official confirmed to Business Insider late Thursday that the order only applies to transactions relating to WeChat, and not Tencent's wider business. Nonetheless, it hammered the company's market value. Tencent's stock plummeted as much as 10% after the order was first issued, wiping $45 billion off its market value, Bloomberg reports. The stock recovered after the clarification, and was down 5% on Friday morning. At time of writing Tencent's market cap stands at $5 trillion. Tencent did not immediately respond to a request for comment. ByteDance has threatened to sue the Trump administration over the order, which it says was issued without due process.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
US
The company's latest portfolio is filled with powerful and expensive devices.
US
Russian state atomic energy corporation Rosatom is planning to remove the most dangerous radioactive items from the country’s Arctic seafloor, according to a media report.
1
UK
A Chinese AI firm is suing Apple for alleged patent infringement involving the voice assistant Siri. Shanghai Zhizhen — also known as Xiao — is seeking $1.43 billion (10 billion yuan) in damages from Apple. It also wants the firm to stop selling products in China that breach the patent, which would mean most iPhones, iPads, and Macs would no longer be available in Apple‘s second-largest market. “As a tech person, I have a lot of respect for Apple, whose products and services bring a lot of value and experience to the world,” said Xiao-i CEO Yuan Hui in a statement. “But… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Apple
UK
You might soon be able to forever mute those annoying WhatsApp groups you never really participate in. The Facebook-owned messenger seems to be testing an “Always Muted” option for chats, WABetaInfo has noticed. The feature is still in development, but it will likely replace the “1 year” option which WhatsApp currently gives to users. At present, WhatsApp lets users mute chats for eight hours, a week, or a year. Unfortunately, those options leave a gap for certain chats where you need to be, but don’t necessarily have to follow the full discussion. I’ve got one of these too. The building… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: WhatsApp
US
NASA is about to send its next rover to Mars: a nuclear-powered robot called Perseverance. Perseverance is expected to record the first high-quality video and audio of Mars, drill rock samples that could contain signs of alien life, and deploy the first interplanetary helicopter. Here's how NASA's newest Mars rover works. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. NASA is gearing up to launch its next Mars rover: an SUV-sized, nuclear-powered robot decked out in cutting-edge equipment. Perseverance, the fifth rover the US has sent to Mars, is set to complete tasks that the previous robots could only dream of. The $2.4 billion vehicle is designed to collect unprecedented video and audio, drill samples of Martian rock and soil for later return to Earth, search for chemical remnants of ancient microbial life, and test out technologies that future astronauts will need on the red planet. The rover is scheduled to launch at 7:50 a.m. ET on July 30, atop an Atlas V rocket. Its seven-month, 314-million-mile  (505-million-kilometer) journey to Mars is slated to end in the Jezero Crater — one of the largest impact craters on Mars. A giant jetpack is built in to lower Perseverance onto the site, where some of the planet's oldest rock is laid bare. Here's how the mission will work.  Martian rock samples could contain evidence of alien life Perseverance's mission calls for it to mine Jezero Crater's ancient rock for chemical signatures of ancient alien life. Rocks that formed in water, for example, could have preserved the remains of chemicals that only life can create. Such rocks may be plentiful in the Jezero Crater exposed layers. A special arm of the robot is designed to drill cores from those rocks and cache them on the planet's surface. "Samples from Mars have the potential to profoundly change our understanding of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life on Earth and elsewhere in the solar system," Lori Glaze, Director of NASA's Planetary Science Division, said in a briefing on July 17. NASA plans to launch another rover to retrieve those samples in 2026. The fetch rover would collect the tubes and carry them to a rocket, which would then launch them into Mars's orbit. There, a spacecraft circling the planet would catch the samples and carry them back to Earth. "If it sounds complicated — it is," Glaze said. But this rover has more immediate, straightforward goals, too. The first interplanetary helicopter will drop from the rover's belly About two months after it lands, Perseverance is set to drop a small helicopter from its belly. NASA has programmed the helicopter, named Ingenuity, to demonstrate the first powered flight ever conducted on another planet. If successful, four carbon-fiber blades will spin eight times as fast as a standard helicopter on Earth, lifting Ingenuity off the ground and carrying it through the thin Martian atmosphere. Ingenuity weighs just 4 pounds, since the Martian air is just 1% of the density of Earth's atmosphere. Perseverance will beam back high-def video of a Mars landing For the first time, NASA plans to film the entire landing of a Mars rover in high definition. "Those cameras will be taking high-definition video of the spacecraft during entry, descent, and landing activity. So we should be able to watch this big parachute inflate supersonically, we should be able to watch the rover deploy and touch down on the surface," Matt Wallace, the deputy project manager for Perseverance, said in the briefing. "This is going to be very exciting. It's the first time that we have ever been able to see a spacecraft landing on another planet." The rover's 3D cameras can also take high-definition photos and high-speed video as it roams the Martian surface. Two cameras on the mast are programmed to identify rocks and soil for the rover's other instruments to investigate or collect and stow. The cameras should also help scientists observe details in Martian rock and sediment. Perseverance will carry microphones as well. If the devices work, they'll enable NASA to record the first bonafide audio of Mars, including gusts of wind, the rover's wheels rolling over soil and rocks, the sounds of drilling, and more. Previous Mars missions also brought microphones with them, but as Nancy Atkinson wrote for The Planetary Society, those were a "huge let-down" — they either failed or never activated. Perseverance will test technologies to keep astronauts alive to Mars NASA ultimately aims to send astronauts to Mars and set up a settlement there. (Elon Musk, who is developing a spaceship that might be able to carry people to the red planet, hopes to put boots there in 2024.) But NASA first needs to figure out how to meet the needs of any future Mars-dwelling people: oxygen, food, water, and fuel. Perseverance will help the agency test some options. One of the rover's projects, called the Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE), will attempt to convert Martian carbon dioxide into oxygen that future astronauts could breathe. About 95% of the red planet's atmosphere is CO2, so successfully converting it to oxygen would be a big win for future Martian settlements. Abundant oxygen would also help astronauts produce new rocket fuel for the journey home. Five small pieces of spacesuit material, including a piece of helmet visor, will also travel to Mars aboard the rover. One of the robot's instrument will track the materials' reaction to the Martian environment, to inform future Mars-spacesuit designers.  The rover will also collect data that could help scientists better predict Martian weather — an ability that will be crucial to survival on the planet's harsh surface.SEE ALSO: NASA plans to bring astronauts back to Earth in SpaceX's Crew Dragon spaceship on August 2. The process is Elon Musk's biggest worry. DON'T MISS: The United Arab Emirates launched a mission to Mars on Sunday. NASA and China are about to follow with their own rovers, an orbiter, and a helicopter. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: The Mars 2020 rover started as a pile of aluminum panels that took over 5,000 hours to assemble. Here's how it was made.
UK
BMW has announced that it will offer a fully electric 5-series car as part of a product overhaul that was unveiled this week. The electric vehicle is part of BMW’s push to lower vehicle emissions. As vehicle emissions standards increase, particularly in Europe and the US, BMW is looking at electricity to meet its goals. In the next decade, BMW … Continue reading
US
As more and more people start to work from home in response to the pandemic, this pilot fish tech consultant is mainly dealing with remote-connectivity issues, like accessing LAN resources over the VPN.And that’s the case with the employee of one client that fish is helping, but as fish’s remote support software is downloading, the guys says, “We may have a little problem to solve first.”The little problem is clear to fish as soon as the user’s screen comes up. “Why,” fish asks, “is your screen all in Arabic?”The answer is that he is taking classes at a local college to learn the language, and he wanted to modify his machine to allow a secondary Arabic keyboard, which would allow him to write papers for class in Arabic. But instead he converted his machine to Arabic as the first language.To read this article in full, please click here
US
The latest preview of The New Mutants makes us wonder how much footage is too much in a movie trailer.
China
Microsoft will unveil a new foldable Android phone. But that’s not what you expecting! The Surface Duo was unveiled back in October last year and ... The post Microsoft Surface Duo receives Bluetooth SIG certification appeared first on Gizchina.com.
UK
Get the latest on coronavirus. Sign up to the Daily Brief for news, explainers, how-tos, opinion and more.Boris Johnson has said people opposed to vaccinations are “nuts” while promoting an expanded programme of free winter flu jabs. Speaking on the first anniversary of becoming prime minister at a doctors’ surgery in London, Johnson said to staff: “There’s all these anti-vaxxers now.“They are nuts. They are nuts.”He also predicted the UK will be “well on the way past” coronavirus by the “middle of next year”.“But I must be clear with people, I do still think that we have tough times ahead in keeping this virus under control,” he added.“We have tough times ahead in coming through economically.“But I’ve absolutely no doubt that we are going to and this country is going to bounce back stronger than ever before.”The government is aiming to double its winter flu vaccine programme in England to 30m people.People aged 50 and over, and 11-year-olds, will be added to the list of who is eligible for free jabs.Around 15m people received a seasonal flu vaccination last year.Experts are concerned about the double impact of coronavirus and seasonal flu on the NHS.Johnson said he wants “everybody to get a flu jab”.“That’s why we’re rolling out the biggest ever programme of flu immunisation,” he told reporters. “And we’re aiming first of all for schoolchildren up to Year 7, for pregnant women, for people over 65, for people who are shielded, but then we will be extending it to people who are 50 to 65.“Now the reason for doing this is to protect the NHS in the winter months because obviously we have still got Covid, we have still got the threat of a second spike on Covid, and it’s vital therefore to keep that pressure off the NHS by everybody getting a flu jab and I really hope everybody will.”Related... Chance Of Coronavirus Vaccine By Christmas 'Very Low', Says Chris Whitty Humanity Will Have To Live With Coronavirus 'For Decades', Says Sage Expert How Close Is The UK To Finding A Coronavirus Vaccine?
US
HBO Max needs to get more people to sign up for HBO Max who already qualify for an upgrade to the newer, bigger streaming app through their pay TV provider, parent company AT&T says.
US
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, COVID-19 symptoms usually include fever, cough, aches and difficulty breathing, among others. A new study, however, suggests that skin rashes, which are not listed by the CDC, are also a sign of the deadly virus.
US
Disney has slashed its advertising budget on Facebook, the Wall Street Journal reports. The news comes after more than 500 advertisers suspended ads on Facebook as part of an industry boycott of the platform over its stance on hate speech. Disney was the single biggest advertiser on Facebook in the first half of this year, according to analysis by research firm Pathmatics Inc. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Disney has slashed its advertising spend on Facebook and Instagram amid a boycott of the social-media platform led by civil-rights groups, the Wall Street Journal reports. Sources familiar with the matter didn't say how much had been cut, or when the decision was taken. The sources said Disney-owned streaming service Hulu had paused all advertising on Instagram, and one source said that ads for its cable network shows are unlikely to return to Facebook after the summer TV advertising lull, unless the social media giant changes its policies. The Facebook boycott, "Stop Hate for Profit," was launched in June by a coalition of civil rights groups including the NAACP, Color of Change, and the Anti-Defamation League. It asks big companies to stop advertising on Facebook in an attempt to force the company to rethink its hate speech and misinformation policies. A series of high-profile advertisers including Coca-Cola, Dunkin' Donuts, Verizon, and more than 500 others have announced they are suspending their ads on the social network. Disney has not officially announced any decision to reduce advertising spend, and was not immediately available for comment when contacted by Business Insider. Analysis provided to the Journal by research firm Pathmatics Inc suggests Disney was the top advertiser on Facebook for the first half of this year, spending an estimated $210 million. It was the number two spender in 2019, behind Home Depot. Leaders from Stop Hate for Profit met with Facebook executives including Mark Zuckerberg on July 7, and came away unimpressed. In a press call, the groups said the meeting had been a "disappointment," and that out of ten recommendations they had put forward to Facebook, it had only partially addressed one: That the company should hire a C-suite level civil rights exec. Facebook said it would hire a civil rights lead, but did not commit to make them a member of the C-suite.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
US
Here's help picking out the best iPad to meet your feature and performance needs.
UK
If you find yourself using the desktop version of Twitter often, then you’re about to get a useful new feature. Twitter today announced the roll out of a home screen shortcut of sorts that will put your direct messages front and center. Gone are the days of switching between your timeline and messages tab, at least on the desktop iteration … Continue reading
US
(Shinshu University) Germ cell depletion in recipient testis has adverse effects on spermatogenesis in orthotopically transplanted testis pieces via retinoic acid insufficiency. Repetitive RA administration significantly improved donor spermatogenesis to produce healthy offspring.
UK
Remember the Razer Phone? The not so unexpected smartphone from the gaming giant can be credit for having carved out a niche gaming smartphone market. Unlike the ones that followed its lead, however, Razer has failed to continue what it started, stopping at the Razer Phone 2 from 2018. Razer laid the blame of the Razer Phone 3’s delay on … Continue reading
US
While they're not quite ready for production, the printed parts were lighter, ran cooler and unlocked more power than the standard forged pistons.
US
On Nov. 9, German nonprofit Die Offene Gesellschaft (The Open Society) sent a letter to the White House urging the president to reconsider his position on a wall at the U.S.-Mexico border.The heartfelt plea wasn’t written on paper, but rather a piece of the actual Berlin Wall, which was erected in 1961 as a way of separating East and West Germany during the Cold War.Stretching across 27 miles and standing at 12 feet, the wall separated many Germans from their loved ones, leaving them unable to make contact.Before its fall in 1989, about 80 people died trying to cross to the West—and it’s remembered now as a relic of brutality, oppression and significant loss.Another group, a collective of street artists known as The Cultural Heirs, has created a campaign that is both a celebration of the Berlin Wall’s demise and a sobering reminder of the atrocities that the wall’s existence incited.With the help of Berlin-based creative agency Heimat, The Cultural Heirs has launched “Voice of the Wall” to explore one question: If the Berlin Wall were alive, what would it say?
UK
It appears Facebook might be actively using your camera without your knowledge while you’re scrolling your feed.The issue has come to light after a user going by the name Joshua Maddux took to Twitter to report the unusual behavior, which occurs in the Facebook app for iOS.The problem becomes evident due to a bug that shows the camera feed in a tiny sliver on the left side of your screen, when you open a photo in the app and swipe down.Here’s what this looks like:Found a @facebook security & privacy issue.I found a bug in the app that lets you see the camera open behind your feed.
Sweden
”Va?...Förlåt nu lyssnar jag.” Slentriansvajpar på Tinder samtidigt som jag pratar i telefon med Sabina.Inom startupcommunityn pratar vi mycket om vikten av att utveckla produkter som är ”sticky”, alltså som användaren vill interagera med mest hela tiden.En kvalitativ produkt som noga skräddarsys efter målgruppens behov kan uppnå stickyness av sig själv, men för den som har bråttom finns några smarta genvägar.Deras före detta president Sean Parker har beskrivit hur man medvetet utnyttjade en sårbarhet i den mänskliga biologin för att bygga en produkt som skulle konsumera så mycket som möjligt av användarens tid och uppmärksamhet.Eftersom en del av våra hjärnor fortfarande bearbetar de nya intrycken störs vårt fokus även långt efter att vi lagt ifrån oss luren.Jag blir bjuden på Borstj och blinies hos en kompis kompis på Sibyllegatan.
US
The Apple Watch can now be used as a Roku remote while streaming.It's the same remote that appears on the phone app -- just wrist sized.As of Friday, it'll appear on your Apple smartwatch if you update the mobile app to version 6.1.3 via your iPhone.The Roku app on the Apple Watch also allows you to launch channels on your TV by tapping your watch screen, with the channels listed in order of most recently watched.You can additionally use voice search via the watch by tapping the voice icon inside the Roku app.Lastly, if you can't find your Roku remote, the Apple Watch app can be used to locate it.
China
One of the most favorite features in the high-end flagship smartphones of the moment is the 90 Hz screen.The companies had not innovated much in the panels of their smartphones beyond the curved design or the notch.The 90 Hz refresh rate came as a breath of fresh air to the high range and in 2020 we expect it to be standardized for all companies.Smartphones such as the Galaxy S11, the Huawei P40 or the next iPhone should arrive with this screen technology.But today we are here to talk about OnePlus and specifically the OnePlus 8 Pro.Only a few weeks ago, OnePlus introduced the OnePlus 7T and 7T Pro, two of the best devices in the current market.
US
With Black Friday and Cyber Monday just around the corner, it’s the perfect time to save some cash and purchase video game products.If you haven’t purchased one of the main three gaming consoles — Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, Playstation 4 — or you just want to beef up your collection with the best games of the year, you will see big discounts from GameStop, Amazon, Best Buy, Walmart, Target, and several other retailers.We’ve outlined the best Black Friday and Cyber Monday gaming deals, including some deals you can score ahead of the holidays.Each year, we see Microsoft and Sony each offer a big discount on Xbox One and PlayStation 4 bundles.$200 for a PS4 “slim” model with a game like Spider-Man or even Call of Duty: Modern Warfare is entirely plausible, and Microsoft is likely going to offer the Xbox One S and Xbox One X with a subscription to Game Pass, so you’ll have unlimited access to its entire library of first-party titles.Nintendo is a little bit trickier with its discounts.
UK
A new study shows us that the Paris Agreement won’t be enough to stave off rising sea levels – even if world leaders actually step up to the task of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.Published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Monday, the study shows that our efforts will lock in a metre of sea-level rise (that’s more than 3 feet for the metric-illiterate among us) come 2300 if everyone sticks to the pledges they set forth in the Paris Agreement.In other words, even our best efforts to prevent the climate crisis won’t be enough to protect coastal cities and low-lying islands.And if we continue to do nothing, as appears to be the case, sea-level rise will be much worse than a single metre by 2300.Our oceans respond much more slowly to the increasing amount of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere.That can take anywhere from decades to, potentially, millennia.
US
A dozen bottles of fine French wine arrived at the space station Monday, not for the astronauts, but for science.The red Bordeaux wine will age for a year up there before returning to Earth.Researchers will study how weightlessness and space radiation affect the aging process.The goal is to develop new flavors and properties for the food industry.The bottles flew up aboard a Northrop Grumman capsule that launched from Virginia on Saturday and arrived at the International Space Station on Monday.Universities in Bordeaux, France, and Bavaria, Germany, are taking part in the experiment from Space Cargo Unlimited, a Luxembourg startup.
US
Tesla's electric pickup truck, aka 'Cybertruck,' coming this month2020 Hyundai Venue is an affordable point of interest with sub-$20,000 price tag5 hidden Google Maps tricks you need to knowCar radio is reinventing itselfUber self-driving car involved in crash had no system to identify jaywalkers
US
YouTube today is expanding the ways creators can make money with the global launch of a new feature, Super Stickers.The stickers are aimed at fans who want to show their support and connect with favorite creators, similar to Super Chat, which highlights a fan’s messages within a live chat.To be eligible for either, creators have to operate a monetized channel with more than 1,000 subscribers in supported markets.Super Chat was first launched nearly three years ago as a way for creators to generate additional income from top fans.This is particularly useful in crowded live chats hosted by popular creators where the comments section is packed, such as during premieres.A “super chat,” similar to Twitch’s Cheering feature, lets a fan call attention to their message by highlighting it in a bright color and pinning it to the top of the stream to give it more visibility.
More

Top